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Old 10-15-2012, 08:06 PM   #16
dr.s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
The OS name is a dead giveaway, unstable by definition
 
Old 10-15-2012, 08:09 PM   #17
dr.s
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samac View Post
Not sure what they were doing to take so long to install. In an hour I had installed it, configured it, broke it...
Must be their hardware. On a couple machines here, it took 15 and 20 minutes to install Slackware.
 
Old 10-18-2012, 09:28 AM   #18
elesmod
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NyteOwl View Post
(...) I came to the conclusion some time ago that Distrowatch doesn't like Slackware.
I liked their 13.37 review; especially the last paragraph:
Quote:
It has been often said that if a person wants to learn about Red Hat they should install Red Hat, but if one wants to learn Linux they should install Slackware. I think there's some truth to that, partly because Slackware largely avoids distro-specific tools and configurations, but also because it forces the users to educate themselves. One certainly can learn the nuts and bolts of Linux through Ubuntu, Fedora or openSUSE, but where those distributions provide a lot of hand holding, Slackware patiently sits to the side with its arms folded. As a teaching aid Slackware is hard to beat as it's stable, has a clean implementation and encourages user involvement while offering sane defaults. Slackware will also be appealing to people who want their computer to do what they tell it to, no more, no less. I wouldn't recommend it to users who aren't interested in what's going on "under the hood"; it's a distro for expert users or for people who wish to become expert users. Whether you like Slackware will depend a lot on what you're looking for in an operating system, but I'm happy to report 13.37 continues the project's tradition of stable, clean computing.
 
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Old 10-18-2012, 05:03 PM   #19
mattallmill
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Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
Slackware may be a dinosaur, but the main advantage of dinosaurs is it takes at least a meteor strike to take them out.
I totally agree.
 
Old 10-18-2012, 05:13 PM   #20
mrascii
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Quoted from the article:

Quote:
When running the distribution in VirtualBox I ran into a few problems. Slackware in the virtual machine wouldn't allow me to set a high screen resolution and performance was quite slow.
You need to install Guest Additions for higher resolution. If the CPU on the host doesn't support hardware virtualization or if it isn't turned on in the BIOS the performance of guest VMs will be s-l-o-w.

DNA
AKA mrascii
 
Old 10-19-2012, 02:29 AM   #21
wigry
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Couple of things were indeed strange in the article but the most striking was first the installation time (they should replace or at least clean the DVD reader so that it would get more that 3 files off the disc per minute) and second the virtualbox performance. I suspect that the second issue is directly related to memory given to the image. I run Slack extremely well in virtualbox myself but I must allocate at least 1.5 gigs of RAM to it or it will start swapping when I run all the servers and stuf I use it for. It is well known that any Unix will become almost unusable once it starts to swap. So be sure that all your stuff fits into the memory and your performance is excellent.

And still people find it unbelievable that dependency checking is missing. I for one like to have all the missing library errors until I personally have installed all the necessary stuff to my box so that at least I know what version of what library is in there. This knowledge is absolutely critical if you want to be in control of your box.

BTW recently I gave up the Git GUI tools and started to use it from command line exclusively because those GUI tools are not reliable, I don't know which commands they issue and I've managed to almost mess up couple of my git repos with Eclipse Egit plugin. Never again! Command line FTW. Git is too complicated tool to trust some GUI tools into it. You really noeed to know what commands to issue and in which order to get things done. Yes it requires a bit learning but as said elswhere - every learning curve is rewarded with understanding.
 
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Old 10-19-2012, 03:17 AM   #22
bobzilla
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Quote:
Personally I find it strange people are still opposed to something so useful (and, on modern distributions, reliable) as dependency checking,
Yeah right...

Quote:
especially since it can be turned off in distributions which support the feature.
What?

Quote:
However I'm not here to talk about other distros and how they do things, but rather Slackware and how it works.
But he just did.

Other than that, 3 hours? I have multiple Slackware installs in VBox and I don't remember any taking more than half of hour. Probably even less. But it could make sense for mobile processor not to support Virtualization. Sad news for Apple and MS, but desktop is not yet dead.
 
Old 10-19-2012, 03:34 AM   #23
bobzilla
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Btw, nice comment kikinovak. I like the dinosaur bit.
 
Old 10-19-2012, 05:02 AM   #24
GazL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzilla View Post
What?
They're referring to stuff like using "rpm --nodeps" I guess, or apt 'pinning' and other equivalent mechanisms
 
Old 10-19-2012, 05:39 AM   #25
brianL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzilla View Post
Btw, nice comment kikinovak. I like the dinosaur bit.
Agreed. And another quote from Niki's comment:
Quote:
Last but not least: Slackware's dependency resolver is `whoami`


That whoami command is very useful. You wake up after a session of overindulgence in alcohol and/or strange chemicals, look in a mirror, think ?!?!?!?!?. Get on your compuer, run whoami - mystery solved!

