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Old 01-20-2013, 05:24 PM   #46
cynwulf
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To be honest, I couldn't care less what distros or OS other people use - Slackware is fine for me.
 
Old 01-20-2013, 05:58 PM   #47
pataphysician
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Well Slackware beats Caitlyn's non-existant Yarok distro by leaps and bounds, as one to watch. Her distro seems to be stuck in the future. On the upside, Yarok is totally secure, because your computer's hard drive will be blank and unable to boot.
 
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Old 01-20-2013, 06:14 PM   #48
rabirk
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Quote:
Comparing Mint with Slackware with regard to pre-installed software for DVD playback. Other than Slackware, Mint's "headquarter" is not in the USA, but in Ireland. They simply don't have to care about software patents on codecs and other software needed to playback a DVD
@TobiSGD -- Thank you. This is the best explanation I'd seen as to why DVDs don't play. From my reading, I had thought that most other people, in both Slackware and other distros, had no problem with this.

Quote:
Of course iTunes will always be much better integrated in an Apple environment than in an environment that is totally unsupported by Apple. But this is not Linux fault, it is Apple's fault
This is also true. However, this gets to a chicken and egg issue. For Apple, Amazon, and other content providers to make their products more Linux-friendly, there needs to be a critical mass of people using Linux and buying their content for use on Linux. This won't happen without the more "newbie-friendly" systems.

Quote:
To the (seemingly endlessly growing) segment of Linux users who truly believe that the operating system's raison d'Ítre is to be the ultimate drop-in Windows replacement for noobs, I guess most Slackware, Gentoo, BSD, and CentOS users along with myself will always seem hopelessly impossible to understand. So be it; such users should stick with Mint and Ubuntu anyway.
I certainly don't want a Windows replacement. I moved from Windows to Mac in 2006, and I don't plan to ever go back to Microsoft.
I like Slackware and I think it will be my primary OS for the near term. I'm hoping I'll be able to stick with it and I intend to keep learning, with a little help. But I'm not sure any Linux distro, could ever be my sole system. Apple's functionality is just so amazing, I'll probably end up stuck at least partly in the Apple universe. I'd rather buy a good non-Apple desktop system to house my digital movies and music, but I just can't have enough faith that Linux will be able to play it and provide some of the other functionality I may need. I think Banshee is the best music software I've found for Linux, and I can't find a SlackBuild for that.

At the same time, I chose Slackware when I decided to learn Linux because it claimed to be the most UNIX-like, and I do consider that to be a benefit, proudly "stuck in the 90s" though it is. I appreciate how Slackware is put together, and I understand where you're coming from, @foodown. (And thanks for the SlackBuild links!)
 
Old 01-20-2013, 06:42 PM   #49
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foodown View Post
In this sense, I find Slackware to be one of the most successful Linux distributions. It's very UNIX-like, perhaps the most UNIX-like in the "UNIX in the 1990s" sense: reliable, predictable, ready to be easily configured to whatever role, and intended for use by someone who knows what they are doing. You know where else you'll find programs that are "anachronisms?" Solaris, NetBSD, AIX ... You know, other real UNIX systems.
I would also add in FreeBSD and OpenBSD as additional real Unix systems. When I run a BSD I prefer OpenBSD.
Well-said. Slackware being UNIX-like also has added benefits when you're using other distros that are point-and-click. Things will break on graphical distros and it is nice to be able to roll up your sleeves and fix things under the hood with an editor on the command line. Slackware is perfect as is.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 02:44 AM   #50
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pataphysician View Post
well slackware beats caitlyn's non-existant yarok distro by leaps and bounds, as one to watch. Her distro seems to be stuck in the future. On the upside, yarok is totally secure, because your computer's hard drive will be blank and unable to boot.
roflol !!!!
 
