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-   -   Primary and secondary, slave and master. (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/primary-and-secondary-slave-and-master-4175436879/)

stf92 11-13-2012 01:02 AM

Primary and secondary, slave and master.
 
Hi:
I have four SATA connectors in my motherboard. Is there any distinction among them, as in the case of IDE, where some of a given installed set of connectors are primary and other secondary? As an example, I see in my machine the hard (fixed) disk is connected to SATA 1 and the optical drive to SATA 0, which at first sight seems odd to me.

malekmustaq 11-13-2012 01:30 AM

Quote:

Is there any distinction among them, as in the case of IDE, where some of a given installed set of connectors are primary and other secondary?
Both: It matters and doesn't matter much. It matters because one of the two has the precedence over the other, 0 precedes 1, in the machine language. Though in the BIOS configuration you can manually choose which of the two is given the privilege to boot the kernel.

Quote:

As an example, I see in my machine the hard (fixed) disk is connected to SATA 1 and the optical drive to SATA 0, which at first sight seems odd to me.
I usually do it with my machines:

Optical --> 0
Hard disk > 1

The optical drive (CD/DVD) is the consolation to booting problem, that should be given the privilege. Don't bother when your Gnu/Linux is already running, it is no longer the wired '0 and 1' that matters because up there at runtime all devices are marshaled (monitored, controlled, accounted for) by the udev daemon automatically for you.

Hope that helps.

Salud.

stf92 11-13-2012 01:52 AM

Well, gracias, I understand. However, this being my first time with SATA, i'd like to get deeper into the matter. And so lets do as if udev did not exist, or suppose I do not use udev at all. Then I repeat my questions in post #1. That is, is the concept of primary and secondary no longer valid? And what about master/slave?

EDIT: Hum... I believe you already answered that too: the BIOS setup menu. But then all distinctions have to do ONLY with boot precedence?

cascade9 11-13-2012 01:53 AM

No master/slave, whips/chains with SATA.

I normally install HDDs to the lower number ports and optical drives at the end with SATA systems.

stf92 11-13-2012 01:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cascade9 (Post 4828117)
No master/slave, whips/chains with SATA. [...]

Good sense of humor, cascade. I was about to go to wiktionary when I understood the metaphor.

malekmustaq 11-13-2012 02:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4828120)
Good sense of humor, cascade. I was about to go to wiktionary when I understood the metaphor.

Bwahahaha

malekmustaq 11-13-2012 03:00 AM

Quote:

But then all distinctions have to do ONLY with boot precedence?
Not the boot precedence but the inside. SATA is a serial bus, not parallel where one has to be enslaved by the egyptians. The difference cannot matter to us, it merely occurs in the machine, the north bridge of the motherboard, it handles the mathematical pointers to the memory.

TracyTiger 11-13-2012 03:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stf92 (Post 4828095)
Hi:
I have four SATA connectors in my motherboard. Is there any distinction among them ...

Although SATA doesn't have the Master/Slave setup as others have mentioned, there can be differences in the SATA ports on a single motherboard.

The SATA ports may differ in speed - SATA revision 2 (3 GB/s) versus SATA revision 3 (6 GB/s).

The SATA ports may support AHCI mode or IDE emulation mode (still no master/slave involved). This mostly affects MS Win XP operating system that doesn't support AHCI.

The different SATA ports can be connected to different manufacturer's controllers. Usually only on boards with a larger number of SATA ports.

Typically when there is a difference among the SATA ports the motherboard manufacturer will change the color of the connectors (red, black, blue, white). If they are all the same color they probably all have the same speed and AHCI capability.

A newer board with only 4 SATA ports probably has the same capability on all 4 ports.

Just to let you know that there can be differences between SATA ports on a single board.

cascade9 11-13-2012 04:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Tiger (Post 4828190)
The SATA ports may differ in speed - SATA revision 2 (3 GB/s) versus SATA revision 3 (6 GB/s).

Intel only. I really wish they had of put all SATA-III ports on the newer chipsets, but thats intel for you.....

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Tiger (Post 4828190)
The SATA ports may support AHCI mode or IDE emulation mode (still no master/slave involved). This mostly affects MS Win XP operating system that doesn't support AHCI.

You can use AHCI with winXP. Installing to a AHCI SATA HDD is impossible 'out of the box' with XP but you can use nLite to slipstream the AHCI drivers into the install disc. Or you can install them during the install process (requires a floppy drive...great thinking microsoft).

IDE emulation mode is meant more for DOS and other OSes with no way to install the SATA/AHCI drivers.

Some BIOS do list SATA in IDE emulation mode with 'master/slave', but AFAIK there is no impact on reality. They are just using the old naming convention

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Tiger (Post 4828190)
The different SATA ports can be connected to different manufacturer's controllers. Usually only on boards with a larger number of SATA ports.

Those jmicron et all extra controllers you get on some boards are near enough to junk with windows. With linux and the awful support they all seem to have, they are best avoided.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tracy Tiger (Post 4828190)
A newer board with only 4 SATA ports probably has the same capability on all 4 ports.

I know from other threads its a H61 chipset, with 4 x SATA-II. %&$& intel with those cut down chipsets......


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