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Taleya 05-16-2007 09:14 PM

Rescuing Data from old kernel
 
Mornin' all.

I recently had to replace the motherboard in my slackware 10 box, from an AMD-powered Soyo system, to an intel SIS system.

Obviously, the build is not gonna like that.

However, (and I freely admit I'm a linux n00b) I can't get it to boot from a bare kernel so i can rescue the data before doing a tar&pave of the system. I've tried a boot disk, and had no luck, and LILO reckons that /dev/hda1 is not a valid boot partition (Duck feathers! it is too!) The partition is obviously extant, when booted raw, it boots off that partition (and jams halfway when it has a conniption fit with the completely different chipset)

Anyone suggest a quick and easy way to get the data off the disk? IF this were a windows system, I'd know a thousand and one back entrances, and worst case scenario would just pull out the HD, slave it to another system, pull the data and nuke it. I can't do that here.

Okie 05-16-2007 09:33 PM

use a live CD like Slax, copy the data you want to a partition that wont be wiped during install...

H_TeXMeX_H 05-16-2007 10:31 PM

Yeah, live CD is just the thing for this. Slax is good, so is knoppix, and others. (I always have one handy, just in case ... bah, who am I kidding, I make tons of backups anyway :))

Alien_Hominid 05-17-2007 05:14 AM

Can you boot the Slackware cd?
Mount the partition?
Chroot into it?
Rerun lilo?

I do not understand why you can't boot. I've also replaced my motherboard (burned my gigabyte :(, installed msi )with slightly diffrent chipset (both intel) and it worked wihout problems. Maybe your chipset is too different.

unixfool 05-17-2007 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien_Hominid

I do not understand why you can't boot. I've also replaced my motherboard (burned my gigabyte :(, installed msi )with slightly diffrent chipset (both intel) and it worked wihout problems. Maybe your chipset is too different.

Maybe he's using a kernel that's not taking into account his new hardware. I've also been through many motherboards swaps and didn't have to diddle with my kernel, but that doesn't mean others would be as lucky.

My thought is that more than just the motherboard was replaced, or maybe it is a very-recently released mobo and the specs are beyond what his kernel allows. With the type of technology we're using nowadays and the speed at which the technology is changing, I don't doubt he's having some issue that could be totally unrelated to user-error.

To the OP:
My suggestion is to try Slackware disk #1, as it has rescue capabilities. It also has other kernels you could try...its apparent that something has changed with your hardware that is conflicing with your current kernel.

Hern_28 05-17-2007 12:24 PM

bare kernel
 
Might want to try booting huge26.s or the test kernel if you updated hardware. that might get it going well enough to rescue saved data.

Taleya 05-18-2007 12:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien_Hominid
C
I do not understand why you can't boot. I've also replaced my motherboard (burned my gigabyte :(, installed msi )with slightly diffrent chipset (both intel) and it worked wihout problems. Maybe your chipset is too different.

Entirely different. I've swapped out a SOYO AMD Palomino system for a MSI Intel P4 system.

Thanks for the heads up guys, Slax did the job brilliantly! *woots*

Taleya 05-18-2007 12:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by unixfool
Maybe he's using a kernel that's not taking into account his new hardware.

She, actually. :P There are females, all around you....

Quote:

My suggestion is to try Slackware disk #1, as it has rescue capabilities. It also has other kernels you could try...its apparent that something has changed with your hardware that is conflicing with your current kernel.
Given how drastically I've had to change the system, I'd rather just tar & pave it and start from scratch - It's just a system that runs apache for a website, so apart from a couple of files from other people, I really won't shed any tears over the redo.

unixfool 05-18-2007 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Taleya
She, actually. :P There are females, all around you....

I was supposed to tell this how? :)

Quote:

Given how drastically I've had to change the system, I'd rather just tar & pave it and start from scratch - It's just a system that runs apache for a website, so apart from a couple of files from other people, I really won't shed any tears over the redo.
This could be a good learning experience for you, so that you know what to do when/if it happens again down the road. You may want to attempt to repair for experience-sake.

Alien_Hominid 05-18-2007 09:45 AM

If we talk about repair, shouldn't kernel support all available (which are already coded into the kernel) chipsets, because it (kernel) isn't built against particular kind of them. As Slackware kernel works with different chipsets, so her :) kernel should also work the same way. It might be only LILO issue.

unixfool 05-18-2007 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien_Hominid
If we talk about repair, shouldn't kernel support all available (which are already coded into the kernel) chipsets, because it (kernel) isn't built against particular kind of them. As Slackware kernel works with different chipsets, so her :) kernel should also work the same way. It might be only LILO issue.

My thought is that motherboard technology is changing constantly and she may have bought a motherboard that utilizes a chipset that the kernel developers haven't even seen yet. I believe when Nvidia started delving into motherboards, the kernel community was having issues getting kernels to work seamlessly with the technology. The same goes for wireless card support, sound card support, and any other hardware support. Kernel development takes time, and pain is felt when new technology is released...time is needed to develop the code for newly released chipset (for example).

Alien_Hominid 05-18-2007 10:21 AM

1) My point was that if her kernel was rather new, it might have had the support for the motherboard (msi and p4 aren't the latest and greatest, have a pair of them too, they were working with 2.4 without problems). So maybe rerunning lilo might have fixed everything. I don't know.

2) So why does xp install work almost anytime, on every x86 based system? Or there are too small number of linux kernel devs, so they can't develop drivers quickly?

unixfool 05-18-2007 11:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien_Hominid
1) My point was that if her kernel was rather new, it might have had the support for the motherboard (msi and p4 aren't the latest and greatest, have a pair of them too, they were working with 2.4 without problems). So maybe rerunning lilo might have fixed everything. I don't know.

2) So why does xp install work almost anytime, on every x86 based system? Or there are too small number of linux kernel devs, so they can't develop drivers quickly?

#1: Point taken...sort of. See my comments under #2.

#2...dunno. I've replaced motherboards on windows systems and the system would flat-out not boot up or would boot up but generate tons of errors.

I don't think its the fact that XP or Linux won't work well with new motherboards. I'm relating to the OP's issue. Changing hardware such as motherboards on a system that already has an OS installed may lead you to a point where the the current system won't know what to do with the newly detected hardware because it's only accounting for the hardware installed before the old motherboard was swapped out for a new one. Note that Slack's default kernel is pretty open-ended and will probably detect almost anything...dunno if the OP actually recompiled the base kernel.

Swapping out a mobo shouldn't tank an install, BUT, say you added a SATA drive along with the new mobo...you will most likely run into issues if the kernel that is being used wasn't compiled to use SATA. If this can happen, I'm pretty sure that the same can happen with 'just' a mobo swap. We see it happening all the time with wifi cards, where the vendor changes the chipset to something that isn't accountable by the module or kernel.


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