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Old 07-16-2003, 10:00 AM   #1
Nikon01
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Slackware suggested partition sizes?


Well first I don't really know too much about linux but I've got my feet a little wet w/ FreeBSD and was able to get that up and running but I'd like to use Slackware and I don't know what the suggested partitions are as well as the sizes. I know there is / and swap, etc. but I don't know what partitions to use and what size to assign them. I'd love suggestions for a 30 gig hd. I'd also like to a small walkthrough if anyone would be willing to write it because I'm still not comfortable w/ what primary and whatever else type of partitions there are.

In a recap I would like to know the partition names and sizes as well as how to create them. I'm using Slackware 9.0. TY for any help recieved.

Last edited by Nikon01; 07-16-2003 at 10:06 AM.
 
Old 07-16-2003, 10:13 AM   #2
Noryungi
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Start the installation of Slackware, and use "cfdisk" of "fdisk" to create the partitions. The only

Usually your swap partition should your RAM x2, or, if your RAM > 128 MB, your swap should be = to the size of the RAM. Ihave used this rule of thumb for many years and it works pretty well.

For a 30 MB, here is what I would create (but I am sure this can be improved with the suggestions of others on this forum):

/.......... around 1 GB should be more than enough.
swap.......... see above (for instance, 0.5 MB).
/usr.......... around 10-15 GB. Make it this size larger if you plan to compile & install a lot of software.
/home.......... the rest of the disk. Depends on what type of applications you are going to be running.

That's about it. I am sure that many others will have other suggestions, but this is (more or less) what I have been using on my 20GB HDD laptop, and it works great for me.

Hope this helps!
 
Old 07-16-2003, 10:31 AM   #3
trickykid
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This is how I setup one of my 30 GB drives also with a second 60GB drive for misc data using Slackware and for server use, no X or desktop installed:

First Primary /dev/hda:
/boot = 16MB
Swap = 200MB
/ = 500MB
/usr = 5GB
/tmp = 1GB
/var = 1GB
/home = Rest of Drive

Secondary /dev/hdb:
/data = Whole Drive
 
Old 07-16-2003, 11:24 AM   #4
Nikon01
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OK

So how would I go about making them root partitions and labeling them etc etc? All I can do is create different sized partitions and assign the swap. Do I need to do anything else? Should I just write with it setup as:

1 Linuxswap 512
2 Linux 1000
3 Linux 15000
4 Linux rest

or do I have to assign the opther partitions and what should I make bootable? Ty for the help guys =D

Last edited by Nikon01; 07-16-2003 at 11:48 AM.
 
Old 07-16-2003, 12:01 PM   #5
Noryungi
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Don't make the mistake of doing the same thing as you did under FreeBSD: under Linux, you create a partition, assign it a "type" (Linux Native/Linux Swap) a mount point (/, /usr, etc...) and indicate which one should be booted and you are done.

Under FreeBSD, you have to create a slice, and then do all the steps indicated above, if I remember well. Linux is more "forgiving" in that respect.

For more information, please read the Slackware manuals at:
http://www.slackware.com/book/

Especially the following part:
http://www.slackware.com/book/index....urce=x209.html
(look for "partitioning")

And the un-official updated book at:
http://slackbook.yoshiwara.org.uk/chapter4.html

Hope this helps...
 
Old 07-16-2003, 12:51 PM   #6
Nikon01
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I have now gotten to where I need to use the ADDSWAP thing and when I tell it yes it will just sit there and I can type stuff at the bottom that does nothing and it will just sit there. Any idea whats wrong?
 
Old 07-16-2003, 01:14 PM   #7
trickykid
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Quote:
Originally posted by Nikon01
I have now gotten to where I need to use the ADDSWAP thing and when I tell it yes it will just sit there and I can type stuff at the bottom that does nothing and it will just sit there. Any idea whats wrong?
Its usually formatting and checking for bad blocks. If your not formatting a huge partition, shouldn't take more than 2 minutes or so in most cases.

And also with Slackware to mention, after you created your partitions and types with fdisk or cfdisk, after the swap and turning swap on on the step you mentioned, it will then ask you which partition to use as "/" and then after that, what you wanted mounted as your other partitions created.
 
Old 07-17-2003, 04:24 AM   #8
Ivan
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Also be sure that you changed swap partition ID from hex83 (linux default) to hex82 (swap).
 
Old 07-17-2003, 09:22 AM   #9
Kocil
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Hello.
I'm on a notebook, and does not have a real estate hard disk.
So this is a minimalist partitions I made.

hda1 = 2 MB, for windows (I dual boot this machine)
hda2 = 512 MB, linux swap. The formula for swap is 2 x RAM, or max 512 MB. The tip is to put swap on the front of hard disk for better performance.
hda3 = 500 MB, linux /. This would be enough for /boot, /etc, /home (personal), /tmp, /var. From my experience, keeping this partitions small would increase performance (mainly because of the temp).
hda4 = extended partition (the rest of the disk, all of the rest partitions will be inside this)
hda5 = 1 GB, DOS drive D:. I also mount this from linux for shared data
hda6 = 2 GB, /usr. This will contains the linux applications. So far, it have been used up to 60%.
hda7 = 1 GB, /opt. Slackware puts /kde on this directory. I also puts non standard apps here (like Java).
hda8 = not used.

Thats all for personal use.
If you want to use it for server, you may want to make another partitions for /var (since it holds the logs, and usually http data that grows).

Totally you can play full slackware with only 5 GB.
How about the rest of the harddisk ?
Maybe you can use it for other distribution or BSD
Just expand the hda8.

Last edited by Kocil; 07-17-2003 at 09:26 AM.
 
  


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