Old 01-21-2013, 03:29 AM   #51
Poucket
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pataphysician View Post
Well Slackware beats Caitlyn's non-existant Yarok distro by leaps and bounds, as one to watch. Her distro seems to be stuck in the future.
Yes. That is a real syndrome.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 04:09 AM   #52
jtsn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabirk View Post
I still can't play DVD movies on Slackware and can't figure out why not.
Slackware can't play ancient DVD movies, because the producers of this stuff don't want it to. They want you to buy a device called "DVD player", that you connect to your TV.

Rotating optical media is also stuck in the 1990s. DVD movie support was a valid point ten years ago, but today new computers don't have an ODD. This stuff becomes extinct till 2020 anyway, so we shouldn't care.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 06:21 AM   #53
TobiSGD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
DVD movie support was a valid point ten years ago, but today new computers don't have an ODD.
I don't know where you get that information from, but I can assure you that 99.9% of the desktop computers sold currently still have an ODD. Just because netbooks don't have one it doesn't mean that they are obsolete. I also know that there are still people out there that watch DVD movies. That Slackware doesn't support DVD playback out of the box is not caused by technical, but by legal issues. Install libdvdcss and libdvdnav and you can watch DVDs just fine.

By the way, I also know that 99.9% of desktop users use a GUI for their stuff, so maybe we should remove the console tools from Slackware, they are so stuck in the 80's.
 
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:56 AM   #54
GazL
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The qwerty keyboard is stuck in the 1870's, clearly we don't need to support that any more.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 08:53 AM   #55
irgunII
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Pffft! I use smoke signals to communicate with my Slackware and sometimes revert to hitting it over the head with a club and dragging it away by the hair.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 09:22 AM   #56
brianL
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I got my first computer in 2002, and started with Linux in early 2005, so I've no idea what being stuck in the '90s is like. But I do know without doubt that I prefer Slackware to any other distro I've tried.
As for playing DVDs, grab Alien Bob's VLC. Or MPlayer. Even Dragon Player, that comes with KDE, does the job quite well.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 09:30 AM   #57
GazL
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I still use xine for dvds. MPlayer still seems to struggle with the dvd menus a little. Never bothered installing vlc as I already have a choice of 2 media players, and a 3rd seemed a little redundant.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 10:09 AM   #58
jtsn
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I don't know where you get that information from, but I can assure you that 99.9% of the desktop computers sold currently still have an ODD.
I didn't mention "desktop computers", I mentioned "new computers". These are

- the recently very popular ARM-based computers
- Ultrabooks
- recent notebook models (such as MacBook Pro)
...and so on

Of course, if you're looking for a tower PC with an ODD and a floppy drive, you can still get one. But that doesn't make this legacy tech more relevant for current Slackware.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 10:27 AM   #59
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
Of course, if you're looking for a tower PC with an ODD and a floppy drive, you can still get one. But that doesn't make this legacy tech more relevant for current Slackware.
I'm running an IT business in South France (http://www.microlinux.fr), and I can assure you most of the new hardware I install for clients around here is equipped with optical drives. Actually the only piece of hardware that doesn't have an optical drive around here is my Panasonic Toughbook and the HP Proliant Microservers I install on a regular basis.
 
Old 01-21-2013, 10:38 AM   #60
GazL
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Laptops have always sacrificed features for portability and externally attached optical drives have been the norm with ultra-portables and sub-notebooks for as long as I can remember. I'm not surprised that Apple went this way with their notebook line, as well as the traditional advantages it brings:
  • They get to keep the component costs down.
  • They get to sell you an external drive (which knowing Apple will be far more expensive than it ought to be).
  • And being a content vendor they have a vested interest in trying to get you to buy downloads directly from them.

Besides, until content providers get their act together and start selling albums in lossless formats rather than the lossy crap like mp3/aac they currently try and push then CD is still the only way of buying high quality music recordings and is far from 'legacy'.

As for movie downloads, I think it is going to be a good few years yet before downloading replaces dvd as a delivery mechanism. ISP data caps and per GB charging are going to be a significant barrier to adoption for a good while yet.
 
  


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