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-   -   Slackware 14 RC5 install image has a typo in boot up message (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-14-rc5-install-image-has-a-typo-in-boot-up-message-4175428448/)

qunying 09-21-2012 05:02 PM

Slackware 14 RC5 install image has a typo in boot up message
 
The install image has a small typo when first bootup. This is from the usbboot.img, I did not try the other.

It says:
Quote:

In a pinch, you can boot your system from here with a command like:
boot: huge.s root=/dev/sda1 rdinit= ro
Where rdinit should be initrd to avoid loading the initrd image.

trademark91 09-21-2012 06:05 PM

I thought it always said rdinit?

allend 09-21-2012 08:26 PM

That is not a typo. From /usr/src/linux/Documentation/kernel-parameters.txt
Code:

        rdinit=                [KNL]
                        Format: <full_path>
                        Run specified binary instead of /init from the ramdisk,
                        used for early userspace startup. See initrd.


dc_eros 09-21-2012 08:31 PM

It's rdinit. I always used that when fixing broken Slackware installations.

foobarz 09-22-2012 02:24 AM

Yes, kind of interesting... for example, if you are using an initrd.gz in lilo.conf:

boot: vmlinuz rdinit=/bin/sh

This runs /bin/sh inside the initrd instead of the usual /init script. This gets you a sh shell and nothing that /init normally does happens at all. Then, you can fix something maybe, and manually run /init (exec it so it is pid 1):

exec /init

Then, the system starts normally.

But, "rdinit=" tells the kernel to ignore the initrd and skip along with regular "legacy" boot of the root= device.

qunying 09-22-2012 11:46 AM

That is something interesting to know. As in my case, I don't need the extra support from initrd, so I used initrd= to skip the loading of it.


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