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View Poll Results: Are you using a tiling windowmanager with Slackware?
Yes, I'm using a tiling WM 24 18.75%
No, but I've heard about it 45 35.16%
No, but I'm considering to install one 10 7.81%
Yes, from time to time I use a tiling WM 7 5.47%
Yes, from time to time, depending on what I'm doing 3 2.34%
No, I tried one but I didn't like it 19 14.84%
I don't know what a tiling WM is 20 15.63%
Voters: 128. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-31-2012, 08:16 PM   #31
astrogeek
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Quote:
Originally Posted by padeen View Post
BTW, tmux tip of the day: if you don't like the scrollback action of having to use Mod-[ then scroll up a line at a time, you can just type the Mod key followed by PgUp/PgDn. Wish I'd known that one before now.
Wow! Thanks - wish I had known that one too! I started using tmux 4-5 months ago and don't know how I got along without it.
 
Old 07-31-2012, 08:38 PM   #32
T3slider
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Quote:
Originally Posted by padeen View Post
BTW, tmux tip of the day: if you don't like the scrollback action of having to use Mod-[ then scroll up a line at a time, you can just type the Mod key followed by PgUp/PgDn. Wish I'd known that one before now.
Mod+[, Ctrl+D/U/B/F for half-/full-screen scrolling, as in vim. It's the same in GNU screen. And of course gg/G work as well to go to the top/bottom of the scrollback buffer.

Last edited by T3slider; 07-31-2012 at 08:39 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 08-01-2012, 02:19 AM   #33
tc_
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I'm using XMonad. but agree with those that already said that including a tiling wm into stock slackware seems difficult.
 
Old 08-01-2012, 03:37 AM   #34
markush
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tc_ View Post
I'm using XMonad. but agree with those that already said that including a tiling wm into stock slackware seems difficult.
Well, it's more difficult with XMonad since it has many dependencies due to haskell.

dwm or wmii are very easy to integrate (in my opinion).

@tc_, why do you think that including a tiling WM into stock-Slackware is difficult in general? Could you please explain it in more detail?

Markus
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:40 AM   #35
tc_
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@markush:
Be careful, rant ahead I love tiling wms and I am not so biased, as it might sound below!

XMonad, as you said, has ghc as dependency.

As far as I know, dwm needs compile time configuration. This makes packaging dwm quite bizarre.
Either one ships a package which is not configurable to the users needs, or the plain sourcecode
and a Slackbuild. The sources together with a Slackbuild, however, might equally well be downloaded.
Moreover, shipping the source code and letting the user fiddle with it, looks like not adhering to
Slackware's principles. No guarantee can be given, that this stock-Slackware package will be stable
or usable.

This argument, of course, does not apply to wmii, i3, etc.
Actually, I read a bit about wmii, and wmii seems a good candidate for inclusion into Slackware.

However, in my opinion, if you include one, you probably should include several. There are a dozen tiling
wm's, each with a more or less loyal userbase. Including one of these wm's will make a couple of hundred
users happy, but disappoint a lot more users. Furthermore, configuring tiling wm's to "sane defaults" seems
quite difficult, since almost each and every single user has modified his/her wm to his/her likings.
I somehow like the idea to let the user choose a tiling wm for KDE or Gnome as alternative, which seems a
"sane default" to me, but is not always possible without some mess.

Possibly disappointing users and shipping niche-software with defaults, that do not fit the needs of the bulk of
users, seems quite a high price -- especially since most tiling wm users should be able to install their wm
by hand.
 
Old 08-02-2012, 03:47 AM   #36
sycamorex
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Quote:
This argument, of course, does not apply to wmii, i3, etc.
Actually, I read a bit about wmii, and wmii seems a good candidate for inclusion into Slackware.
What's wrong with i3? LOL
Quote:
However, in my opinion, if you include one, you probably should include several. There are a dozen tiling
wm's, each with a more or less loyal userbase. Including one of these wm's will make a couple of hundred
users happy, but disappoint a lot more users.
You can please some people sometimes but you can't please all the people all the time.
Quote:
especially since most tiling wm users should be able to install their wm
by hand.
That's a fair point. I think that as tiling WMs users here are slackers at the same time, we are just being lazy
 
Old 08-02-2012, 05:48 AM   #37
NoStressHQ
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I'm in love with Haskell... And one day I'd like to try XMonad... Just a trip .

BTW, I also believe that despite a "maybe" high slope learning curve, you should be able to be super fast using a good tiling manager...

Keyboard rules !

