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-   -   Scared to Leave Slackware (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/scared-to-leave-slackware-347042/)

Murdock1979 07-26-2005 03:50 PM

Scared to Leave Slackware
 
Hello All!

I've been using only Slackware since I started using Linux. I'm very innocent, because I never attempted to use any other distro. I actually enjoy the command line interface - I'm an old DOS fan (let's face, there is no better way to get under the hood of the PC than DOS, even for Linux fans).

I hear scary things about other Linux Distros, but I feel like the innocent child who wants to leave the secure confines of his abode. Is it worth trying out other distros?

You see, nothing really tops Slackware, but there are times when there is just too much configuring and other busy stuff to deal with and wish there would be a faster way to do things. Of course I'll never change my own system to any other distro, but I can't afford to go through a lot of configuration when installing Linux on my friends' computers (call it a Linux crusade).

Any suggestions would be great!

Mords

titanium_geek 07-26-2005 03:54 PM

Awww...

Umm... pick something and dual boot it with slackware. :) you run the risk of yellling "you STUPID distro! let me DO something!" if you are used to slackware.

titanium_geek

Boby 07-26-2005 03:56 PM

Hello!

You can try an RPM based distro, like Fedora Core. I am using now CentOS 4, it's an RHEL free alternative and very stable.

Boby

flippantfig 07-26-2005 03:57 PM

The only way to know is to try another flavour. Maybe an RPM based distro like Fedora or Suse? You could sit there all night chewing the fat over which to choose, but if you are anything like me (and maybe a few others around here?!) you'll miss the Slackware 'thing'. Don't quite know how to describe it, its like a well fitting shoe, kinda.... ;)

Nylex 07-26-2005 03:59 PM

Try other distros, just remember Slack will welcome you back with open arms :).

maginotjr 07-26-2005 04:07 PM

I used debian before, it is very pro, and at the same time it has the best package tool, even better them RPM... apt-get with .deb packages are a blasting combo and i think you will enjoy it if you are used to slackware, debian gives you the easy of instaling and configuring things and at the same time you have the control of the line based commands distro...

Nille_kungen 07-26-2005 04:14 PM

I often manage other distributions so i tried alot of them.
But, theres nothing like the simplicity of slackware.
And you will scream 'stupid distro let me do this' it happens to me sometimes.
I love linux all of them but slackware is where i feel home.
For everything u win in gui u loose simplicity.
But try everything out maybe gentoo or debian maybe even suse.
But i think u will be back to slackware again.
But it's always good to know many distributions so try them.
Maybe get some Livecd's to play with diffrent distributions before u make an choice.
Remember whats great for me can be wrong for u.

xushi 07-26-2005 04:24 PM

Solaris :)

Go for it!

Nylex 07-26-2005 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by maginotjr
I used debian before, it is very pro, and at the same time it has the best package tool, even better them RPM... apt-get with .deb packages are a blasting combo and i think you will enjoy it if you are used to slackware, debian gives you the easy of instaling and configuring things and at the same time you have the control of the line based commands distro...
Personally, I couldn't get to grips with Debian. I liked apt-get, but I just found Debian did things a bit differently to other distros I'd used (I can't remember what things, specifically). It was just a pain in the rear end for me, I'm comfortable using Slack (despite not knowing much about how Linux works, etc). Just my 2 cents (or pence! :)).

xushi 07-26-2005 04:53 PM

IMO, to the untrained eye, different distros seem different. But once you get the hang of compiling, and script editing, you realise that most distros are more or less the same.

I still can't find a better distro than slack.. in terms of security, stability, ease of use, down to earth, etc... (this is just my oppinion). And i wanted to try a true unix OS.. I had a choice between freebsd or solaris, and i assumed solaris would look better on a CV , so i gave it a shot.

Solaris 10 is stable and nice, and its even better to use with the unofficial packages.

However, what does show the difference between distributions is the community. And so far, i can't find a better community than Slackware's.

ringwraith 07-26-2005 05:00 PM

If it is the configuration stuff that pains you, I would try one of the big distros that are marketed that way, Mandriva, Suse, Fedora. If your want a Debian based so you can get apt-get but still get some automagic configuration, maybe Ubuntu or Mepis.

If you have been with Slackware as long as it sounds, you'll be back :-)

Another consideration, install openbsd and find out what a pita it is to get set up.... Slack will seem like a walk in the park.

Ilgar 07-26-2005 05:13 PM

I'd recommend using other distros. This way you understand why Slack is better, and you love it even more :).

Murdock1979 07-26-2005 05:23 PM

Hello Again!

Thank you for all your help.

I am really happy that I found Slackware. Actually, it was only a coincidence, because way back when downloading was slower, I only had the time to download one CD, and Slackware comes on one CD (as opposed to other that are two or more). And then we bonded.

Anyway, does anyone think RedHat linux is worthwhile looking into?

Thanks,
Mords

BrianW 07-26-2005 06:30 PM

Might I suggest FreeBSD or OpenBSD?
They are very good learning experiences and you'll find that they are a little more familiar.

ibmercurial 07-26-2005 07:19 PM

Slack
 
I could fill books with what I don't know about Linux..
Mess around with a lot of them, lately playing with fedora core 4.. It seems nice, a little bit of pep and it seems to me the easiest to get xine working properly and YUM helps a lot.
Had to read for 3 days before I attempted to install gentoo, played with it for a few hours, then zeroed the drive.
The SuSE family seems okay to me especially if you're just migrating from winblos.
Debian is a lot of fun but the .deb thing and the "Debian Way" leave a sour taste in my mouth for some reason.
Yesterday I was messing around with SuSE 9.0 pro, installed all the C tools, automake, etc.etc.etc.and still had to install a million libraries to compile Gnu Backgammon-0.15.
Today I installed Slack 10.1 ( again ) and Gnu Backgammon compiled and installed without much fuss and its' performance ( Gnu Backgammons ) is far superior then it was in SuSE. Let me re-iterate, I ain't the sharpest knife in the draw, and I'm still trying to unglue my bottom lip from the mother-board after upgrading a stick of ram, but with all that non-sense being said, and as someone else suggested, try dual-booting Slack and Something else.. Run em back to back and weigh it out for yourself.
Personally I like Slack, A lot, Mostly because it just makes simple sense.. Everything about it.. No Wizzards, or special incantations necessary to re-bake a kernel.. .tgz is brilliant... No ridgid rules as to where the kernel source tree is located, no rpm or .deb nonsense, extract the kernel in your kitchen sink if you want, and as long as ya sym-link to it properly, it works. SOOOOOooooo ! After having said a whole bunch of nothing, give em all a whirl, but remember that once you go Slack, you never go Back.


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