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wigry 04-28-2014 12:54 PM

SBO request: CDE
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi,

Would like to know, s there a CDE SBo already created? I would like to try CDE out on a Slackware. Did try it out on an OpenBSD system due to its straight forward installation procedure. On Linux systems the installation does not seem to be as easy as on *BSD systems So I was thinking if somebody has already created an SBo tht will take all the hassle out of installing theCDE on Slackware box?

Anyway, here is my CDE screenshot taken on OpenBSD:
Attachment 15348

moisespedro 04-28-2014 01:05 PM

There you go
http://slackware.ponce.cc/blog/2013/...ckware64-14-1/

Mark Pettit 04-28-2014 02:30 PM

Ho ho - you like living in the 1980's ? :-)

szboardstretcher 04-28-2014 02:35 PM

Yeah man,.. that's awesome. Reminds me of Solaris!

Alien Bob 04-28-2014 03:31 PM

I have to use CDE everyday at work... I am always glad to return home and start a Slackware KDE session.

Eric

wigry 04-28-2014 04:10 PM

Thanks for the link :)

I don't know what it is for everyone regarding the horror of CDE and Solaris? I have CDE experience from IBM AIX and RS/6000 systems running Oracle database and since then it always have resembled to me a hardcore high-end unix power available only on commercial unixes and therefore out of reach for us - simple folks. Simply a serious workstation interface. And now I can transform media friendly Linux into one. I simply love the colors and the simplicity and all the feeling of CDE. A bit of it is even due to this beautiful article:

http://www.osnews.com/story/18969/pt_VII_CDE

I would actually hope that on one day, CDE will be part of standard Slackware image. Simply the philosophy of Slackware matches the philosophy of CDE - just get the work done.

WhiteWolf1776 04-28-2014 04:14 PM

CDE... are you serious? Are you in the pittsburgh area and enjoy Motif programming? If so give me a message as... I'm tired of working out xdesigner7 on this system ;)

wigry 04-28-2014 04:17 PM

Sorry I live in Eastern Europe, Estonia and am currently bound to a project dealing with hardcore C++ programming of MFC framework on industrial Windows CE handhelds. And I'm loving it too. BTW my Windows 7 desktop at work is an exact replica of Windows 2k :)

Richard Cranium 04-28-2014 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wigry (Post 5160811)
I don't know what it is for everyone regarding the horror of CDE and Solaris? I have CDE experience from IBM AIX and RS/6000 systems running Oracle database and since then it always have resembled to me a hardcore high-end unix power available only on commercial unixes and therefore out of reach for us - simple folks.

When I worked for these folks, our HP workstations came with CDE. After a couple of years dealing with it, I installed a local copy of FVWM and never, ever went back. Just having a virtual desktop was worth the change.

ReaperX7 04-28-2014 10:51 PM

CDE is a UNIX tradition. No getting around it. It's visually fugly as hell, but there's no denying that when you use CDE, you are using a piece of UNIX history, and it that way, CDE is a beautiful desktop.

However, more respectfully, Xfce was actually based on the concept of CDE. If you use the Xfce default profile, you can sort of see the traditional lay-outs and designs that stem from the traditional UNIX heritage these desktop environments carry.

wigry 04-29-2014 12:36 AM

Yes I am aware that XFCE was born because CDE was unavailable at the time. However now as the CDE is available, there is no point to use XFCE if the intention is to use CDE.

Also I really like old technology. One of my dreams is to work with mainframes, IBM3270 terminal and write some COBOL code. Also the operation side of the mainframe technology is magnificent in a way that first you load the BIOS that tells into which parts the machine is divided and how it operates. It is called IPL - Initial Program Load and only after that you start up the rest of the big box. The mainframe concepts are truly beautiful and they have been the same since the sixties.

Also I have no experience with VAX or any other obscure piece of computer history and would like to have a chance to get up close to those machines one day.

While everybody are looking for the latest and greatest bells and whistles away from the old and obscure, I have the urge to move the other way - to expand my knowledge and experience and skills.

If all you want is the program launcher the CDE will do just fine. Considering CDE fugly as hell is a matter of taste. I personally really really like the visuals of CDE. The screenshot I posted in the OP is a picture I could look all day. The default fonts are very nice, the terminal colors are one of the best I've seen.

However I believe that this thread has met its purpose and I would really like to close it as I do not want to turn it into the flamewar around CDE. However there does not seem to be an option like this in the Thread tools.

commandlinegamer 04-29-2014 04:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ReaperX7 (Post 5160991)
However, more respectfully, Xfce was actually based on the concept of CDE.

The early versions, based on the XForms toolkit (still in development), were very similar in look certainly.

tronayne 04-29-2014 06:54 AM

Ah, found memories of a SPARC-4 (later a SPARC-5 and still later a Sunfire), all CDE. And, before the Suns, Motorola MC68040 VME boxes with Tektronix color(!) terminal... oops, that was strictly X (still have the books, still refer every so often).

Nothing wrong with CDE. No bells, no whistles, no nonsense overhead, no eye-candy (well, you can do a photo for the desktop). Crack open a few terminal windows and away you go. Click-'n'-drool begone!

Might just download it and see what's what; thanks to ponce.

WhiteWolf1776 04-29-2014 07:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ReaperX7 (Post 5160991)
CDE is a UNIX tradition. No getting around it. It's visually fugly as hell, but there's no denying that when you use CDE, you are using a piece of UNIX history, and it that way, CDE is a beautiful desktop.

However, more respectfully, Xfce was actually based on the concept of CDE. If you use the Xfce default profile, you can sort of see the traditional lay-outs and designs that stem from the traditional UNIX heritage these desktop environments carry.

As I read this I am forced to recall... The outhouse is also a very old tradition... some things are better left in the past ;)

wigry 04-29-2014 07:47 AM

CDE should be looked as a welcome addition to window manager choice. Just like in the Slackware installation you have an option to choose either WindowMaker or FVWM or KDE or XFCE, it would be nice to have a CDE as an option in that list as well.

Once I even tried the TWM that comes bundled with X and starts up as a default when no WM has been chosen. It actualle rhas th iconify feature that also CDE has so that you can minimize open windows to "desktop". Once you can wrap your brain around that concept, the TWM actually became useful window manager although it lacks the dock but you can still define the desktop menu. So for basic window controlling, there are many many options. And I haven't covered the Tiled window manager which has again different approach to solving the problem of arranging windows.

Linux and other open source OSes are all about choice.


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