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Old 09-10-2013, 11:42 AM   #16
tronayne
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Hmm.

Plenty of ammo for the Colt 45, plenty more for the Savage Model 14/114 American Classic, good knifes, Chicago Aermotor pumping water and running a automotive alternator, solar collector heating water, well, cave, full set of tools, Husvarna chain saw with 50 gallons of pre-mix and reasonable supply of chain oil and a couple of spare chains, full Carhartt wardrobe, 10 cases of Maker's Mark Gold (hey, don't really like beer all that much), some cases of MREs for backup, 10 cord of dry, split hardwood, cooking/heating stove for the hardwood, good solid bed, good solid chairs, good solid table, workbench, septic tank and drain field, snowshoes, crossbow and good supply of bolts, flour, salt, sugar, baking soda and powder, kitchen utensils.

That's be a start.
 
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Old 09-10-2013, 12:31 PM   #17
YellowApple
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Quote:
Originally Posted by philanc View Post
One area where girlfriend technology has been lagging far behind linux technology is all the SMP and multi-threading stuff.
It doesn't help that girlfriends run closed-source software on their cranial computers; makes things difficult to debug when there's an issue

Wives - in addition to the proprietary OS - also feature 24-karat DRM.
 
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Old 09-10-2013, 01:24 PM   #18
JWJones
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This might be helpful:

http://project-byzantium.org/

Who knows what the infrastructure is gonna look like!
 
Old 09-10-2013, 04:03 PM   #19
ReaperX7
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Okay right now as it stands we have a few good candidates for the software vault to ensure some level of technology can be kept safe for a future generation.

FreeDOS was chosen because honestly it's one of the lowest level OSes I could think of based on DOS which is freeware and open source and can be modularized heavily with add-on software which would be a good stopgap if and when DOS based software is found.

ReactOS was chosen because it's basically a Windows clone in open source. Because most of it's Win32 core is based in WINE and open source models of Win32, as software and files are recovered it would be necessary to have something for Win32 based systems to get up and running. The only problem is, ReactOS isn't very reliable yet to be of production level value, but it could be heavily developed to be more stable and eventually a supplemental and alternative OS outside of UNIX based ones.

We've fairly much have all three major *BSDs down so we know that there will be a clear choice. The same goes for GNU/Linux and OpenIndiana as both can offer something the others can't in the essence of server applications, workstations, and personal units. So realistically about all of UNIX's wide spread spectrum is covered, including Plan9.

The point was to create an archive that would allow a good variety of systems to be preserved in case a societal meltdown did occur and technology was lost for a time, but people kept or salvaged parts to rebuilt some technology and software would be required to make it all work again.

The vault's size really was an unimportant issue as multiple systems could be interred within to have a working computer with said system ready to go, as well as Media based CD/DVD/Blu-Ray to work from on systems being restored to working order.

The good point about the availability of a source code means that when the vault is recovered, and systems are rebuilt, restored, and advanced, advancements by educated maintainers can be made whereas closed source systems will be very much, non-recoverable and left behind. Software can advance again where it was left off, and life would go on.

As far as everything else in the prep work, yeah that's all good too but this was about preserving technology for the future and preventing the loss of what open source software has brought.
 
Old 09-10-2013, 04:09 PM   #20
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tronayne View Post
Hmm.

Plenty of ammo for the Colt 45, plenty more for the Savage Model 14/114 American Classic, good knifes, Chicago Aermotor pumping water and running a automotive alternator, solar collector heating water, well, cave, full set of tools, Husvarna chain saw with 50 gallons of pre-mix and reasonable supply of chain oil and a couple of spare chains, full Carhartt wardrobe, 10 cases of Maker's Mark Gold (hey, don't really like beer all that much), some cases of MREs for backup, 10 cord of dry, split hardwood, cooking/heating stove for the hardwood, good solid bed, good solid chairs, good solid table, workbench, septic tank and drain field, snowshoes, crossbow and good supply of bolts, flour, salt, sugar, baking soda and powder, kitchen utensils.

That's be a start.
Of Doomsday?
 
Old 09-10-2013, 07:07 PM   #21
EYo
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Wink I'd buy that for a ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by volkerdi View Post
I'll be running an rsync/ftp site on the pleasure saucers.
With loyal subscribers, no doubt. Yay future.
 
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Old 09-10-2013, 07:16 PM   #22
re_nelson
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ReaperX7 View Post
...but this was about preserving technology for the future and preventing the loss of what open source software has brought.
It's coincidental that you brought this up now. At the risk of drifting the topic a bit, I recently compiled
linapple, the Apple // emulator just for the sake of doing it. After getting intrigued by this long-forgotten system, I remembered that I had a real Apple //e tucked under mounds of stuff in my closet. It's been there gathering dust since 1990. Honestly, I had totally forgotten that I even had it since my nascent interest in Unix-like OSs led me to put it away...where it's been neglected, out-of-sight and out-of-mind for almost a quarter century.

After moving the flotsam and jetsam out of the way, I fired up the vintage computer (after finding the DOS 3.3 and AppleSoft sampler floppies). The two diskette drives whirred into life and the old Apple /// monitor was aglow, just a tad bit dimmer than I recall when it was last used. Adjacent to that long-hibernated machine was a caddy of 5.25-inch floppies, AppleWriter, QuickFile, ProDOS and, of course, the inevitable VisiCalc. And data floppies to accompany those apps were also tucked away since last used back in the 20th Century.

