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Old 08-31-2009, 09:34 AM   #1
pokipoki08
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Please seed Slackware 13 torrents


Both Slackware 13 x86 & x86_64 torrents have been completed 5600 times total. Please seed to help others to get the isos.

Thank you.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 10:11 AM   #2
forrestt
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I'll start my torrent to seed again. I must say, the only reason I turned it off was that the upload speed dropped to 0 yesterday. It is back up over 100KiB/s now, so I'll keep it running again. I'm not a slacker, and I can't really say I like it all that much (three attempts and I haven't gotten a running system yet). The only thing I've really seen so far is the installer and it is about as user friendly as a two legged step-stool. However, I'm not one to keep someone from becoming a Linux Acrobat if that is what they want to be . I'll hold the hoops, but I'm not that interested in jumping through them to get a functioning system.

Forrest

Last edited by forrestt; 08-31-2009 at 10:12 AM.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 10:24 AM   #3
multios
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seeding D1 & D2 (but did stop while installing 13 on different computers.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 10:47 AM   #4
tommcd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt View Post
I'm not a slacker, and I can't really say I like it all that much (three attempts and I haven't gotten a running system yet). The only thing I've really seen so far is the installer and it is about as user friendly as a two legged step-stool. However, I'm not one to keep someone from becoming a Linux Acrobat if that is what they want to be....
You don't have to be a linux acrobat to use Slackware, you just need to be able to use some basic linux terminal commands. If you really want to be a Slacker, the first step is to read the slack book:
http://slackbook.org/html/book.html
The slack basics site is also very good:
http://www.slackbasics.org/html/
Also, the Slackware How To, and the Changes And Hints.txt are a must read also. They are available on the first Slackware CD, or any Slackware mirror:
http://slackware.oregonstate.edu/sla...lackware-HOWTO
http://slackware.oregonstate.edu/sla..._AND_HINTS.TXT
Once yo begin to appreciate the elegant beauty and simplicity of the KISS principle, you will begin to appreciate Slackware. There is a learning curve to using Slackware, but it is worth it.
Also, the fact that Slackware is bullet-proof stable is a big part of the advantages to using Slackware.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 11:47 AM   #5
forrestt
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I have all the knowledge necessary to do just about any systems engineering task w/ Linux. That is what I do for a living, and have done for 13 years. I have been using Linux since 1995. Back then everything was a process of hoop jumping. Everything had to be downloaded as source and compiled locally. It was a pain in the butt. As I got older, other more important things came along to fill my time, and Linux hoop jumping isn't one of them. The install reminds me of what I had back then. Is it simple? NO, IT IS NOT!!! Simple for the programmers perhaps, but not for the end user. You basically have 2 options, expert or novice. And it says right there, novice will take a year to install. And really, EVERYTHING is the recommended installation choice? Well, I guess that makes it simple. Not what I want, but simple. I would agree, you can USE Slackware w/o being an acrobat. Installing it is a different story.

As far as bullet-proof stable, an installed system that won't boot is not stable, unless by stable you mean "not changing".

Forrest
 
Old 08-31-2009, 11:52 AM   #6
Cata1yst
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt View Post
I have all the knowledge necessary to do just about any systems engineering task w/ Linux. That is what I do for a living, and have done for 13 years. I have been using Linux since 1995. Back then everything was a process of hoop jumping. Everything had to be downloaded as source and compiled locally. It was a pain in the butt. As I got older, other more important things came along to fill my time, and Linux hoop jumping isn't one of them. The install reminds me of what I had back then. Is it simple? NO, IT IS NOT!!! Simple for the programmers perhaps, but not for the end user. You basically have 2 options, expert or novice. And it says right there, novice will take a year to install. And really, EVERYTHING is the recommended installation choice? Well, I guess that makes it simple. Not what I want, but simple. I would agree, you can USE Slackware w/o being an acrobat. Installing it is a different story.

As far as bullet-proof stable, an installed system that won't boot is not stable, unless by stable you mean "not changing".

Forrest
I guess youve never tried gentoo then. Installing Gentoo makes slackware look like a cake walk
 
Old 08-31-2009, 12:06 PM   #7
forrestt
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Sabayon is based on gentoo, and I have used it. After a week or so, I gave up on it and went back to Fedora. I tried gentoo years ago, and it isn't for me either. I don't want to spend my time getting my computer to work. I just want it to work, not me to work.

Forrest
 
Old 08-31-2009, 12:15 PM   #8
easuter
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I'm seeding the DVDs, FWIW.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 12:24 PM   #9
hitest
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Thumbs down

Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt View Post
I don't want to spend my time getting my computer to work. I just want it to work, not me to work.
Each to his own. Slackware is very stable and it also has new software included with 13.0. You complain that Slackware doesn't change. What is a weakness for you is a strength for me. Slackware works for me, I set it up and it runs forever without crashing. By the way I stopped using Fedora at FC3, as it is far too buggy for my tastes.
Slackware difficult to install?! Pffft.
Slackware does assume that you have some command line experience and that you know how to use a text editor. Also, you do need to read the support documentation to install Slackware. Don't write off our software for new users because you are not willing to put out some effort.
Bad form in my opinion. I don't post in the Fedora/Red Hat forums and criticize your distro of choice.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 12:47 PM   #10
niels.horn
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I downloaded and continue seeding the two DVDs.