Cheers

Garry.
 
Old 08-02-2012, 05:55 AM   #38
NoStressHQ
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
but I don't yet have any advantages from Haskell because
... YES ! You just said it before
Quote:
I find it more stable and bugfree than the others
that's one of the numerous benefits of Haskell. Haskell is a pure functional language and so it isolates the possible side effects in a thin part of the code, avoiding a lot of bugs, and increasing the overall stability. Also Haskell is compiled in native binaries, so it's super-fast (comparing to what features it supports)...

Slackware, Haskell, what else ?

(Yes I'm a C/C++ programmer BUT I dream about more Haskell in the 'real world industry'...)
 
Old 08-02-2012, 06:21 AM   #39
tc_
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
What's wrong with i3? LOL
Nothing in particular is wrong with i3.
That comment wasn't meant as comparison of wmii and i3.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sycamorex View Post
You can please some people sometimes but you can't please all the people all the time.
That's true, for sure... But my point was that the fraction of people pleased by the inclusion of a single tiling
wm into Slackware is rather small.
 
Old 08-02-2012, 10:59 PM   #40
EnigmaticFellow
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As both a Slackware user and programmer, Ratpoison has been working well for me so far even though I only started using it a few days ago. I really like the lack of window borders as well as being able to control how windows are laid out. And using it along with Conkeror as my web browser allows me to completely ignore the mouse except for the odd flash application on a web page which I'm forced to deal with.

But as for including a tiling WM on Slackware, it would have to be something which uses few dependecies. Ratpoison comes to mind in that regard. Another option could possibly be Awesome, though Cairo would have to be compiled with xcb support.
 
Old 08-03-2012, 02:48 AM   #41
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tc_ View Post
Nothing in particular is wrong with i3.
That comment wasn't meant as comparison of wmii and i3.
No worries. I was just joking.


This is my biased comparison of tiling wms.

Mostly it covers dependencies only and doesn't include additional packages like status bars, dmenu because most of the manager need them anyway. Sometimes I put ?, which means that I haven't used it long enough to know. The only wm that I know pretty well is i3. That's why I call it my biased comparison.


dwm
Pros: no additional dependencies
Cons: Config in C, (EDIT: insane default keybindings. See post #42)

wmii
Pros: ?
Cons: depends on: libixp

i3
Pros: powerful and easy config syntax, easily scriptable (python/ruby/perl), flexible window management
Cons: dep: libev, yajl

Awesome
Pros: includes a statusbar by default
Cons: a few dependencies but most importantly stock Slackware-intrusive - Cairo

Xmonad
Pros: config in Haskell
Cons: Way too many dependencies, size, config in Haskell.

spectrwm

I have never used it but apparently it is very intuitive.


While I'm a big fan of i3, in this situation probably dwm has the strongest case to be included in Slackware (IMO).

Last edited by sycamorex; 08-03-2012 at 06:29 AM. Reason: Haskell is spelt with double l
 
Old 08-03-2012, 06:22 AM   #42
GazL
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'dwm' would require Pat to break his 'ship as upstream intended' rule. The default keybindings are completely useless as they clash with the hot-keys of pretty much every application out there. I've modified both the mouse and keybinding on my dwm setup to be far more logical/consistent and I'm very happy with it, but if I were presented with it using the defaults I'd be running to the hills screaming before 5 minutes were out.

BTW, there is a patch available which adds a systray to 'dwm'. I'm not using it at present as I found I don't really need a systray, but I did try it for a while and it works well.
 
Old 08-03-2012, 06:25 AM   #43
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL View Post
'dwm' would require Pat to break his 'ship as upstream intended' rule. The default keybindings are completely useless as they clash with the hot-keys of pretty much every application out there. I've modified both the mouse and keybinding on my dwm setup to be far more logical/consistent and I'm very happy with it, but if I were presented with it using the defaults I'd be running to the hills screaming before 5 minutes were out.

BTW, there is a patch available which adds a systray to 'dwm'. I'm not using it at present as I found I don't really need a systray, but I did try it for a while and it works well.
Oh, I wasn't aware of that. Thanks
 
Old 08-03-2012, 06:43 AM   #44
a4z
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KDE can also be used as tiling windowmanager

anyone using it?
 
Old 08-03-2012, 06:48 AM   #45
sycamorex
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Quote:
Originally Posted by a4z View Post
KDE can also be used as tiling windowmanager

anyone using it?
I tried KDE4.x tiling mode a few years ago and found it extremely buggy. Things might have changed by now.
 
  


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