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-   -   Slackware 10.2 or ubuntu? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/slackware-10-2-or-ubuntu-434551/)

roAder 04-12-2006 02:40 PM

Slackware 10.2 or ubuntu?
 
Okey, I've been a traitor for sometime now... I Think I have been using Windows XP for about 1 years or 2 since the last time I used my beloved Slackware OS...

But now I've had it once again with Windows, so right now I'm using Slackware 10.1 and just got my modem up and running, but when I started to look around for the new Distro (10.2 I think) I also happend to read a thread here on LQ where there was a poll of the best distros... I ofcourse thought that Slack was no1 this year to (like all other years) but then I saw Ubuntu on the top...

hmm maybe I should try it out before downloading the new Slack distro, someone here who have tried Ubuntu?

Jeebizz 04-12-2006 02:45 PM

I say go for it, and try Ubuntu. I myself have never really ventured out to another Linux distro, since Slackware 9.0, when I tried Mandrake 9.2, but then came back to Slackware, and the only non-linux OS that I have attempted was FreeBSD6.0. From what I hear Ubuntu is Debian based, but I can't say anything else about Ubuntu, having never tried it myself. If it suites your needs, cool, if not come back to Slackware, but by all means keep experimenting with other distros too.

brianthegreat 04-12-2006 02:50 PM

I was a long time redhat/fedora user and switched to ubuntu. Ubuntu is the best distro that I have ever used thus far.

uselpa 04-12-2006 02:54 PM

Both are very different distros.

Ubuntu is more easy to use, software is more readily available, it's for people who want to *use* Linux. Slackware is more for "hackers" who want to understand as much of the OS as possible. So it really depends on you.

Both Slackware (rumours) and Ubuntu (official) are about to release new versions, so you might want to wait a little before downloading.

roAder 04-12-2006 02:57 PM

I've done some reading and I think I'll try Ubuntu but I also think that I will fall back onto Slackware, cause it's no doubt about the best distro for me, so far...

brianthegreat 04-12-2006 03:01 PM

You really canot go wrong with either distro. It just depends regarding what you like. That is what I love about linux because there is a lot of choice.

MS3FGX 04-12-2006 03:09 PM

I have used Ubuntu for a bit, and have it on my girlfriends computer. I really hate it.

I understand it is not geared towards users like myself, but it infuriates me every time I have to work on her computer, since I can't just easily and quickly fix problems like I could in Slackware. Nearly everything has to be done though some silly GUI they have setup, Even standard configuration programs like alsaconfig are not included, it is instead replaced by some sound card configuration GUI that lacks any sort of options or useful debug information.

It's hardware autodetection was also lacking the last time I installed on a friend's computer. Not only did the sound not work at all, the video output was terrible. After wrestling with the system for awhile, I realized I was going to need to recompile the kernel, another thing Ubuntu was clearly not setup to do easily. When I realized that, I just formatted and installed XP. XP was actually less problematic than Ubuntu, which is something I have never thought I would say about a Linux distro.

BobNutfield 04-12-2006 04:09 PM

I have to agree with MS3FGX. I, too, have Ubuntu installed on my wife's computer becuase she "just wants to point and click." But, when she does need some tweaking, it IS almost like you are dealing with XP because it is so hard to get under the hood with Ubuntu. Much more limiting than Slack or Fedora (my other home distro,) It's fine for her, but not for me because "point and click" is just about what it is designed for.

Bob

Linux.tar.gz 04-12-2006 07:08 PM

Just try. That's a good point with free software: you have the choice and the freedom. Make your own opinion.
If you want mine, Slackware is the best and you can do what you want, from wife's computer to server (guess which one is the most difficult? ;)).

IceChant 04-13-2006 06:36 AM

I tried Ubuntu, didn't like it I got rid of it after a week, as been said hard to tweak but as been said you should go and try it always try distro's you want it's better than missing good distro, I still sorry it took me long to try Slackware. :-)

roAder 04-13-2006 10:13 AM

Off Topic

How come when I download tgz packages on XP computers and then transfer the file via a CD or USB memory the file somehow turns into a tarball?

anyway to convert the package back to a tgz?

mazebane 04-13-2006 11:48 AM

I have recently switched back to Slackware form Ubuntu and it feels like coming home from holiday, comforting and familiar as opposed to fancy and unintelligible.

Its all about personal preference, I just like Slackware it works, its simple, I just don't understand people who say its difficult to install I find it very easy and quick.

Try both make your own mind up , my vote is Slackware.

I have to say once you slack you don't go back!

Alien_Hominid 04-13-2006 12:57 PM

The answer as all we know is Slackware. What do you think you will get if you are asking in Slackware forum? ;)

Cogar 04-13-2006 03:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uselpa
Both are very different distros.

Ubuntu is more easy to use, software is more readily available, it's for people who want to *use* Linux. Slackware is more for "hackers" who want to understand as much of the OS as possible. So it really depends on you.

Both Slackware (rumours) and Ubuntu (official) are about to release new versions, so you might want to wait a little before downloading.

Bump to this. Slackware and Ubuntu have completely different target audiences. Still, a person never knows "what they are" until they try both. (For example, in past years I never saw myself as a SUSE user, and here I am.) IMO, it will only take a quick tryout to determine which you prefer.

marsques 04-13-2006 03:43 PM

well in slackware to tweak something you've got to edit a configuration file... and presumably behind every gui there is bound to be a configuration file... so why is it then difficult to tweak something in ubuntu?


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