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dr.s 10-28-2012 10:49 AM

Slackpkg install-new question
 
1 Attachment(s)
Machine is running Slackware 14, many unused packages have been removed. When running "slackpkg install-new", it displays the following (see attachement):
  • bluedevil-1.2.3-i486-1.txz
  • calligra-2.4.3-i486-4.txz
  • wicd-kde-0.3.0_bcf27d8-i486-1.txz
  • quanta-29a3f8e_20111223git-i486-1.txz
In a Slack 14 VM, I tested this again and removed the whole kde series and some non-kde packages as well. "slackpkg install-new" listed only the kde packages to be installed. If i understood the slackpkg man page correctly, this shouldn't happen as this is not an upgrade to a new version and I'm not running current.
Code:

install-new
            This  action installs any new packages that are added to the offi-
            cial Slackware package set.  Run this if you  are  upgrading  your
            system to another Slackware version or if you are using -current.

Why does slackpkg only suggest the removed kde packages but not others? thunderbird and seamonkey were also removed for instance but the install-new option does not list them. In other words, it seems that only the kde series is treated as new.

Didier Spaier 10-28-2012 11:37 AM

Here new means "recently added among the official packages", according to the Changelog (looking for the 'added' word in it). It won't propose you already shipped packages you uninstalled or didn't install.

beder 10-28-2012 11:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Didier Spaier (Post 4816810)
Here new means "recently added among the official packages", according to the Changelog (looking for the 'added' word in it). It won't propose you already shipped packages you uninstalled or didn't install.

And that's why it says "Run this if you are upgrading your
system to another Slackware version or if you are using -current."

It's not designed to reinstall packages that ship in a FULL install that you might have uninstalled; for that you have run "install packagename" for each one of them

STDOUBT 11-01-2012 02:14 AM

If I might interject here...

Quote:

Originally Posted by beder (Post 4816812)
And that's why it says "Run this if you are upgrading your
system to another Slackware version or if you are using -current."

It's not designed to reinstall packages that ship in a FULL install that you might have uninstalled; for that you have run "install packagename" for each one of them

That's interesting. Beginning with 13.1 I've been using "install-new" as part of my regular updating:
# slackpkg update
# slackpkg install-new
# slackpkg upgrade-all

Not sure where I got the idea that this was the correct way to maintain a discrete Slackware version.

In the past, and on my other machine running 13.37, "install-new" has pulled in single packages which are indeed new to the running Slackware version.
So would I be correct in stating that during the lifetime of a specific Slackware version it is not to be expected that official packages be added?

I'm asking because I removed all of KDE (slackpkg remove kde), and can't run "install-new" without slackpkg wanting to re-install a big bunch of what I just removed.

Didier Spaier 11-01-2012 04:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by STDOUBT (Post 4819471)
So would I be correct in stating that during the lifetime of a specific Slackware version it is not to be expected that official packages be added?

I'm asking because I removed all of KDE (slackpkg remove kde), and can't run "install-new" without slackpkg wanting to re-install a big bunch of what I just removed.

Usually we don't see that much added packages in a stable version, but nobody can prevent PV to do that if so inclined as he is our BDFL ;)

About slackpkg what it does when invoked with the --install-new option is scanning the Changelog with following regular expression (quoted from /usr/libexec/slackpkg/install-new.awk on Slackware 13.37):
Code:

/^(a|ap|d|e|f|k|kde|kdei|l|mac|n|t|tcl|x|xap|y)\/([a-zA-Z0-9_\+.\-]+):.* ([Aa]dded|[Ss]plit|[Rr]enamed|[Mm]oved|[Nn]ame [Cc]hange|NAME CHANGE|[Ss]witched).*/
This catches not only "added" or "Added" but for instance "Name Change", "Renamed" or "Moved" as well.

Alien Bob 11-01-2012 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Didier Spaier (Post 4819532)
Usually we don't see that much added packages in a stable version, but nobody can prevent PV to do that if so inclined as he is our BDFL ;)

About slackpkg what it does when invoked with the --install-new option is scanning the Changelog with following regular expression (quoted from /usr/libexec/slackpkg/install-new.awk on Slackware 13.37):
Code:

/^(a|ap|d|e|f|k|kde|kdei|l|mac|n|t|tcl|x|xap|y)\/([a-zA-Z0-9_\+.\-]+):.* ([Aa]dded|[Ss]plit|[Rr]enamed|[Mm]oved|[Nn]ame [Cc]hange|NAME CHANGE|[Ss]witched).*/
This catches not only "added or Added" but for instance "Name Change", "Renamed" or "Moved" as well.

New packages are not being added to stable releases of Slackware.
There has been one exception to this rule when Pat added a kernel package to the patches of Slackware 13.0 to resolve a local root exploit that was getting much attention.
The ChangeLog will never have attributes of "Name Change", "Renamed" or "Moved" so there is no point in adding a check for this in slackpkg.

Eric

Didier Spaier 11-01-2012 05:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 4819575)
The ChangeLog will never have attributes of "Name Change", "Renamed" or "Moved" so there is no point in adding a check for this in slackpkg

I didn't express an opinion on the relevance of these checks, just wanted to inform accurately STDOUBT how slackpkg works in that case.

EDIT And 'grep Moved Changelog.txt' (Slackware 13.37) do output some results.

Alien Bob 11-01-2012 01:44 PM

Yeah you are right, I mis-read your post.

Eroc


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