LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 05-18-2012, 12:23 PM   #1
thund3rstruck
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: East Coast, USA
Distribution: Fedora 18, Slackware64 13.37, Windows 7/8
Posts: 346

Rep: Reputation: 38
Package Management Best Practices


Hoping some experts here can clarify a few things for me because I don't want to get too far down the road only to have an epiphany that I made some critical mistakes early on.

Patches
1. What is the recommended place to store downloaded patches?

I'm using Alienbob's patch sync script (http://connie.slackware.com/~alien/t...are_patches.sh) to download the patches and I downloaded them to /home/ftp/pub/Linux/Slackware/<arch>/patches/packages/ because that's where the script defaulted them to.

2. Are the patches in <mirror>/patches/packages only security updates or are they general software updates?

In other words, is there any chance that a patch might conflict with (or break) a replacement package from the AlienBob's repo? I understand I can make an exclusion, I just don't know if that's necessary for patches.

Slackbuilds
I'm using sbopkg (http://www.slackpkg.org) for interacting with slackbuilds.org. I think that program is downloading into /tmp but I'm not 100% sure about that yet.

3. Are binaries built with sbopkg supposed to stored in a specific directory (I imaging they would need to be in order to be able uninstall them later). How about the source? Is that supposed to be stored in a specific directory?

slackpkg
4. Is slackpkg just the software on the DVD or does it include newer versions of the software on the DVD?

5. If it includes newer software then where should the packages (and source) be downloaded?

Un-installing software
I did a full install since I've never used Slack and I didn't know how well the packaging tools would work. Now I realized that slackware installed a trillion programs, most of which are duplicates (why are there like 7 text editors?). Now I want to start removing pretty much everything other than my core set of 10 or so programs I use on a regular basis.

6. If I use removepkg and that only removes the program, isn't it going to leave behind all its dependant libraries?

Sorry to make this so long but I've been reading the manual (RTFM) for a few days now and I'm still trying to work out the right way to do these things (freedom is great; but just because you can download anywhere doesn't mean you should --i'm sure over the years some best practices have bubbled up about the right way to deal with packages in slack

Cheers!
 
Old 05-18-2012, 12:37 PM   #2
slakmagik
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 4,113

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
1. What is the recommended place to store downloaded patches?
Wherever you want. Once installed, you can even delete them if you choose. I just sync a Slackware tree in /home/slackware.

Quote:
2. Are the patches in <mirror>/patches/packages only security updates or are they general software updates?
Generally security only. Feature upgrades happen in -current.

Quote:
3. Are binaries built with sbopkg supposed to stored in a specific directory (I imaging they would need to be in order to be able uninstall them later). How about the source? Is that supposed to be stored in a specific directory?
Storing them has nothing to do with uninstalling them. Uninstalling them uses the standard slackware tool, removepkg, and relies on package data in /var/log/packages. As with patches, you can do whatever you want with the package after you've installed it. Sbopkg defaults to saving them for easy reinstallation if needed.

Quote:
4. Is slackpkg just the software on the DVD or does it include newer versions of the software on the DVD?
You can set up the source slackpkg uses. If the DVD, it's just the DVD. If you use a local or remote mirror, the latest patches (or, if using -current, the latest everything) will be available.

Quote:
5. If it includes newer software then where should the packages (and source) be downloaded?
I'm getting a feeling you haven't read at least the slackpkg manual. But, again, it doesn't really matter.

Quote:
6. If I use removepkg and that only removes the program, isn't it going to leave behind all its dependant libraries?
Yes.

Quote:
I've been reading the manual (RTFM) for a few days now
Which "manual"?

Quote:
just because you can download anywhere doesn't mean you should
Very true. Use official Slackware mirrors, SBo, and go directly to the source and build it yourself if necessary.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-18-2012, 01:11 PM   #3
thund3rstruck
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: East Coast, USA
Distribution: Fedora 18, Slackware64 13.37, Windows 7/8
Posts: 346

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 38
Thanks for your feedback. The point of my question was Best Practices though. I understand I can do whatever the hell I want to do but all IT is more or less that way. I can hook new System.Data.SqlClient.SqlCommand("DELETE FROM myTable"); but that doesn't mean I should. Through years of solution development we have established Best Practices that articulate the best ways of accomplishing and managing things. In the case above, we implement NHibernate OR/M mapping abstractions to deal with scalability and cross platform solutions.

I apologize for the Microsoft reference there but I'm a Windows developer.

I really want to know what the best practice is. Should an administrator download packages from the mirror into a specific location on the workstation. Are there any standards in place to guide administrators on these types of practices?

Thanks again!

