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Old 01-26-2012, 10:56 AM   #16
Jeebizz
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Thumbs up /var /home and /tmp in HDD


Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
One more thing, /var should also be on the HDD.
Yea thought so too! /var /home and /tmp can go on the conventional drive, since the logic is sound. I almost forgot that the sys log itself would be in /var too. No need to put that on the SSD obviously .
 
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Old 01-26-2012, 11:04 AM   #17
onebuck
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Hi,

Old reference that is still useful to take notice: http://cptl.org/wp/index.php/2010/03...ives-in-linux/

I like the Patriot forum & Intel Support Community.

edit: Onebuck SSD participation threads links that have loads of reference links and discussion in post #24
HTH!

Last edited by onebuck; 01-26-2012 at 05:27 PM. Reason: edit to show links
 
Old 01-26-2012, 12:17 PM   #18
Jeebizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Onebuck SSD participation threads that have loads of reference links and discussion.
HTH!
Nothing shows up on that link,
 
Old 01-26-2012, 12:27 PM   #19
rg3
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I currently run Slackware on an SSD. I wouldn't recommend using anything other than ext4 as the filesystem because it's stable and supports TRIM, which is very important to maintain the performance of the drive over time. I tweaked things a little bit like using the "noatime" mount option too, setting the IO scheduler to "noop" for that drive, using tmpfs for /tmp and compiling things in there, and keeping the Firefox cache on /tmp too. It could also be disabled if you have a fast Internet connection. I did not bother to use a HDD for /var and I'm not sure it's really worth it. Not much gets written in there and, if it does, like files downloaded by a package manager or a database, I'm pretty sure you're interested in the performance benefit.

My two cents.
 
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Old 01-26-2012, 03:36 PM   #20
Cheesesteak
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Arch's wiki has some good info about optimizing for an SSD... though it sounds like most of it has been mentioned in this thread already:

link
 
Old 01-26-2012, 03:48 PM   #21
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rg3 View Post
I currently run Slackware on an SSD. I wouldn't recommend using anything other than ext4 as the filesystem because it's stable and supports TRIM, which is very important to maintain the performance of the drive over time. I tweaked things a little bit like using the "noatime" mount option too, setting the IO scheduler to "noop" for that drive, using tmpfs for /tmp and compiling things in there, and keeping the Firefox cache on /tmp too. It could also be disabled if you have a fast Internet connection. I did not bother to use a HDD for /var and I'm not sure it's really worth it. Not much gets written in there and, if it does, like files downloaded by a package manager or a database, I'm pretty sure you're interested in the performance benefit.

My two cents.
Just to add something to it: I also moved the Thunderbird profile directory to my data partition to limit the number of writes on it. I receive quite a lot of emails every day so I thought it'd be a good idea. Having said that, it seems that realistically speaking wearing out of SSDs is slowly becoming a non-issue with new models.
 
Old 01-26-2012, 03:55 PM   #22
Jeebizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
Just to add something to it: I also moved the Thunderbird profile directory to my data partition to limit the number of writes on it.
I thought the Thunderbird profile directory would be in the /home directory (/home/user/.thunderbird), in which case would be stored on a conventional drive, rather than the SSD unless I am missing something and that directory is not in /home but somewhere else?
 
Old 01-26-2012, 04:03 PM   #23
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeebizz View Post
I thought the Thunderbird profile directory would be in the /home directory (/home/user/.thunderbird), in which case would be stored on a conventional drive, rather than the SSD unless I am missing something and that directory is not in /home but somewhere else?
Sorry, I didn't explain it clearly. I keep my "data" on a standard SATA drive (mounted under /home/sycamorex/data). I moved Thunderbird profile dir to /home/sycamorex/data... by specifying the following in /home/sycamorex/.thunderbird/profiles.ini:
Code:
[General]
StartWithLastProfile=1
[Profile0]
Name=default
IsRelative=0
Path=/home/sycamorex/data/config/thunder/0jpmvl6a.default
That's where a lot of info gets written every day.
 
Old 01-26-2012, 05:25 PM   #24
onebuck
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Hi,

Sorry about that, forgot about the timeout.

Here are some of the links;
 
Old 01-27-2012, 07:14 AM   #25
mlpa
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There is a post with several optimizations on SSD.

Hope it helps.
 
Old 01-27-2012, 11:41 AM   #26
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlpa View Post
There is a post with several optimizations on SSD.

