LinuxQuestions.org
Visit Jeremy's Blog.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 04-21-2014, 12:51 AM   #61
cwizardone
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current & "True Multilib." PC-BSD.
Posts: 2,269

Rep: Reputation: 186Reputation: 186

Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman View Post
I think Zorin is used by Ken Starks in his computers-for-kids foundation...
I just stumbled across this, quite by accident. Apparently, Reglue is using the Solus OS.

http://www.reglue.org/prompr.html


The Solus OS web site doesn't seem to work, at least not at the moment, so here is the DistroWatch listing:

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=solusos

Which, BTW, says Solus has been discontinued, so maybe they have switched to Zorin and haven't updated their web site. I can't find much about Zorin and they have deleted their Wikipedia page, which makes me somewhat suspicious (yes, I'm slightly paranoid ).

Last edited by cwizardone; 04-21-2014 at 12:57 AM.
 
Old 04-22-2014, 02:13 PM   #62
Bertman123
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64 bit MLED with KDE
Posts: 243

Rep: Reputation: 32
I've noticed that any (former) windows users like having some kind of notification of when there are updates available. Other ditros such as linux mint and ubuntu (to some degree) offer those. I tend to want to check whenever I want to. but I could see where others might look for something to pop up on their desktop letting them know if an update is available (at the very least).
 
Old 04-22-2014, 02:18 PM   #63
moisespedro
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Location: Brazil
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 1,138

Rep: Reputation: 151Reputation: 151
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bertman123 View Post
I've noticed that any (former) windows users like having some kind of notification of when there are updates available. Other ditros such as linux mint and ubuntu (to some degree) offer those. I tend to want to check whenever I want to. but I could see where others might look for something to pop up on their desktop letting them know if an update is available (at the very least).
We have Slackware mailing list instead
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-22-2014, 02:21 PM   #64
cwizardone
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current & "True Multilib." PC-BSD.
Posts: 2,269

Rep: Reputation: 186Reputation: 186
For Slackware there are these mailing lists:

http://www.slackware.com/lists/

Slackbuilds:

http://lists.slackbuilds.org/

You can also subscribe to Alien Bob's mail list (blog) and various applications offer a "automatic check for updates" feature.

Edit in: I see moisespedro beat me to it.

Last edited by cwizardone; 04-22-2014 at 02:29 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-22-2014, 02:44 PM   #65
Bertman123
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64 bit MLED with KDE
Posts: 243

Rep: Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by moisespedro View Post
We have Slackware mailing list instead
I completely agree and like slackware's approach to things. I'm more of a computer nerd than most of the windows users I know who don't want to know how it works as long as it works and is updated. For those people I would probably recommend linux mint a it is also a good distro and has a nifty button that tell them when there are updates available. :-p
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 04-22-2014, 02:57 PM   #66
cwizardone
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Distribution: Slackware64-current & "True Multilib." PC-BSD.
Posts: 2,269

Rep: Reputation: 186Reputation: 186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bertman123 View Post
...linux mint a it is also a good distro and has a nifty button that tell them when there are updates available. :-p
PC-BSD does something like that. It automatically logs you on to your Internet connection (something I don't like) and one for first things it does, automatically, is check for updates to the system and any packages you installed using their "pbi" package system. Rather clever, but, as I said, I don't like being automatically logged on and I don't like be "on" all the time. You can "disable" the connection, but when go to reconnect it takes a while and, for whatever reason, the connection is never as good as it was when you first signed on.
 
Old 04-22-2014, 03:29 PM   #67
Bertman123
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64 bit MLED with KDE
Posts: 243

Rep: Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by cwizardone View Post
PC-BSD does something like that. It automatically logs you on to your Internet connection (something I don't like) and one for first things it does, automatically, is check for updates to the system and any packages you installed using their "pbi" package system. Rather clever, but, as I said, I don't like being automatically logged on and I don't like be "on" all the time. You can "disable" the connection, but when go to reconnect it takes a while and, for whatever reason, the connection is never as good as it was when you first signed on.
I would agree there... I wouldn't want to be automatically logged in either. I do kind of like linux mint's philosophy of updating, though and I can see where having something on the desktop tell you when there's an update could be a good thing, though I like the way slackware is updated more than anything.
 
