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Old 04-01-2005, 03:31 PM   #16
mastermindNYC
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Registered: Nov 2004
Location: NYC
Distribution: Slackware 10.0
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I've run both and I'd have to say I like Slackware better. No offense, but Ubuntu makes some boneheaded assumptions (like disabling desktop icons, no root user for no good reason, "Synchronizing clock to ntp.ubuntulinux.org" and many others) that you'll probably have to waste time disabling/correcting on your own. There were also a few issues I had with networking that I won't go into here. Note that this all applies to "Warty". Maybe I'm spoiled with Slackware's level of control, but if you install Ubuntu do it on a spare drive like I did, or you might be kicking yourself.
 
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Old 04-01-2005, 03:40 PM   #17
chbin
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Distribution: slackware-current
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Like I said once you dos you never go back.

Think about it, you can boot it from a floppy and maintaining it is easy as hell. Security is easy too since it's so damn small. Configuration is ridiculously easy cause you only got like 6 or 7 config files to worry about. All text config files too! You could run an md5sum on the main exe in case it gets out of line, easy to do.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 04:24 PM   #18
equinox
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But what does DOS have to do with the question being asked?
 
Old 04-01-2005, 04:26 PM   #19
egag
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Quote:
Originally posted by chbin
Like I said once you dos you never go back.

Think about it, you can boot it from a floppy and maintaining it is easy as hell. Security is easy too since it's so damn small. Configuration is ridiculously easy cause you only got like 6 or 7 config files to worry about. All text config files too! You could run an md5sum on the main exe in case it gets out of line, easy to do.
...and we all get a warm feeling remembering the greatest console-editor ever born : edlin !



edit : btw. : with Slackware you can buid an " ubuntu ",
but you'll have a hard time to to go the other way......


egag

Last edited by egag; 04-01-2005 at 04:30 PM.
 
Old 04-01-2005, 04:34 PM   #20
d00msweek
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Registered: Jan 2004
Location: Cebu City, Philippines
Distribution: Slackware 10,Gentoo 2005.1,LFS
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I think I'll stick to Slackware. I've used Slackware for over a year. ( Started using it on December 2003 ). But I'll still try Ubuntu. Thanks for the comments.
 
Old 04-02-2005, 04:19 AM   #21
AxelFendersson
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Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Darkest Oxfordshire
Distribution: Arch, Slackware
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Quote:
Quoth denning:
On ubuntu, you can't be root...
Yes you can. sudo passwd should allow you to set a root password, after which you can log in as root or su as normal.
 
Old 04-07-2005, 09:18 PM   #22
justaguynsrq
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Registered: Mar 2003
Location: Sarasota, FL
Distribution: Ubuntu : Hoary
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I was with slack for over 3 years, I tried Ubuntu, and am not going back. As a matter of fact, I liked it so well, I installed over slack AND XP. I find it the best distro, in my opinion, for many reasons. I am really appreciating the 2.6.10 kernel without having to install with fingers crossed, holding my breath, and closing my eyes! Hardware detection is advanced, processor performance : outstanding!

In line with what has already been stated, try it yourself. I WAS a "died-in-the-wool" KDE user until Gnome 2.10. I don't see any other distro besides what I have at this point in time.

Enough said ......................................
 
Old 04-07-2005, 10:24 PM   #23
reddazz
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Registered: Nov 2003
Location: N. E. England
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Quote:
Originally posted by AxelFendersson
Depends what you mean by 'better'. Ubuntu is arguably easier to use and manage than Slackware, and uses slightly more up-to-date packages, but doesn't have the underlying elegance and simplicity that Slackware does. They're different, and have different strengths and weaknesses, but I'd be reluctant to say either is outright better. It all depends on what you like.

The only way you can know for sure is to put Ubuntu on a second partition, give it a try, and see which you like better.
Your post isn't entirely accurate. With Slack, if you use current then the packages are usually a lot more upto date when compared to ubuntu. Once Ubuntu releases a stable release they only issue security updates, whereas using Slack current gives you bleeding edge packages.

Anyway they are both good distros, so it doesn't matter which distro somebody picks as long as it is Linux.
 