Hope it helps.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlpa View Post
Hi, this is my fstab:
Quote:
/dev/sda6 swap swap defaults 0 0
/dev/sda5 / ext4 defaults,discard,noatime,nodiratime 1 1
/dev/sda2 /media/Windows ntfs-3g discard,umask=000 1 0
#/dev/cdrom /mnt/cdrom auto noauto,owner,ro 0 0
/dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy auto noauto,owner 0 0
devpts /dev/pts devpts gid=5,mode=620 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
tmpfs /dev/shm tmpfs defaults 0 0
none /tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0
none /var/log tmpfs defaults 0 0
none /var/tmp tmpfs defaults 0 0
<snip>
You do not need 'nodiratime' in your 'fstab' since it is part of 'noatime'.

Another point for 'swap' is to use and placing in '/etc/rc.d/rc.local' : 'echo 1 >/proc/sys/vm/swappiness' to limit swap. Default swappiness in Slackware is '60'. Even with today's large memory footprint, I like to keep a swap.

As the memory gets >=8GB then consider locating high read/write operations in memory or if you prefer a physical HDD at the cost of time.

You can also maximize performance by using and placing in '/etc/rc.d/rc.local'; 'echo 50 > /proc/sys/vm/vfs_cache_pressure'. Slackware default for '/proc/sys/vm/vfs_cache_pressure' is '100'.

Note: Plus be sure to use & where X=a,b.c..: 'tune2fs -o discard /dev/sdX' if you do not use 'discard' in 'fstab'.

If you have 'SSD' & 'HDD' in the system then you can use 'noop' scheduler and can be placed in '/etc/rc.d/rc.local': 'echo noop > /sys/block/sdX/queue/scheduler' ( where 'X' is a,b,c,d,e....)

Slackware default is [cfg] scheduler. You can verify this by 'cat /sys/block/sdX/queue/scheduler' that will show the contents for the scheduler in use will be in [cfg] brackets (where 'X' is a,b,c,d,e....).
You will see other available schedulers from the output of 'cat /sys/block/sda/queue/scheduler'.

If you are worried that udev may assign different '/dev/' node to drive(s) because of kernel updates,system upgrade, etc. You should take the means to assign 'noop' to the correct device and place this in '/etc/rc.d/rc.local';
Code:
This code snippet from ArchWiki;

SSD=(device ID's of all 'SSD': see note below)

declare -i i=0
while [ "${SSD[$i]}" != "" ]; do
  NODE=`ls -l /dev/disk/by-id/${SSD[$i]} | awk '{ print $NF }' | sed -e 's/[/\.]//g'`
  echo noop > /sys/block/$NODE/queue/scheduler
  i=i+1
done
Code:
Note Information revised from ArchWiki;

This provides the links listed with targets information to place in bash array 'SSD= ( ) parentheses in above 'SSD= ( );

ls -l /dev/disk/by-id
lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root  9 2012-01-25 10:01 ata-INTEL_SSDSA2M040G2GC_CVGB0320007N040NGN -> ../../sda

Place 'ata-INTEL_SSDSA2M040G2GC_CVGB0320007N040NGN'

into the bash array 'SSD= (ata-INTEL_SSDSA2M040G2GC_CVGB0320007N040NGN)'
You can place all system target ID for 'SSD' in the bash array. Each ID should be space separated.

Caution Note:
You should only switch the scheduler to 'noop' for the 'SSD(s)' in the system. You should keep the 'cfg' scheduler for all other physical 'HHD' in the system. Some say to use 'deadline' but for a 'SSD' device that has no mechanical heads or spinning disks actions to introduce delay then no advantage for 'deadline' over 'noop' which is 'FIFO' queue.

Sometimes you may need to completely reset 'SSD' cells to factory state. 'TRIM' can degrade performance over time on some 'SSD', even ones that support native 'TRIM'. I suggest to get 'SSD' utilities from the drive manufacture. Manufactures usually provide utilities along with firmware upgrades but not always.

Partition Schemes for 'SSD' are always debated. Personally I think that the 'longevity' of the SSD can be extended by placing active partitions like '/var' on a physical HDD rather than on a 'SSD'. '/tmp' can be treated in the same way.

Nothing saying you cannot setup highly active partitions on a 'SSD' when the 'SSD' is optimized properly. 'SSD' longevity is increasing for newer devices. For me a 'SSD' that lasts for 5-8 years is longer than the system usage lifetime for my hardware.

Everyone should select the type of 'SSD' selected, be it synchronous 'SLC' ($$$)or asynchronous 'MLC'($). Each has advantages and disadvantages. Some manufactures are keeping the costs down by using asynchronous 'MLC' with a known good processor controller(i.e.; SandForce is widely used). Maximized performance can be had by synchronous 'SLC' and known good controller 'SandForce'. But you will pay for those advantages on a SandForce synchronous 'SLC' based 'SSD'.