Just out of curiosity: do people still download de CDs?
(maybe I should start a poll instead of asking here )
 
Old 08-31-2009, 12:57 PM   #11
Jeebizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt

The install reminds me of what I had back then. Is it simple? NO, IT IS NOT!!!
Try installing OpenBSD , no ncurses at all. Just pure text. See if your opinion about ncurses changes a little.

I prefer ncurses anyways. In my view it is already a GUI. If it has boxes, coloured menus even though there is no mouse, it is still a GUI.


I also challenge those who say Windows setups are easier... Really? What about at the very beginning? You aren't really presented with a point and click option. It is the classic NT setup/partitioning. It is not until a reboot when the rest of the installation takes place, do you even get a point and click interface. This is true for NT up to NT-XP. I don't know how Vista, and Win7 are.

Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt

Simple for the programmers perhaps, but not for the end user.
I have yet to write a single line of code using Slackware. I am by no means a programmer (though I am majoring in Computer Science. and must take a few programming courses for my degree).
 
Old 08-31-2009, 01:02 PM   #12
forrestt
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I didn't complain that Slackware doesn't change. I haven't ever used it, so why would I care about it changing. The only thing that I said at all that had to do with changing is that a system that won't boot won't change and is therefore stable if your definition of stable is "non-changing" (and that is a valid definition for stable under certain circumstances, one of which is what you are referring to as stable in your post). I am also seeding the torrent for the benefit of the Slackware community, not mine. I'm doing that because I have a lot of respect for Slackers and want to help out where I can.

The statement, "you just need to be able to use some basic linux terminal commands" I find offensive. I have plenty of command-line experience. I WRITE Linux system installers for a living, so I do know what I'm talking about. I've stated my credentials. If you would like to see my resume, I'll send it to you. Slackware's installer is NOT simple. This is coming from an expert both in installers and in Linux. I have yet to see how well Slackware itself works as I haven't gotten it to boot yet. When I do, my opinion of the OS will be able to be made. If you want to run Slackware then please do. I will do what I can to support you and anyone else who decides to run Slackware. However, my opinion of the installer is that it is difficult, and that is all I have said. I don't see why that should offend you, it is just fact. When an expert level person has trouble doing something that (s)he is an expert in, then by definition it is difficult.

I am also not writing off your software for new users, and I AM putting out some effort. I AM STILL TRYING TO INSTALL IT. And I will continue trying until I am successful. I will then play around with it and see how the system itself works. Who knows, I may like it enough to start using it permanently. However, my opinion of the installer will not change. I could probably make the installer a lot more user friendly, but I'm starting to think that you all like it that way.

Forrest

p.s. Jeebizz, I was referring to the programmers of the installer.

Last edited by forrestt; 08-31-2009 at 01:08 PM. Reason: added p.s.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 01:09 PM   #13
Jeebizz
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt

Slackware's installer is NOT simple.
I still am having trouble with this statement: In what way is it not simple? The layout? Or is it just because of ncruses itself?

Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestt

However, my opinion of the installer will not change. I could probably make the installer a lot more user friendly, but I'm starting to think that you all like it that way.
Thats an interesting idea though. You could offer an alternate with the PXE loader. I am curious to see what installer you would provide. I would use it myself. What is your definition of 'simple', by the way?
 
Old 08-31-2009, 01:30 PM   #14
easuter
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Quote:
I am also not writing off your software for new users, and I AM putting out some effort. I AM STILL TRYING TO INSTALL IT
The only effort necessary is to read the instructions.
 
Old 08-31-2009, 01:33 PM   #15
forrestt
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My definition of simple is easy to use. For example, suppose I am in the middle of the package choosing screen and for some stupid reason I hit return (like I did the first time I tried to install). There is no way to go back to picking the apps on the previous group. Sure, you say, don't hit return. But what choice do I have AFTER I've accidentally done it? A "simple" solution would be to provide a means to go back. Difficult from the programmers perspective as they have to add a bit more logic to the installer, but "simple" from the user's perspective. Now, I'm sure someone will come back and inform me of how to go back to the previous group to continue with the app picking, but it will not be as simple as hitting "back". It is much harder to make a text based installer as easy to use as an X based installer for the main reason that you have a lot more real estate to work with in X than you do in a normal text based system. With more real estate comes more places to put helpful information. However, you also have to deal with systems that can't run a GUI. And if you are going to pick one installer to support, it should be the one that will work on the most number of systems. I understand the desire to keep the 80x24 char installer. I don't understand the desire to make it hard for the end user by not adding simple features.

I have now gotten Slackware installed. Now I just need to figure out how to add packages so I can get the VBox video driver installed (No, that isn't a question, I'll figure it out very quickly after I post this I'm sure).

Forrest
 
  


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