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-   -   Slackware 14.0 and NTFS. (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-14-0-and-ntfs-4175441957/)

stf92 12-18-2012 07:29 AM

Slackware 14.0 and NTFS.
 
Hi:
I want to have an NTFS partition, besides the ext2/ext3 partition. Is there any need to have Windows? Before having 14.0 I periodically booted in Windows to run CHKDSK.EXE on the NTFS partition (I had an extra NTFS partition to store some files).

Bazzaah 12-18-2012 07:51 AM

You don't have to have Windows to use NTFS.

I used to keep a partition as NTFS but I just moved the data I kept there and reformatted to ext4 and put the data back.

If you reinstall Windows at some point, there are (or at least were) utilities available that can read your Linux partitions from Windows.

stf92 12-18-2012 08:11 AM

But what is the problem in having an NTFS partition?

Bazzaah 12-18-2012 08:16 AM

There isn't one - if you want to have an NTFS partition, you can have one.

stf92 12-18-2012 09:01 AM

But how do I check the filesystem? I do not find a program similar to fsck for NTFS.

guanx 12-18-2012 10:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4851879)
But how do I check the filesystem? I do not find a program similar to fsck for NTFS.

You don't find it because it's not there. Run Windows in a virtual machine and use chkdsk.

Bazzaah 12-18-2012 10:13 AM

I'm not sure that you'll be able to find a direct substitute for chkdsk. I bet it's possible to do some basic checks from Linux.

If you are very worried about the integrity of your NTFS partition you could always back up your data and convert your partition to a native Linux format.

stf92 12-18-2012 10:40 AM

Up to now I have had slackware 12.0 and had to install Tuxera's ntfs-3g to be able to manage the NTFS filesystem. Is there any difference between 12.0 and 14.0 in what regards NTFS?

Alien Bob 12-18-2012 12:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4851973)
Up to now I have had slackware 12.0 and had to install Tuxera's ntfs-3g to be able to manage the NTFS filesystem. Is there any difference between 12.0 and 14.0 in what regards NTFS?

Slackware 14 supports this out of the box.

Eric

stf92 12-18-2012 01:05 PM

Thanks. However, I did
Code:

semoi@darkstar:~$ apropos ntfs
libntfs []          (8)  - gnomevfs - Module for GNOME VFS that allows access to NTFS filesystems
libntfs []          (8)  - library for accessing and managing NTFS volumes
mkntfs []            (8)  - create an NTFS file system
ntfs []              (8)  - 3g - Third Generation Read/Write NTFS Driver
ntfs []              (8)  - 3g.probe - Probe an NTFS volume mountability
ntfscat []          (8)  - print NTFS files and streams on the standard output
ntfsclone []        (8)  - Efficiently clone, image, restore or rescue an NTFS
ntfscluster []      (8)  - identify files in a specified region of an NTFS volume
ntfscmp []          (8)  - compare two NTFS filesystems and tell the differences
ntfscp []            (8)  - copy file to an NTFS volume
ntfsfix []          (8)  - fix common errors and force Windows to check NTFS
ntfsinfo []          (8)  - dump a file's attributes
ntfslabel []        (8)  - display/change the label on an ntfs file system
ntfsls []            (8)  - list directory contents on an NTFS filesystem
ntfsmount []        (8)  - Read/Write userspace NTFS driver
ntfsprogs []        (8)  - tools for doing neat things with NTFS
ntfsresize []        (8)  - resize an NTFS filesystem without data loss
ntfsundelete []      (8)  - recover a deleted file from an NTFS volume
smbcquotas []        (1)  - Set or get QUOTAs of NTFS 5 shares
semoi@darkstar:~$

under 14.0 and do not find something to check/fix an NTFS file system.

rouvas 12-18-2012 05:30 PM

How about "ntfsfix"?

guanx 12-18-2012 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4852110)
Thanks. However, I did
Code:

semoi@darkstar:~$ apropos ntfs
libntfs []          (8)  - gnomevfs - Module for GNOME VFS that allows access to NTFS filesystems
libntfs []          (8)  - library for accessing and managing NTFS volumes
mkntfs []            (8)  - create an NTFS file system
ntfs []              (8)  - 3g - Third Generation Read/Write NTFS Driver
ntfs []              (8)  - 3g.probe - Probe an NTFS volume mountability
ntfscat []          (8)  - print NTFS files and streams on the standard output
ntfsclone []        (8)  - Efficiently clone, image, restore or rescue an NTFS
ntfscluster []      (8)  - identify files in a specified region of an NTFS volume
ntfscmp []          (8)  - compare two NTFS filesystems and tell the differences
ntfscp []            (8)  - copy file to an NTFS volume
ntfsfix []          (8)  - fix common errors and force Windows to check NTFS
ntfsinfo []          (8)  - dump a file's attributes
ntfslabel []        (8)  - display/change the label on an ntfs file system
ntfsls []            (8)  - list directory contents on an NTFS filesystem
ntfsmount []        (8)  - Read/Write userspace NTFS driver
ntfsprogs []        (8)  - tools for doing neat things with NTFS
ntfsresize []        (8)  - resize an NTFS filesystem without data loss
ntfsundelete []      (8)  - recover a deleted file from an NTFS volume
smbcquotas []        (1)  - Set or get QUOTAs of NTFS 5 shares
semoi@darkstar:~$

under 14.0 and do not find something to check/fix an NTFS file system.

As I have said, you don't find it because it is not there.

beder 12-18-2012 06:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rouvas (Post 4852272)
How about "ntfsfix"?

As said already, there is no Linux tool that's like chkdsk


Code:

NAME
      ntfsfix - fix common errors and force Windows to check NTFS

SYNOPSIS
      ntfsfix [options] device

DESCRIPTION
      ntfsfix  is  a utility that fixes some common NTFS problems.  ntfsfix is NOT a Linux version of chkdsk.  It only repairs some fundamental
      NTFS inconsistencies, resets the NTFS journal file and schedules an NTFS consistency check for the first boot into Windows.

      You may run ntfsfix on an NTFS volume if you think it was damaged by Windows or some other way and it cannot be mounted.


TobiSGD 12-18-2012 07:39 PM

I am quite puzzled why you want to use a NTFS file-system although you don't plan to use Windows. Care to explain what advantages you expect from using NTFS?

allend 12-18-2012 08:24 PM

NTFS is a proprietary file system developed by Microsoft for the Windows operating system. There are no available standard specifications. (All Linux support for NTFS is based on reverse engineering.) This means that it is impossible to write a definitive NTFS file system checker for Linux. You _must_ use the Microsoft CHKDSK program to perform this function.


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