I discovered interesting spreadsheets, documents, memos and ancient BASIC programs I wrote back when I was still a (somewhat) youngish pup. What amazes me is that no bit rot set in. Sure, the sticky labels on the floppies had yellowed with time and some fell off when inserting the floppy into the drive. But, so far, it's all good. In it's own way, it was like discovering buried treasure.

So much for the personal memories...and to steer this back into something resembling the topic, I plan to recover as much data as I can using the serial card and the Apple Access package, which does indeed work (and I've successfully saved a few files already).

Anyway, ReaperX7, I didn't intend to send this down a cul de sac but your doomsday scenario reminded me of what happened in my little world just over the past day.

(And by the way, in case Lufbery stops by this thread, Chaz Noll was the Stiller coach when I last fired up the old Apple. That really shows how long it's been).

Last edited by re_nelson; 09-10-2013 at 07:21 PM.
 
Old 09-10-2013, 11:57 PM   #23
John VV
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A operating system is a LONG way down on a list

but

you will want to think of hardware dependability - it HAS TO LAST !!!!!!!!
an example:
the current mars rover "Curiosity "
https://picasaweb.google.com/lh/phot...eat=directlink
that computer NEEDS to be very reliable
A 200MHz RAD750 CPU ( a cpu designed in 2001 ),256 meg of ram , 2 gig flash
http://spaceflightnow.com/mars/msl/120810computer/

then something to power it
you will not be able to plug it into an outlet on the wall

so solar it is
 
Old 09-11-2013, 01:01 AM   #24
chytraeus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
I had a similar thought, with different priorities though:
  1. Girlfriend
  2. Cave
  3. Bear skin
  4. Beer
  5. Set of tools for girlfriend
  6. Something that enables girlfriend to make fire

Oh man, that is laugh out loud funny.
 
Old 09-11-2013, 02:33 AM   #25
gargamel
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
I had a similar thought, with different priorities though:
  1. Girlfriend
  2. Cave
  3. Bear skin
  4. Beer
  5. Set of tools for girlfriend
  6. Something that enables girlfriend to make fire

LOL!!!

gargamel
 
Old 09-11-2013, 05:14 AM   #26
brianL
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3: "Cooking Humans for Dummies" - H.Lecter
 
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Old 09-11-2013, 06:19 AM   #27
kooru
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NetBSD, because..You don't know it yet but an amazing girl is writing to u.
 
Old 09-11-2013, 07:16 AM   #28
tronayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
Of Doomsday?
Well, I do live half-way to the north pole in the woods (lots of critters to eat, gets darned cold and snowy in the winter, ya know.

Probably forget about the servers and keep a laptop or two (easy to charge the things). Keep the satellite dish too -- unlikely that they'll fall out of the sky and maybe, just maybe, HughesNet will stay up. I do like the girlfriend idea, though -- wife might complain but what the heck. On the other hand, wife is competent fire builder and she cooks better than I do (and knows how to butcher a deer which I'm just no darned good at).

Speaking of deer, a couple of barrels of wine might come in handy for marinading.

Sure might miss the Dodge Ram, though but we do have a Jeep...
 
Old 09-11-2013, 09:01 AM   #29
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tronayne View Post
Well, I do live half-way to the north pole in the woods (lots of critters to eat, gets darned cold and snowy in the winter, ya know.
And I thought I lived in a remote place (http://www.microlinux.fr --> house right next to the church tower). My little village seems like Marseilles compared to your wilderness.
 
Old 09-12-2013, 08:35 AM   #30
tronayne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
And I thought I lived in a remote place (http://www.microlinux.fr --> house right next to the church tower). My little village seems like Marseilles compared to your wilderness.
Well, it's not that remote -- nearest neighbor is 500 yards north, nearest towns are 15 miles in either direction, nearest gasoline is, um, 6 miles. Not nearly as cold or snowy as it is where Pat lives, down the driveway is a US highway (that gets plowed likety-split when it snows). Got electricity, got a phone line, got a good well, got a septic tank, got a 500 gallon propane tank, life is good.

A cougar/mountain lion lives up the road and back in the woods a ways, see it every so often, it keeps the deer population down. Have eagles flying around -- the DNR (department of natural resources) was checking a couple of eagle nests and found collars, that explained a few vanished small dogs and cats (a large Labrador lives at our house, no problem with the eagles there). The coyotes howl every so often, the dog hears the call of wild, I explain about sleeping in the rain and snow and hunting your food and all that to him, end of interest in running with the coyotes.

Went to the Upper Peninsula last weekend. There you can drive for 50 or more miles without seeing any sign of human occupation, just beautiful country, forest, lakes, occasional critters (saw a moose wandering around in a clearing). There's more moose, deer, wolves and bears in the UP than there are people. Kinda nice, that. You just have to make sure you've got enough gas to get where you're going.

Around here it's not like Europe or much of the eastern seaboard of the US, you don't stumble over people every few feet, you have to go a ways to visit the neighbors (we figure our immediate neighborhood is about 12 square miles). Funny thing is, I know a whole lot more people here that I ever did living in a major metropolitan area and I know them better, too. I also know that if I need help with something, folks show up to lend a hand (and vice-versa, of course). We have a fair number of Amish families farming -- they get by with horses and buggies, no electricity, no automobiles, no tractors and they grow some amazing crops.

It's an interesting place to live.

Forgot to include http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=...9QEwAw&dur=430

Last edited by tronayne; 09-12-2013 at 09:14 AM.
 
  


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