Old 04-22-2014, 04:29 PM   #68
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 3,482

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534
Quote:
We have Slackware mailing list instead
I see your huge smiley, meaning the comment was intended as tongue-in-cheek.

Quote:
For Slackware there are these mailing lists:
For those who jumped into this thread mid stream, the TL;DR summary is the statement misses the point of the original post and this thread.

That said, yes mailing lists serve the same purpose as update notifiers. A nominal difference is the update notifier has a built-in mechanism to proceed with updates.

Quote:
I would agree there... I wouldn't want to be automatically logged in either.
I don't believe update notifiers "log in" anywhere. These notifiers just sync package databases. Regarding automatic logging in by the system, most distros nowadays use Network Manager and are configured to start that app when logging in. I suppose that could be changed but seems obtuse to me. I am considered a privacy zealot by those who know me and even I have my Slackware system start my network automatically when booting the system.

While we Slackers are content doing things manually, the type of users to whom were are catering don't. These types of users are the focus of this thread. Most of these users will choose convenience any day over any other concern or issue. This is pretty much the tired old adage about driving cars. Most people don't care how a car works, they just want to drive. Likewise with computers.

That observation has tempered my perspective. As I continue moving forward with tweaking a base system for such users, I try hard to do everything without a terminal. Everything must be done with the mouse. Even keyboard shortcuts are low on the proverbial totem pole because these types of users don't use them. Approaching a computer in this manner has been an interesting challenge for me, but I am learning.

Using a computer in this manner is a huge challenge to just about any Slacker, who tend to be old school in their approach to computer usage. This venture sure has been an eye-opener for me.

A simple example: I have not yet decided whether to deliver systems with basic security and privacy web browser add-ons. Do I push my philosophies on users or just give them a naked web browser? Such simple decisions get messy.

This venture is not about, "I am perfectly content with the Slackware Way." I am content with Slackware too and am typing this on a Slackware 14 system. The two computers sitting next to me are not Slackware and everything has been configured for the GUI experience. I have been working days straight at this.

That too is a discussion point embedded within this thread. Could a full GUI experience distro be created using Slackware as a base? Yes, of course, but nobody has done that. The further I proceed in this venture the more I realize how much work is involved to massage a Slackware base into such a distro. Fundamentally, any distro. I am interested to see how my journal/diary looks in about six months.
 
Old 04-22-2014, 05:03 PM   #69
perbh
Member
 
Registered: May 2008
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 261

Rep: Reputation: 40
take it from a true distro-hoe ...
linuxmint-xfce
I just l-o-v-e the 'bottom-panel only' and have copied this to all other xfce's (including slackware) - ok, so its reminiscent of XP - I don't care - it's what _I_ like and its what _I_ use.
I still believe that the mint-xfce is about the closest you can get to 'standard windows'. I have been successful in converting diehard windows-users to this - but failed with my SO which has completely fallen for the fud - 98% of the people cant be wrong!! (and then she complains almost nightly about how bad it is *LOL*)
 
Old 04-23-2014, 05:00 AM   #70
Smokey_justme
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 400

Rep: Reputation: 113Reputation: 113
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman View Post
That said, yes mailing lists serve the same purpose as update notifiers. A nominal difference is the update notifier has a built-in mechanism to proceed with updates.
Agreed.. The mailing list fits Slackware better since mailing-lists have the advantage of notifying both a sys-admin with dozens of computers under his wing or a normal desktop user.. It isn't the best fit for desktop GUIs..

One could also choose to do stuff like this.. With minimal programing knowledge, this should be fairly easy to extend into a notification on the desktop (one can use even a simply bash script with notify-send)...