Old 04-08-2005, 07:36 AM   #24
ringwraith
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If you are going to use slack-current then you have to compare it with hoary not warty and remember we are talking about gnome. What version is slack current using for gnome 2.6. If you want 2.8 you have to go 3rd party. I think hoary is on 2.10. Having said all that. I tried ubuntu a couple times. It was okay. As some one else pointed out the root thing really is a nonissue. It is in their FAQ how to set up the root account. But then who reads the FAQ. I still use Slack and do run Linuce's gnome packages.
As to dos superior security. I would rather unplug the damn thing and put it in the closet. Pretty secure in there.
 
Old 04-08-2005, 07:59 AM   #25
Seiken
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Location: Canada
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I have only been using Linux for a couple of months. I went with Slackware, since it was the first one I was introduced to by a friend about 10 years ago.

Well... last night, I threw Ubuntu Hoary on a partition... man oh man, do I ever feel out of place in there. It makes me feel like I'm not using MY computer. It's like it's its own entity and it's just letting me use it. I'm still going to play around with it some more because the more I know the better, but I really can't see it staying there after I've learned what I need from it.
 
Old 04-08-2005, 10:12 AM   #26
perfect_circle
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Quote:
Originally posted by ringwraith
If you are going to use slack-current then you have to compare it with hoary not warty and remember we are talking about gnome. What version is slack current using for gnome 2.6. If you want 2.8 you have to go 3rd party. I think hoary is on 2.10. Having said all that. I tried ubuntu a couple times. It was okay. As some one else pointed out the root thing really is a nonissue. It is in their FAQ how to set up the root account. But then who reads the FAQ. I still use Slack and do run Linuce's gnome packages.
As to dos superior security. I would rather unplug the damn thing and put it in the closet. Pretty secure in there.
In case you haven't noticed, slackware-current has completelly dropped gnome. Gnome was not updated in 10.1 because it was planned to be dropped and 10.1 is an update of 10, and dramatic changes like dropping gnome should not be made in 10.1 but in 11.
 
Old 04-08-2005, 01:37 PM   #27
tuxombie
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Registered: Oct 2004
Location: Chennai, India
Distribution: Slackware 10, Ubuntu, Debian Sarge
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Slackware is much easier to use than Ubuntu. But really, it doesnt matter much after one configures it. Both Slackware and Ubuntu need very little post configuration -mostly the music bit. But I cant stand Ubuntu for this reason that it doesnt ship with some important packages like latex. Imagine a linux distribution without latex, this is almost demeaning! Why download when it is already there? And then again, compiling from source is clearer and probably as easy as apt-get.

We still have the same functionality with both distributions. Which is why I am still using Debian inspite of all the initial problems as I only need emacs and a browser and music and mplayer.

Bottom line: I would go back to some less painful thing like Fedora (nice distro, ugly but good to work) or Slackware when I get my laptop this fall.

Last edited by tuxombie; 04-08-2005 at 01:40 PM.
 
Old 04-08-2005, 01:39 PM   #28
Bwongar
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Registered: Apr 2005
Distribution: Slackware 10.1
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I say it depends on the application and what your style is. Our servers at work are running Ubuntu. I'd prefer them to be Slackware, but my boss is more comfortable with the Debian-style... Fine by me.

I have to admit as well that Aptitude is very easy to use and actually works!
 
Old 04-08-2005, 07:45 PM   #29
Franklin
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I've been using slack for over a year and like it very much -

That being said, after initially disliking ubuntu I have been using it more and more for 2 reasons:

1. Wacom Graphire3: still cannot get it to work properly in slack - ubuntu it works better than in windows.

2. Canon Powershot A95: In ubuntu, I plug it in and it is recognized and I get asked if I want to download the pictures and gtkam opens... just nice - again better than windows. Slackware, it works in root only and even then not very well.

I realize that eventually I could get these things to work in slack, but I really would rather play than fsck around with config files and read 30 page linuxwacom howto's after working a 10 hour day.

I dunno.... I'm not ready to unload slack but, given the choice between rtfm and playing ...
 
Old 04-09-2005, 03:20 AM   #30
masand
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well i can say that ubuntu is a good ditro provided u have a good internet connection to upgrade those packages

i do not like distros that simply do not want to play mp3s with the given setup,ubutu is one other than fedora
not everyone has access to internet connection at the site

regards
 
  


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