LinuxQuestions.org
Support LQ: Use code LQ3 and save $3 on Domain Registration
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 08-24-2004, 03:12 PM   #1
pandasuit
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 70

Rep: Reputation: 15
Speeding up Linux (Slack) boot


I have been searching for a guide or bit of info on how to speed up the Linux boot. I am not too concerned with speeding up my main install (it needs to be a fully functional desktop) but I would like to put together a cut down version of Slack that boots fast and is only used for multimedia (think InterVideo InstantOn). I was thinking that this would be a great way to learn more about the boot process and how to control it than it would be for making anything actually usable. Who knows...I could use some of the techniques to speed up my main install too.

Anyways, my quick searching has come up with some stuff but nothing so far that is Slackware specific or (after a quick perusal) hugely effective. It is possible that my searching skills suck. Basically I was hoping someone else has already looked for this info and come up with good sources or that someone might be able to help me out with some other info.

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 03:37 PM   #2
SocialEngineer
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 236

Rep: Reputation: 30
Oof - well, Slack 10 boots a lot slower, so I'd recommend using 9.1. Comment out ldconfig and all unnecessary services in /etc/rc.d/rc.M - if you insist on using Slack 10, start reading up on the hotplug script, you'll need to hack some chunks out of it to speed things up.

That's about all I can offer. It won't be instant on fast, but it'll be faster.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 03:55 PM   #3
WMD
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2004
Location: Florida
Distribution: Slackware, Debian
Posts: 484

Rep: Reputation: 30
The hotplug script is really useful though...it gets my sound card going all by itself.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 04:21 PM   #4
SocialEngineer
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 236

Rep: Reputation: 30
That's why I said hack it - don't remove it, tweak it.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 04:37 PM   #5
pandasuit
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
Where would I learn what to change and what to leave?
 
Old 08-24-2004, 06:10 PM   #6
SocialEngineer
Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 236

Rep: Reputation: 30
Right now there isn't much on the subject - Run a search for hacking hotplug on the Slack forums, I made a post asking for any information on the subject. Not sure what people submitted, I can't really remember - I haven't had time to go through it yet.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 06:31 PM   #7
shilo
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Stockton, CA
Distribution: Slackware 11 - kernel 2.6.19.1 - Dropline Gnome 2.16.2
Posts: 1,132

Rep: Reputation: 49
Instead of going to the trouble to hack up the hotplug script, why not do this:

1) Start your computer using the hotplug script
2) lsmod - This will show you all of the modules that have been loaded by hotplug
3) Add the modules to /etc/rc.d/rc.modules
3a) cp /etc/rc.d/rc.modules /etc/rc.d/rc.modules.orig you may want to back up the file first
4) chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.modules to make sure that rc.modules is run at boot time
5) chmod -x /etc/rc.d/rc.hotplug to make sure hotplug isn't run at boot time
6) reboot and make sure everything is still working

I beleive that another thing that slows down the boot time considerably is ldconfig. You can get rid of that at boot time by opening up /etc/rc.d/rc.M and looking for the following:

Code:
# Update all the shared library links:
if [ -x /sbin/ldconfig ]; then
  echo "Updating shared library links:  /sbin/ldconfig"
  /sbin/ldconfig
fi
Which can be changed to:

Code:
# Update all the shared library links:
#if [ -x /sbin/ldconfig ]; then
#  echo "Updating shared library links:  /sbin/ldconfig"
#  /sbin/ldconfig
#fi
Of course, you'll then want to run ldconfig manually every once in awhile, like whenever you install new software or update anything.

You should search through the entire /etc/rc.d directory and take away executable permission from anything that you don't want run at boot time. THis will speed up your boot time and your computer as a whole, since you won't be starting and running services that you don't want. Be careful, though, you'll want to make sure that you don't need the file, first. I recommend 1 file at a time, then reboot if you aren't sure. Keep a boot disk handy in case you need to change the executable permission back on.
 