Last edited by brianL; 10-19-2012 at 05:40 AM.
 
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Old 10-19-2012, 07:27 AM   #26
bobzilla
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL View Post
They're referring to stuff like using "rpm --nodeps" I guess, or apt 'pinning' and other equivalent mechanisms
I was guessing they meant that. Well, I guess you already know the difference. First, there is no option to disable automatic dependency tracking system wide. That's per package setting. Second, they would have a "fun" time disabling it, even if there was. Simply because system is not designed for manual dependency tracking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by brianL View Post
Agreed. And another quote from Niki's comment:

Further down bellow he compared sbopkg to Ubuntu Software Center.

Quote:
but if you're only using it on one or two machines, sbopkg is defnitely the way to go.

Almost as comfortable as the Ubuntu Software Center
Funny guy.
 
Old 10-19-2012, 07:33 AM   #27
WoefulNarvik
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
This is an issue with the authors hardware. Any distro takes much longer than usual to install on his system, which is pointed out also in the comments. He must have a really slow DVD reader or harddisk.
I agree and the comment on VirtualBox resolution indicates he didn't install the additions. Slackware 14 does run peachy on VMware
 
Old 10-19-2012, 07:47 AM   #28
ozar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
Distrowatch weekly issue #478 sports a detailed review of Slackware 14.0.

http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?is...121015#feature
Thanks for the alert... on my way over there to check it out.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bobzilla View Post
Sad news for Apple and MS, but desktop is not yet dead.
Agreed... none of the portable computer solutions that I've tried even come close to giving me the enjoyment and satisfaction derived from using a full desktop. Hopefully, desktops will always be an option for computer users.
 
Old 10-19-2012, 08:16 AM   #29
onebuck
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Hi,

From: http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?is...121015#feature
Quote:
I opted to install just about everything, minus the kernel source code, the Xfce desktop, games and the aforementioned Emacs. I then waited while the installer copied over the selected items. My selections totaled 6.2GB of data (once packages were uncompressed) and took a little over an hour to install.
Quote:
I ran the latest release of Slackware on my laptop (dual-core 2GHz CPU, 4GB of RAM, Intel wireless and Intel video cards) and in a VirtualBox virtual machine. On the laptop Slackware worked well.
The above excepts do seem to indicate that 'Jesse Smith' was doing two different installs on separate hardware. Even one hour for a install seems to indicate that either hard disk or DVD reader could be the issue. Not comparing apple to oranges but most installs for me are 15 to 35 minutes. Which does depend on hardware, some use 'SSD' with a good reader, 4-8GB memory footprint usually AMD except for my new Dell XPS i7 which took about 12 minutes to install for a 'SSD' & mounted ISO to loop.

Even for Jesse's Laptop to a VM seems excessive install time for that class of machine.
From: http://distrowatch.com/weekly.php?is...121015#feature
Quote:
Something I found interesting about the 32-bit build of Slackware was that the packages installed from the DVD were compiled for the i486 architecture, which is getting a bit dated. On the other hand, the default Slackware kernel used to install the operating system requires the computer's processor be PAE-enabled, a feature old i486 machines didn't support. It struck me as an odd combination to use as the default configuration.
Here is where the reviewer is lacking in knowledge let alone understanding. If Jesse wanted or needs optimization then he should say so. Not knowing the multiple platforms Slackware will install too is one thing that should be noted within the reviewers context. Lack for understanding of code base or LSB is another region that Jesse most certainly lacks or chose to ignore out right.

The old saying 'Beauty is in the eye of the beholder' holds true for this Slackware review by Jesse Smith;
Quote:
Literal meaning - the perception of beauty is subjective.
Enough Said!
 
Old 10-19-2012, 01:24 PM   #30
Beelzebud
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Not having dependency checking sounds scary when you come from distros like Ubuntu and Arch, but the secret is that once you have your OS set up, you really don't need dependency checking. I set up my Slack14 install the day it came out, had all my 3rd party installed and configured by the next day. I haven't thought about any of that stuff since then.

Not only that, but one way you can fool yourself with a distro like Arch is to say "Well I'm the admin and only things that I install are on my machine". That sounds great until you're running without gnome, and want to install a program from the repo that requires the entire gnome install as a dependency. On Slackware I really do know goes on my machine, because the dependency checker is me.

Not that I'm completely trying to discount the idea of having dependency checking. It does help out greatly when you're a new user and/or don't care about all the fine details of what is actually on your machine.
 
  


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