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-   -   Slackware install from Usb? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-install-from-usb-4175501406/)

IwannaSlack 04-11-2014 10:28 PM

Slackware install from Usb?
 
Here is my small problem I have a computer 120gig hardrive 1gig of ram its pretty old and not that fast. I decided I will use it for slackware and my school work. I've previously installed it a long time ago from a cd and it was so straight forward now trying to boot it from the usb and then have it install from the same usb into on to the hardrive I'm having problems. I'm running the installation from the usb but I can't get it to install on to the hardrive from the usb. Unless I'm blind there also seems to be no auto-detect for the usb.

help please :\ laptop just sitting here looking for a response. P

Presently I have

sda1 - 3gigs Primary Swap
sda2 - boot Primary Linux 15gigs
sda3 - Primary 102gigs the rest

IwannaSlack 04-11-2014 10:38 PM

installing completely forgot about fdisk -l lol I hope I am doing this right.. If it fails I'm coming back.

IwannaSlack 04-11-2014 10:44 PM

it failed I dont even know what went wrong.

maciuszek 04-11-2014 11:20 PM

How did "it failed"?
Expand

KeithE 04-11-2014 11:32 PM

Did you set the BIOS so that it can boot from a USB drive (some BIOSes consider the USB drive to be a hard drive - check the booting section of the BIOS)? Some older machines cannot do so, in which case you're stuck with using the CD or DVD drive.

How did you create the bootable USB drive? Unetbootin can create a bootable USB from a downloaded Slackware (or any other distro) DVD image. Unetbootin runs in Linux or Windows.

If it does boot, make sure you partition the drive as you want it with FDISK or CFDISK (the latter is more user-friendly but both work) before running setup. I always use 3 partitions - RAM x 2 for swap on these older boxes, 20 Gb for /, and the rest for /home, but how you do it is up to you.

A PC running any kind of semi-modern processor (Pentium 3 or better) with a 120 Gb hard drive and 1 Gb of RAM should be able to run Slackware just fine, although KDE will be slow on a machine with that little memory.

IwannaSlack 04-12-2014 01:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KeithE (Post 5151073)
Did you set the BIOS so that it can boot from a USB drive (some BIOSes consider the USB drive to be a hard drive - check the booting section of the BIOS)? Some older machines cannot do so, in which case you're stuck with using the CD or DVD drive.

How did you create the bootable USB drive? Unetbootin can create a bootable USB from a downloaded Slackware (or any other distro) DVD image. Unetbootin runs in Linux or Windows.

If it does boot, make sure you partition the drive as you want it with FDISK or CFDISK (the latter is more user-friendly but both work) before running setup. I always use 3 partitions - RAM x 2 for swap on these older boxes, 20 Gb for /, and the rest for /home, but how you do it is up to you.

A PC running any kind of semi-modern processor (Pentium 3 or better) with a 120 Gb hard drive and 1 Gb of RAM should be able to run Slackware just fine, although KDE will be slow on a machine with that little memory.


it crashes in the middle of the installation like it ran out of space. I dont even understand why?!! I'm going to try again.. and maybe I can provide a picture.

Didier Spaier 04-12-2014 04:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IwannaSlack (Post 5151119)
it crashes in the middle of the installation like it ran out of space.

Maybe it did. How much RAM do you have? Quoted from the installer's help file:
Code:

SWAP SPACE

If your machine doesn't have much memory, you might have already
learned how to activate a swap partition just to make it this far.
Normally you won't need to format or activate your swap space by
hand, but if you're installing on a machine with low memory you will
need to format and activate a swap partition to be able to install.
Once you've made the partition with fdisk, you need to use 'mkswap'
on it, and then activate it with 'swapon'.  Checking the partition
table with 'fdisk -l', we see these lines:

  Device Boot      Start        End      Blocks  Id  System
/dev/sda8          16650      16898    2000061  82  Linux swap

So, the command to format would be:

  # mkswap /dev/sda8
  # sync

And to activate it:

  # swapon /dev/sda8



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