Old 08-24-2004, 06:40 PM   #8
pandasuit
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
thx
 
Old 08-24-2004, 09:58 PM   #9
tank728
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Posts: 142

Rep: Reputation: 16
Shilo nice post, but you might not what to chmod -x /etc/rc.d/rc.hotplug if you have kernel 2.6 with udev. udev is very dependent on hotplug so look out for that.

Shilo nice guide "This is how I do it all"

-tank
 
Old 08-24-2004, 11:36 PM   #10
jong357
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Columbus, OH
Distribution: DIYSlackware
Posts: 1,914

Rep: Reputation: 52
It is pretty slow, huh? That was one of the very first things I did, was to disable hotplug and ldconfig... If you run a progressbar it louses up the whole continuity to it as well. Also makes you do a "ho, hum" for about 10 seconds... Disabling that made my sound card not work as expected but I inserted a line that executes snddevices at the top of rc.alsa.... It works.... I don't mind having it recreate all those /dev nodes every boot. Takes about 0.8 seconds to do. I'm also running 2.6.8.1 to no ill effect without hotplug.......
 
Old 08-25-2004, 03:05 AM   #11
codec
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2003
Location: mad.es.eu
Distribution: ubuntu 5.04 knoppix Slack91/10 freebsd51 vector4 redhat9
Posts: 304

Rep: Reputation: 30
my method is skipping ldconfig and fc-cache

- when I think there are something weird about the library, I would run ldconfig
- each time when I install fonts, I would run mkfontscale, mkfontdir and fc-cache
 
Old 08-26-2004, 12:47 PM   #12
shilo
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Stockton, CA
Distribution: Slackware 11 - kernel 2.6.19.1 - Dropline Gnome 2.16.2
Posts: 1,132

Rep: Reputation: 49
If you just want a multimedia distrobution, you may want to check out http://www.geexbox.org .
 
Old 08-26-2004, 01:15 PM   #13
pandasuit
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
It is a dual project in a way. I want to learn about the boot process and I want to build a system to replace my Liteon LVD2001. The LVD has been awesome and I dont regret buying it but it is starting to choke on new formats and it still does not play DivX3 properly. Furthermore it appears that Liteon has stopped supporting it as no new firmware has been release in a long time and it still has some issues. Plus it would be nice to add some of my own features.

In case you dont know the Liteon LVD2001 is one in a series of set top DVD and DivX (XviD) players built by Liteon. It actually runs a cut down version of Linux.

See here (the LVD 2010) is the newest version of what I have):
http://www.liteonit.com/DC/english/productinfo.htm


I will definately check out this geexbox. It looks to be what I want and I can always play with it a bit to learn the boot process. Also...it is modifiable. Also, how fast does it boot? Would prolly be worth installing to a HD to speed the boot up and free up the CD drive.
 
Old 08-26-2004, 01:22 PM   #14
shilo
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2002
Location: Stockton, CA
Distribution: Slackware 11 - kernel 2.6.19.1 - Dropline Gnome 2.16.2
Posts: 1,132

Rep: Reputation: 49
Not usre how fast it boots. Just saw it yesterday while browsing freshmeat. It's pretty popular over there. I just remembered this thread and thought it might be what you were looking for. I'd definately load it onto the hard drive to speed it up, though.

To learn the boot process, just follow along with the scripts in /etc/rc.d. They are commented pretty well. You can back up the entire directory and start commenting out stuff you don't need, if you like.
 
Old 08-26-2004, 01:37 PM   #15
pandasuit
Member
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 70

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
ok thx.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Speeding up my Linux augu2000 Mandriva 10 11-04-2005 02:48 PM
Need help speeding up my boot NonSumPisces Linux - General 2 09-05-2004 04:42 PM
Speeding up boot by stopping unnecessary services hamish Linux - Software 2 09-09-2003 03:11 PM
Speeding up boot by stopping unnecessary services hamish Linux - Software 1 09-09-2003 08:25 AM
Speeding up Linux Jacob2003 Linux - General 22 09-27-2002 06:12 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:36 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration