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Old 10-24-2005, 04:01 PM   #1
desertViking
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Slackware Current Question


Hi,

I am currently running Slackware 10.2. I've been very pleased with the results so far and managed most of my configuration and administrative needs.

One thing that I am trying to learn about is the concept of "Slackware current". Would someone be able to point me at some documentation that explains sort of what this means and how to use it?

Are there pro's and con's that you might be willing to share?

I've installed several packages from source. Is that a problem?

I did a brief google and came up with the slackware current version tree, but I'm not sure where to go from there.

Thx in advance for pointing me in the right direction :->

Kind regards
 
Old 10-24-2005, 04:27 PM   #2
Netizen
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Slackware current, is simply that. The latest and greatest Slackware...the "bleeding edge" if you will.

The biggest issue that usually comes up is simply the packages may be "new" or and some are still being tested so they may more prone to crashes, however, you most likely will not have any issues. Most will tell you that current is ok for desktops but should not be used on any servers in production.


Last edited by Netizen; 10-24-2005 at 04:28 PM.
 
Old 10-24-2005, 04:36 PM   #3
Alien Bob
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Slackware -current is the development effort towards the next stable release of SLackware.
This means that you can install slackware-current someday, only to find out that things do no longer work. If you want try running SLackware -current, then you will have to accept the fact that it may contain bugs. The sunny side is that you can report the bugs you find and might get a mention in the ChangeLog.txt (if you also find the fix...)

Slackware -current on the desktop? Only if you want to experiment. Slackware stable is for desktop and server, if you want a well-tested working environment.

Eric
 
Old 10-24-2005, 05:48 PM   #4
imitheos
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Quote:
Originally posted by Alien Bob
Slackware -current is the development effort towards the next stable release of SLackware.
This means that you can install slackware-current someday, only to find out that things do no longer work. If you want try running SLackware -current, then you will have to accept the fact that it may contain bugs. The sunny side is that you can report the bugs you find and might get a mention in the ChangeLog.txt (if you also find the fix...)

Slackware -current on the desktop? Only if you want to experiment. Slackware stable is for desktop and server, if you want a well-tested working environment.

Eric
As the other people said, Slackware -current is the development branch of Slackware. Every change goes to -current.

-Current gets frozen at some time and only bug fixes get in the tree and if it proves stable, the whole -current tree at that day
becomes the next slackware release.

I am "tracking" Slackware-current for a long time and didn't have any problem. If you are not very familiar with messing around
then i suggest staying with 10.2 but if you choose to upgrade to -current then you will not have any stability problems.

Slackware tends to be among the first distributions to include a new version of a program, but the whole process is always done
carefully. I can remember very few times that a upgraded package had problems (i believe automake was one some years ago)

I even use -current in my servers and my router and never had any problem, but thats just me. If 100 people answer, i guess
you will get 50-50 answers (Go with current/Stay with 10.2)

If you wish to follow current there are many upgrade tools for slackware.
I will briefly mention them: swaret,slapt-get,slack-get,slackpkg,others
 
Old 10-24-2005, 06:27 PM   #5
Hangdog42
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If you decide to go to current, one requirement is that you actually read the changelogs. Another really good idea is to avoid automated update tools like swaret or slackpkg UNLESS you have read the changelog. Just blindly updating with those tools is reallly asking for trouble since every now and again something goes into current that WILL bork your system unless you know in advance what to do.
 
Old 10-24-2005, 06:55 PM   #6
desertViking
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hangdog42
Another really good idea is to avoid automated update tools like swaret or slackpkg UNLESS you have read the changelog.
 
Old 10-24-2005, 06:59 PM   #7
desertViking
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Quote:
Originally posted by Hangdog42
Another really good idea is to avoid automated update tools like swaret or slackpkg UNLESS you have read the changelog.
Messed up the quote on my last attempt, sorry about that.

This seems like wise advice, and I've been reading the changelogs though haven't updated to current. Are you suggesting that one update manually instead of using something like slapt-get, or just that due dilligence tells you to read the changelog first, then update armed with all necessary information?

This thread has been very helpful to me. Thank-you for all taking the time to reply.

Kind regards.
 
Old 10-24-2005, 07:21 PM   #8
Hangdog42
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I think that something like slapt-get is OK if, and only if, you have read the changelogs AND you have dependency checking turned off (I guess I don't know if slapt-get does dependecy checks, I know swaret does). You pretty much hit the nail on the head about doing your due dilligence. If you know what changes are happening, and what you may have to do in order to be successful, you'll be fine. It is when you are trying to figure stuff out after everything has hit the fan that it gets frustrating.
 
  


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