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-   -   Slackware 14 generic SMP kernel doesn't boot in Virtualbox (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-14-generic-smp-kernel-doesnt-boot-in-virtualbox-4175431849/)

chemicalfan 10-12-2012 09:13 AM

Slackware 14 generic SMP kernel doesn't boot in Virtualbox
 
Total Slack noob here, so bear with me :)

Ok, so I'm trying to install Slackware 14 (32 bit) into Virtualbox (Windows 7 x64 host, latest VB version), been through the setup, stripped out a load of stuff related to X as I want this to be console only. The plan is to use this as a bridge between my dual boot Linux, as I store media on my /home ext4 partition, and was going to use this Slack VB to run a Samba share of my /home partition to allow Windows to access those files. Yes, I know there are other ways to do that, but I want to do it this way :)

Anyway, just finished the setup, rebooted, and I get a kernel panic saying it can't mount root FS (it's formatted to ext4, a single partition for the whole install). I've got a screenshot showing the actual message, but I can't post it up here (and can't use pastebin from work).
This is my first foray into Slack, and I've no idea which way to go at the moment. The kernel is the generic SMP one that comes with the install disc (didn't bother installing the huge one, as I thought I'd probably end up re-compiliing this one anyway) I've never really had to deal with kernel panics before :(

Is this a known bug with this kernel? What do I do now?

guanx 10-12-2012 09:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chemicalfan (Post 4803865)
... (didn't bother installing the huge one, ...

See what happens if you do bother installing the huge one.

chemicalfan 10-12-2012 09:24 AM

Yep, that's the next plan regarding my installation, but if I'm not the only one with the problem (i.e. it's recreatable by others), it should be noted that the generic kernel doesn't work with Virtualbox. Of course, this could be a setup/config issue, but I don't really have the knowledge to determine that (hence my post! :))

TobiSGD 10-12-2012 09:26 AM

Did you create the initrd? If so, did you specify the ext4 module to be used in the initrd?

chemicalfan 10-12-2012 09:32 AM

Doh, I'd assumed that would have been part of the installation of the boot loader or kernel package? From your comment, I'm guessing it may not.....

Is ext4 a module in that kernel then?

TobiSGD 10-12-2012 10:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chemicalfan (Post 4803885)
Doh, I'd assumed that would have been part of the installation of the boot loader or kernel package? From your comment, I'm guessing it may not.....

No, as stated in the installation documentation, in fact it is not. You have to make that yourself. Have a look at the documentation in the SlackDocs: http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:...generic_kernel

chemicalfan 10-12-2012 10:32 AM

Damn it, I read the installation guide but not the beginners guide! Sorry to waste your time, seems like I wasted my own time too by making assumptions and not RTFM :(

s3phir0th115 10-12-2012 11:27 PM

On the root of the install media there should be a README.initrd, I suggest you read that some as the generic kernel requires an initrd. With that I didn't have to consult any external documentation. It includes full directions and examples.

What I personally do is install the huge kernel, from install, then add a generic kernel configuration to lilo, taking care not to remove the original one until I'm sure the generic one boots properly. (Of course, make sure you run lilo again once the change is made.)

Slackovado 10-13-2012 03:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chemicalfan (Post 4803876)
Yep, that's the next plan regarding my installation, but if I'm not the only one with the problem (i.e. it's recreatable by others), it should be noted that the generic kernel doesn't work with Virtualbox. Of course, this could be a setup/config issue, but I don't really have the knowledge to determine that (hence my post! :))

Yeah, it's "broken by design".
Including the couple modules for the ~4 most used file systems so that 99% of desktop systems can boot without initrd would be too drastic and radical.
So basically no new Slackware user ever manages to install successfully without spending couple days troubleshooting.

T3slider 10-13-2012 06:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Slackovado (Post 4804899)
Yeah, it's "broken by design".
Including the couple modules for the ~4 most used file systems so that 99% of desktop systems can boot without initrd would be too drastic and radical.
So basically no new Slackware user ever manages to install successfully without spending couple days troubleshooting.

If you include the filesystems modules, then you must also include the hard drive controller modules and maybe the USB modules...where does it end? If you include everything needed by any hardware, aren't you just using the huge kernel anyway?

Slackovado 10-14-2012 05:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by T3slider (Post 4805029)
If you include the filesystems modules, then you must also include the hard drive controller modules and maybe the USB modules...where does it end? If you include everything needed by any hardware, aren't you just using the huge kernel anyway?

I said 99%.
Yes, the common controllers' modules should be included and probably are anyway. Vast majority of desktop computers use Intel controllers and USB chips. The rest %1 can do initrd.

TobiSGD 10-14-2012 05:40 AM

Contrary to common belief the huge kernel does not have everything and the kitchen sink compiled in. Try something like
Code:

vimdiff /boot/config-generic-smp-3.2.29-smp /boot/config-huge-smp-3.2.29-smp
and you will see that the main differences are that the huge kernel has support for the most harddisk controllers and filesystems compiled into the kernel. The only other difference worth noticing is support for Speakup, so that visually impaired people have the chance to install and run Slackware.

So the kernel you demand, with modules for harddisk controllers and filesystems compiled into the kernel, already exists and is in fact used as default kernel, you just are not aware of it. ;)

chemicalfan 10-15-2012 03:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by T3slider (Post 4805029)
If you include the filesystems modules, then you must also include the hard drive controller modules and maybe the USB modules...where does it end? If you include everything needed by any hardware, aren't you just using the huge kernel anyway?

Not exactly, there's a TON of stuff in the kernel you won't need (for example, I only need ext4, not the others)

Quote:

Originally Posted by Slackovado (Post 4804899)
Yeah, it's "broken by design".
Including the couple modules for the ~4 most used file systems so that 99% of desktop systems can boot without initrd would be too drastic and radical.
So basically no new Slackware user ever manages to install successfully without spending couple days troubleshooting.

That's a bit elitist, isn't it? :p

Just an update - got it all working eventually, by booting with the install CD and pointing the boot parameter at the installed root, then using slackpkg to install the other kernel. Quick lilo update and I'm good to go!
Thanks all for posting


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