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-   -   Slackware 10.3(11?) and Slapt-Get (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-10-3-11-and-slapt-get-435394/)

SlackerDex 04-15-2006 09:50 AM

Slackware 10.3(11?) and Slapt-Get
 
I was just wondering if it would be safe (in the future that is) to point my (g)Slapt-Get to the 10.3(11?) packages rather than the 10.2 packages to do a full upgrade of my system?

AxeZ 04-15-2006 10:38 AM

That's called slackware-current and people are doing it all the time.
I haven't had any significant problem since I switched to current.

SlackerDex 04-15-2006 10:43 AM

No, I'm not referring to slack-current. I'm referring to slack.10.3(11?) when it comes out. Instead of having (g)Slapt-Get pointing to slack.10.2 would it be safe to point it to slack.10.3(11?) to upgrade(not patch) my system?

AxeZ 04-15-2006 10:46 AM

slackware-current will eventualy become slackware 11 at on point. So take your pick...either go right now with current or later with slack 11 when it comes out..it's same thing

SlackerDex 04-15-2006 01:21 PM

Just a quick question, to upgrade to current I just (in theory) follow the ChangeLog right (downloading from the bottom to the top?
eg.from +--------------------------+
Tue Sep 13 12:24:53 PDT 2005
Slackware 10.2 is released.
Thanks to everyone to helped make it possible.
Enjoy! :-)
)?


Do I follow this ChangeLog if I want to update to current ; http://slackware.it/en/changelog/view.php?q=current?

drumz 04-15-2006 01:37 PM

Yes, just follow the changelog and you'll be fine. It should be mentioned that current is officially unstable, but I've been running current for quite a long time and never had any problems. If you want to be extra sure on your system's stability, then you can just wait till Slackware 11 comes out. I haven't used Slapt-Get, but usually when upgrading from one version to another, UPGRADE.TXT tells you to drop into runlevel 1 before updating packages. I'm not sure how Slapt-Get handles that.

Edit: When upgrading X or KDE you better drop to runlevel 3. (Seems obvious but I don't think the changelog always mentions that.)

MQMan 04-15-2006 04:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlackerDex
No, I'm not referring to slack-current. I'm referring to slack.10.3(11?) when it comes out. Instead of having (g)Slapt-Get pointing to slack.10.2 would it be safe to point it to slack.10.3(11?) to upgrade(not patch) my system?

When a new version is released, Pat always includes an "upgrade.txt" file. Read that before you upgrade. You may have to do some packages in a certain order, which using Slapt-Get might not do correctly.

Cheers,
Eddie

Xian 04-15-2006 10:22 PM

This is a great tutorial: How-To Upgrade Slackware Versions

geskorup 04-15-2006 11:01 PM

I use the SlackPkg tool to keep my systems with -current. Very easy to use.

# telinit 3

switch to runlevel 3

# slackpkg update

get the latest PACKAGES.TXT, etc..

# slackpkg upgrade x11

and I'm running X from -current.

# slackpkg search all | grep upgrade

tells you all of the packages that need to be upgraded.

-G

Seppel 04-16-2006 06:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlackerDex
Just a quick question, to upgrade to current I just (in theory) follow the ChangeLog right (downloading from the bottom to the top?
eg.from +--------------------------+
Tue Sep 13 12:24:53 PDT 2005
Slackware 10.2 is released.
Thanks to everyone to helped make it possible.
Enjoy! :-)
)?


Do I follow this ChangeLog if I want to update to current ; http://slackware.it/en/changelog/view.php?q=current?

There's a much easier way to fully upgrade your System and keep it Current: Install slackpkg (for example from ftp://ftp.heanet.ie/pub/slackware/pu...2-noarch-2.tgz (Reload if "Server busy" is responded)),
install the package with installpkg,
go to /etc/slackpkg and
edit "mirrors" and uncomment your slackware-current mirror of choice, then
execute "slackpkg update"
and "slackpkg upgrade-all".
Not sit down and wait. :-)

WARNING: Note that this will upgrade ALL System packages found in -current that differ from the 10.2 ones, so, if you've compiled something custom, it will be overwritten; you can blacklist packages (man slackpkg). There's no warranty for this guide here , I'm not sure if there is any other initial procedure needed for slackpkg.

Greetings,

Seppel

SlackerDex 04-17-2006 11:30 AM

Seppel last time I tried something similar to this(swaret) and ended up breaking my system. Is it safe to do a slackpkg upgrade-all?

geskorup 04-17-2006 02:14 PM

I have not done an upgrade-all with slackpkg. There are certain packages that cannot be upgraded while the system is fully running. You can't upgrade bash if it's running. Packages such as aaa_base, aaa_elflibs and util-linux can be broken if you dont know what you're doing. Probably the most difficult package is aaa_elflibs. The system cannot be running when upgrading critical system libraries. Ok, well, not that it can't be running, but you should definitely be in run level 1.

What I do to upgrade things that can easily break the system is this..

# slackpkg download $package

then reboot with a neat little rescue system called RIP Linux. It's based on Slackware which is PERFECT! And just a ~20MB ISO that can be burned to a mini CD-R. Mount your root partition to /mnt/hd. Run upgradepkg -root (I think that's it) /mnt/hd/var/cache/packages/$package. upgradepkg/installpkg has the ability to change the root file system for this reason. So you're basically running from the rescue system and can upgrade the system on your HD. I find this to be the safer way to upgrade critical system components such as bash and aaa's.

-G

geskorup 04-17-2006 02:32 PM

Forgot to add, the /etc/slackpkg/blacklist file can be used to stop packages from being upgraded during an upgrade-all. I believe aaa_elflibs is in that file by default. I also blacklist kernel and alsa. I have a custom kernel and alsa build, so I do not want to upgrade those.

-G

drumz 04-17-2006 09:18 PM

I've never had a problem upgrading from runlevel 1. The basic rules I follow are as follows:
If I know what it is, and it's a simple program (like Firefox), I just close all instances of the program and upgrade.
If it's X and/or KDE, I drop to the CLI (since I boot to runlevel 3 it's really easy).
If I'm not sure what it is, or I know it's important, I go to runlevel 1.
So far it's worked for me.

Edit: I know runlevel is "safe" because in all of the UPGRADE.TXT files that are included, the directions are to go to runlevel 1. Nothing fancy like booting off of a CD (although that is a perfectly fine way of doing things).

Seppel 04-18-2006 01:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlackerDex
Seppel last time I tried something similar to this(swaret) and ended up breaking my system. Is it safe to do a slackpkg upgrade-all?

Read the other opinions. I upgraded this way from 10.1 to 10.2 without any problems except the need to recompile the nVidia driver. If it's no critical machine, give it a try :-) - and backup your files! This should be done every time you upgrade.

Greetings,

Seppel


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