Quote:
A simple example: I have not yet decided whether to deliver systems with basic security and privacy web browser add-ons. Do I push my philosophies on users or just give them a naked web browser? Such simple decisions get messy.
I would suggest you to push your philosophies since they have rather high security implications.. Think of AdBlock plus and Disconnect.. Both of them should keep browsing pretty safe without actually interfering with the relevant content of the web-page.. If they stumble upon a site that has a problem, better to jump on you at that point, then be exposed to all kind of crap, malware and exploits..

Quote:
That too is a discussion point embedded within this thread. Could a full GUI experience distro be created using Slackware as a base? Yes, of course, but nobody has done that. The further I proceed in this venture the more I realize how much work is involved to massage a Slackware base into such a distro. Fundamentally, any distro. I am interested to see how my journal/diary looks in about six months.
SalixOS and MLED are both a major step in making a Slackware desktop for normal end-users.. Try them, at least to steal some ideeas :P.. They are derived from Slackware and both are fully compatible with it..
 
Old 04-23-2014, 12:54 PM   #71
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 3,482

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534
Quote:
take it from a true distro-hoe ... linuxmint-xfce
For now we have settled on LMDE. No 'buntu infrastructure. The semi-rolling release keeps the system reasonably updated in a controlled manner without semi-annual updates or the stagnation of an LTS release. LMDE does not come in a pure Xfce version, but a former community version is now available as SolydX. I have nominally tested SolydX, but I am not much of an Xfce fan. Compared to resource usage Mate is equivalent and to me is a fuller desktop. IMO Caja and Nemo are superior to Thunar.

Through the years I have found that no distro hits a perfect sweet spot and every desktop environment has its shortcomings and bugs. As I have shared elsewhere in this forum, the trick is to find the software that sucks the least and cause the least pain.

Quote:
Try them, at least to steal some ideas
I am aware of both projects. Both provide some of the elements needed for a GUI-centric system. I am going to try to learn Debian and Mint as well as I have Slackware. Many of the Mint tools and add-ons are written in Python, which means they already have a decent foundation for portability to other distros.

Cinnamon seems to be the fun, new kid on the block receiving lots of developer attention. I'd like to see Cinnamon go mainstream in Slackware, perhaps become available in /extra or replace Xfce in trunk and Xfce moved to /extra. Or at least become a slackbuilds.org staple.
 
Old 04-23-2014, 01:15 PM   #72
Smokey_justme
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2009
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 400

Rep: Reputation: 113Reputation: 113
I'm pretty sure Cinnamon will never replace Xfce and it shouldn't.. They're different in many aspects... But, it would be a great addition in the extra.. However, since not even MATE made it there, I doubt Cinnamon will.. There is however a thread requesting testing for build of Cinnamon on Slackware..

Btw, those two we're just examples of distros.. There is also Vector Linux, Slax, Zenwalk, and many more that have gone a bit further away than those with respect of compatibility with Slackware... But they are full-fledged desktop-focused distributions.. Some have almost (or maybe all) the requirements you searched for in post 1.. They are, however, simply not Slackware anymore :P
 
Old 04-24-2014, 07:51 AM   #73
Bertman123
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64 bit MLED with KDE
Posts: 243

Rep: Reputation: 32
I'm using MLED right now and highly recommend it!
 
Old 04-30-2014, 11:31 AM   #74
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.1
Posts: 3,482

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534Reputation: 534
Note to self: Zenwalk has a GUI package manager.
 
Old 04-30-2014, 10:37 PM   #75
Bertman123
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2010
Distribution: Slackware 14.1 64 bit MLED with KDE
Posts: 243

Rep: Reputation: 32
pclinuxos has, in my opinion, a good update notifier. I lets the user know that there are updates, but then it is up to then to go install the updates.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
yum association between "Administration Tools" and @admin-tools qwkfish Linux - General 2 03-21-2012 05:14 PM
System admin tools siawash Ubuntu 4 07-07-2011 11:22 PM
Would you like to see more graphical tools in Slackware? sahko Slackware 93 10-11-2010 02:34 AM
mysql admin tools sunhui Linux - Software 2 05-09-2007 01:20 AM
Admin tools juno Linux - Software 3 10-03-2002 06:16 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:25 AM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration