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Old 06-05-2003, 09:32 PM   #1
tarballed
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Slack and software/packages


Just a couple of quick questions I wanted to ask about slack.
Being that I came from a Red Hat background (i'm officially converting to slack ) im curious as to how software and packages work with slackware.

Let me be more specific. With RH, you had your RPM's and you could go out and download source tarballs.

It seems to me that, with Slack, you can use RPMS, and you can use source tarballs that you can untar and do the normal ./configure -- options, make, make install, or whatever it calls for.

Slack also has the package system:
installpkg
explodepkg
etc.

Now, is the slack package system just a default way to install tarballs? I hope that makes sense.

Secondly, what are some suggestions on what I can do to really "feel" the power of slack? It can be anything, but does anyone have suggestions on some things I should try?

Thanks.

Tarballed
 
Old 06-05-2003, 10:03 PM   #2
Tinkster
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Re: Slack and software/packages

Quote:
Originally posted by tarballed
Just a couple of quick questions I wanted to ask about slack.
Being that I came from a Red Hat background (i'm officially converting to slack :) ) im curious as to how software and packages work with slackware.

Let me be more specific. With RH, you had your RPM's and you could go out and download source tarballs.

It seems to me that, with Slack, you can use RPMS, and you can use source tarballs that you can untar and do the normal ./configure -- options, make, make install, or whatever it calls for.

Slack also has the package system:
installpkg
explodepkg
etc.

Now, is the slack package system just a default way to install tarballs? I hope that makes sense.
Let's put it that way: Patrick has chosen
a simplistic way for his installation process,
and the ease proves him right... the *tgz's
you get from slackware-mirrors or linuxpackages.net
are binaries that the packagtools just put in
the right places, and that's it. They are not
to be confused with source-tarballs.

RPM's have a (theoretically!) smarter approach,
because the RPM wants to satisfy dependencies.
Slack-packages don't know anything about that,
and in source-tarballs you have to check them
(well, actually in most cases ./configure will do
that work for you ;})



Quote:
Originally posted by tarballed
Secondly, what are some suggestions on what I can do to really "feel" the power of slack? It can be anything, but does anyone have suggestions on some things I should try?

Thanks.

Tarballed
Haven't you FELT it yet? The speed? The elegance?

Cheers,
Tink
 
Old 06-05-2003, 10:07 PM   #3
manthram
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you can download source packages and compile. or you can download .tgz packages. in these packages you can see all the files which will be placed in the default slackware folders. if you use these you can easily uninstall the program or the package, if you compile auto uninstall is not a sure thing( i think you already know this )
 
Old 06-05-2003, 10:10 PM   #4
contrasutra
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pkgtool: The main package management system. From this ncurses tool, you can install/remove/check packages.
installpkg packagename.tgz: install the specified package.
removepkg packagename.tgz: you can figure out what this does.

Check "man pkgtool", "man installpkg", etc, to learn all the flags.

All these must be run as root by the way.


you CAN also install rpms, if you feel the need (not recommended, but RH9 rpms seem to work ok), by using this command: rpm2tgz filename.rpm , this is will convert it into a tgz, that you can install normally. Now, this strips its dependancy checking, so do your homework.


ALSO, if you want programs you have installed from source (tar.gz) to show up in packagetool for easy tracking/removal. Get CHECKINSTALL from the /extra directory on the slackware ftp. You run the "checkinstall" command instead of "make install" and it creates and installs a slack-pack out of the source. I HIGHLY recommend doing this.


linux-packages.net is a whole site devoted to slackware packages.

Last edited by contrasutra; 06-05-2003 at 10:12 PM.
 
Old 06-06-2003, 06:04 AM   #5
BigBadPenguin
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CHECKINSTALL... nice! I was wondering about this. Cheers contrasutra!
 
Old 06-06-2003, 03:23 PM   #6
Rodrin
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I second that recommendation to use checkinstall. Thanks to this program and the generic nature of Slackware I have the easiest time managing packages and source installs together on Slackware of any of the distributions of Linux I have tried. Let me clarify that. If you stick to .deb packages, Debian has about the easiest package management I can imagine. If you start using source packages as well, you run into problems. Checkinstall can help out a lot there as well, but it just doesn't work out as well as with Slackware.

Also about using RPMs, Slackware does come with the rpm program, and you can install RedHat RPMs with a certain amount of success. There are some pitfalls however. Slackware doesn't come with an RPM database that knows what you have installed in the system. You can initialize a database for rpm and it will begin to keep track of the programs you install, but getting it to know about everything you start out with is a huge task and rather pointless. If you wanted an RPM based distribution, you would have just used something else. You could also use rpm to install these packages with switches that bypass the dependency checking. This can be effective, but it creates a second record, the rpm database, of installed packages on your system that is not related at all to the first record, the pkgtool database. Because of this factor, even though rpm is installed on the system, I would recommend not using it to install packages. If there is an RPM that you really need for some reason, I would recommend trying rpm2tgz as Contrasutra suggested. That way the package you install will be managed the same way as all your other packages.
 
Old 06-06-2003, 03:32 PM   #7
tipaul
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Exclamation Packages Upgrade... + Checkinstall

Don't forget the "upgradepkg" command when you want to install a package that is already installed (with a different version)!!!

Because at first, I was always using installpkg even for upgrading and I had strange behavior in some applications...

Also... I have been creating .tgz packages from source... I took an how-to-do-it-by-yourself email that was really straight foward and easy... I think that is the best way... Why? Because some people, I don't know why?, say that making .tgz packages with Checkinstall isn't OK (see LinuxPackages.net... That most of checkinstall packages won't be accepted!)...

That was my two cents!
 
Old 06-06-2003, 03:50 PM   #8
JustSlack
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If you want to experience the power of Slack, try compiling source tarballs on SuSE or Mandrake and see the difference. Also get the kernel source and recompile the kernel for your hardware. It's great.
 
  


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