Densities are getting better for 'MLC' at a much lower cost for consumer grade 'SSD'. So unless you have the mission critical performance needs that are provided by a SandForce synchronous 'SLC' based 'SSD' at a much greater cost then my suggestion is to select a premium grade SandForce asynchronous 'MLC' based 'SSD' device at a lower cost. I like 'Patriot SSD' while others prefer 'OCZ SSD'.

I buy computer systems all the time as the need fits. Just purchased another refurbished Dell Laptop at a great cost savings. My old Dell Laptop(5 years old) is still functional (LQ machine) and will continue to be used but for other duties. Placed a Patriot PyroSE 60GB drive in the new Dell Laptop. Still doing a lot of tweaking for this system with Slackware64 -current. Most of this 'SSD' information is based on the tweaking of the 'SSD' in the New & Old Dell laptops. So much information out there on 'SSD' usage. Some FUD, while some factual and useful from LQ, manufactures & wikis'.

Note: Be very careful with mixing old & new 'SSD' advice & information. I will revise this as I continue benchmarking and tweaking the New Dell Laptop w/Patriot PyroSE SSD. Also will place revisions in So you want to be a Slacker! What do I do next?

Buyer be-aware!

But: "No man ever yet became great by imitation." -Samuel Johnson

HTH!

Last edited by onebuck; 01-27-2012 at 02:11 PM. Reason: add scheduler links that were ommitted by editor. Edit2 typo
 
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Old 07-17-2012, 09:26 PM   #27
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Hi,

I really do not like to resurrect old threads. But: For some 'SSD' you can get some additional gain by setting up a write-back cache. Not all 'SSD' support this feature. No harm to try it as root from the 'cli';
Code:
~#hdparm -W1 /dev/sdx   #where x= a,b,c,d...
If you do not get any errors from the above command then your 'SSD' supports 'write-back'. You can add the command to the '/etc/rc.d/rc.local' file with the other 'SSD' setup commands.

You can turn it off with;
Code:
~#hdparm -W0 /dev/sdx   #where x= a,b,c,d...
Quote:
excerpt from 'man hdparm';
-W Get/set the IDE/SATA drive´s write-caching feature.
Check your 'SSD' manufacture specifications.
 
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Old 07-17-2012, 11:44 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeebizz View Post
Been a while since I posted in this forum...

Anyways, since I'm slowly (and finally) getting on my way in getting a new computer, I have been researching SSDs to supplement my new system. I was considering installing Slackware on an SSD and leave a conventional hard drive just for general storage.

So I am wondering what is everyone's opinions/experiences with Slackware on an SSD, and most importantly what type of filesystems are appropriate for an SSD?
SSDs are not that great of a technology. SSDs use data cells to store data like a flash drive. Over time and repeated usage, these do wear out and you will lose data and storage space. For the price you pay for an SSD losing data isn't worth the extra money you spend. Yes, booting fast is nice, but it's not worth the extra problems SSDs bring.

Stick to HDD drives. It's cheaper, they last longer, and they work better.
 
Old 07-18-2012, 03:12 AM   #29
Cheesesteak
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Don't buy a hard drive. They are electro-mechanical, and the mechanical parts wear out. If the mechanical parts don't get you, faulty firmware will. They're doomed to fail. C'mon...

The naysayers fear that your drive will wear out in what seems like a matter of months. Hard drives aren't what they used to be either. Just about any consumer hard drive you buy today will only come with a 1-year warranty. Go back to the mid-90's, and many drives had a 3 or 5 year warranty. Are you telling me they're so reliable these days, you don't need a decent warranty? I don't think so.

I have an SSD and a hard drive in my laptop. I'm happy with the SSD. The prices are coming down, and each generation improves upon the previous. Just do your homework, just as you would with any other purchase.
 
Old 07-18-2012, 05:14 AM   #30
guanx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesesteak View Post
Don't buy a hard drive. They are electro-mechanical, and the mechanical parts wear out. If the mechanical parts don't get you, faulty firmware will. They're doomed to fail. C'mon...
The red text alone is a perfect description of SSD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheesesteak View Post
The naysayers fear that your drive will wear out in what seems like a matter of months. Hard drives aren't what they used to be either. Just about any consumer hard drive you buy today will only come with a 1-year warranty. Go back to the mid-90's, and many drives had a 3 or 5 year warranty. Are you telling me they're so reliable these days, you don't need a decent warranty? I don't think so.

I have an SSD and a hard drive in my laptop. I'm happy with the SSD. The prices are coming down, and each generation improves upon the previous. Just do your homework, just as you would with any other purchase.
With the money for an Intel 320 Series SSD of 160 GB, I can buy four 7200 rpm HDDs of 500 GB each, three as backups. How can the latter be less reliable for normal usage?
 
  


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