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-   -   Slackware Dependencies and my old blog post (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-dependencies-and-my-old-blog-post-4175496845/)

ruario 03-03-2014 06:56 AM

Slackware Dependencies and my old blog post
 
As of today my employer closed down their free social network and blogging site, a.k.a. "My Opera" and hence my old blog is gone.

I mention this because from time to time a few people here (e.g. Didier Spaier, GazL, TobiSGD, etc.) referenced a post I once made about Slackware and dependencies.

Anyway, for those interested, just before "My Opera" shutdown I submitted all my old blog posts to The Internet Archive for prosperity (and yes I made a donation!). Which means if you want to reference the post in the future you can use the following URL:

web.archive.org/web/20140303100105/http://my.opera.com/ruario/blog/2011/09/26/slackware-package-and-dependency-management

Sorry if this post feels like shameless self promotion but others have referenced the post in the past and I assume they might want to again.

brianL 03-03-2014 07:33 AM

Thanks, Ruari. It's a good article.

Alien Bob 03-03-2014 07:42 AM

If you don't mind Ruario, I have made a copy here because it complements the Slackware documentation nicely: http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:..._off_slackware

What do you want me to do with the comments on that blog? Just mention them on the Wiki page or copy/paste them to the "talk" section?

Eric

ruario 03-03-2014 07:47 AM

@AlienBob: I certainly do not mind at all. In fact thanks!

With regards to any of my comments I am more than happy for you to use them any way you see fit, so please feel free to do whatever you feel makes most sense.

allend 03-03-2014 07:53 AM

+1 for having that very worthy article at the Slackware Documentation Project.

perbh 03-03-2014 02:08 PM

I wish R's article could be put up at the top - permanently.
I had read it before, but revisited it - 'ts a great article! Kudos!

Xsane 03-03-2014 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 5127971)
... Slackware documentation nicely: http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:..._off_slackware ...

Quote:

Finally, create a compressed tar archive with version 1.13 style directory formatting, either by using GNU tar-1.13 directly (it is installed on Slackware) or by forcing modern GNU tar to emulate this style of formatting by using a transform: “tar caf /tmp/some-application-1.0-x86_64-1.tgz . –xform='s,^\./\(.\),\1,' ”
Or just use the --format=gnu tar option? Why doesn't Pat use that instead of a separate package?

Richard Cranium 03-04-2014 12:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Xsane (Post 5128489)
Or just use the --format=gnu tar option? Why doesn't Pat use that instead of a separate package?

If I remember correctly: Once Upon A Time, that didn't work.

ruario 03-04-2014 02:10 AM

It still doesn't, --format=gnu is irrelevant. Creation with tar 1.13 is all about how sub directory names are stored when adding a directory as '.'

Consider the following examples:

Code:

$ tar-1.13 cvf /tmp/test-1.13.tar .
./
testdir/
testdir/somefile

Code:

$ tar-1.26 cvf /tmp/test-1.26.tar .
./
./testdir/
./testdir/somefile

Code:

$ tar-1.26 cvf /tmp/test-1.26.tar . --xform='s,^\./\(.\),\1,' --show-stored-names
./
testdir/
testdir/somefile

GNU Tar 1.13 (or with my transform) store the subdirectory as testdir/, while GNU Tar 1.14 and above store it as ./testdir/. Pkgtools expects the former, not the later.

If you want to find out more about why GNU Tar 1.13 is used (this is not the only reason), read this thread.

ruario 03-04-2014 02:26 AM

By the way, this is why I said in my post that people should really use just use pkgtools (makepkg) for creation. Slackware packages are just tar files so it is possible to do stuff without makepkg but not everyone understands these little intricacies.

I must admit that sometimes in my own scripts I don't use makepkg but I got into this habit because I used to have a script that automatically made Slackware packages of Opera internal builds on a non-Slackware (Debian) machine. This would allow me to instantly fetch the latest internal build from my work desktop or home machine without having to do a local repack. Of course the first time I tried to do this I made a broken package (and the second time) but after that I did some investigation and realised what I had to do. Now I have a few public scripts (e.g. latest-chrome) that also do this as it allows me to make use of tar's --user and --owner options to make packages that have root owned files, even when run as a normal user.

moisespedro 03-10-2014 05:33 PM

I was thinking about translating this article and posting it under www.vivaolinux.com.br, a brazilian linux community. Since I didn't find any info on your blog I have to ask: would you mind if I do it?

Alien Bob 03-11-2014 01:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by moisespedro (Post 5132253)
I was thinking about translating this article and posting it under www.vivaolinux.com.br, a brazilian linux community. Since I didn't find any info on your blog I have to ask: would you mind if I do it?

Why don't you just translate the Slackware Wiki page and tell your friends about it?

http://docs.slackware.com/start?id=p..._off_slackware would be that page.

Eric

ruario 03-11-2014 02:38 PM

No I don't mind, in fact If you want me to state license I guess I would go with CC Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported. It seems like a reasonable license to me and the Slackware Wiki uses it as its default.

P.S. I would also prefer you went with AlienBob's suggestion and did your translation on the Slackware wiki itself. ;)

moisespedro 03-11-2014 04:58 PM

If I ever do the translation (it is a huge post and my english isn't that good) I will post on both


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