PS: I can't seem to find anything even remotely comparable to the UbuntuGuide.org wiki out there for slackware. Has anyone considered creating a Slackware wiki to put all this information in a single central place? The Slackbook is a decent starting point and there's a tiny wiki here but again, nothing like the wikis you see for other distributions.
 
Old 05-18-2012, 02:14 PM   #4
dugan
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2003
Location: Canada
Distribution: distro hopper
Posts: 4,546

Rep: Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386Reputation: 1386
Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
3. Are binaries built with sbopkg supposed to stored in a specific directory (I imaging they would need to be in order to be able uninstall them later). How about the source? Is that supposed to be stored in a specific directory?
You don't need to keep either of them.

Uninstalling (as I'm sure you know), is done with "removepkg packagename", as in "removepkg emacs". Slackware has a single file listing its installed packages (/var/log/packages). So if you forget what the last letter in "emacs" is (and I know this is a bad example) then you can still uninstall it with "grep emac /var/log/packages | xargs removepkg".

Last edited by dugan; 05-18-2012 at 03:32 PM.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-18-2012, 02:34 PM   #5
thund3rstruck
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: East Coast, USA
Distribution: Fedora 18, Slackware64 13.37, Windows 7/8
Posts: 346

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
You don't need to keep either of them.

Uninstalling (as I'm sure you know), is done with "removepkg packagename", as in "removepkg emacs". Slackware has a single file listing its installed packages (/var/log/packages). So if you forget what the last letter in "emacs" is (and I know this is a bad example) then you an still uninstall it with "grep /var/log/packages emac | xargs removepkg".
Great! So then I don't ever need the binary or source again. That's quite different than I was expecting. We use (MSI) installer packages for our windows products, and the MSI (or some form of it) must remain on the machine essentially forever in order to repair or uninstall it (cleanly) later.

Awesome Thanks!
 
Old 05-18-2012, 09:36 PM   #6
allend
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2003
Location: Melbourne
Distribution: Slackware-current
Posts: 3,378

Rep: Reputation: 824Reputation: 824Reputation: 824Reputation: 824Reputation: 824Reputation: 824Reputation: 824
Quote:
6. If I use removepkg and that only removes the program, isn't it going to leave behind all its dependant libraries?
If you use 'removepkg' then all the files installed by that package are removed, unless they are also used by some other package. This allows common libraries to be preserved.

Quote:
Has anyone considered creating a Slackware wiki to put all this information in a single central place?
http://slackwiki.com
 
Old 05-19-2012, 01:58 PM   #7
slakmagik
Senior Member
 
Registered: Feb 2003
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 4,113

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
Thanks for your feedback. The point of my question was Best Practices though. I understand I can do whatever the hell I want to do but all IT is more or less that way.
Welcome. Questions 2, 4, and 6 were about matters of fact, though, rather than best practices and questions 1, 3, and 5 have you asking what best practices are on subjects where the sync script, slackpkg, and sbopkg have default behaviors. We wouldn't have established those as defaults if they weren't at least not-bad-practices. If you have some specific reason to want to change the default behaviors of the programs, you can, but you should be safe letting the programs operate how they do. (I don't actually use alien's sync script but I'm sure its defaults are wisely set.) And all these things can be changed with a simple 'mv' command to a new location and a 'vi' of the config file(s) - none of this is set in stone or locked into an interdependent registry.

Quote:
PS: I can't seem to find anything even remotely comparable to the UbuntuGuide.org wiki out there for slackware. Has anyone considered creating a Slackware wiki to put all this information in a single central place? The Slackbook is a decent starting point and there's a tiny wiki here but again, nothing like the wikis you see for other distributions.
If you look at the top line of links in my sig, you'll find the slack book, faq, and wiki.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
Uninstalling (as I'm sure you know), is done with "removepkg packagename", as in "removepkg emacs". Slackware has a single file listing its installed packages (/var/log/packages). So if you forget what the last letter in "emacs" is (and I know this is a bad example) then you can still uninstall it with "grep emac /var/log/packages | xargs removepkg".
Even if that was the right command, it's probably not a best practice. I think you mean something like "find /var/log/packages/ -regex '.*emac.*' | xargs removepkg" (otherwise, without '-R' or a trailing '/*', your command will return nothing and, even then, you'll be trying to remove anything that contains the string 'emac' in its file (rather than filename) and generally failing because the output isn't in the correct form for removepkg). All that aside, I'd definitely run the first half of any such pipe by itself first, as you may not always realize what going to be matched. I'd hate to try to remove (another bad example) glib with (as an alternate to find) 'ls /var/log/packages/glib* | xargs removepkg'
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-19-2012, 02:26 PM   #8
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 15,364
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981
Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
So if you forget what the last letter in "emacs" is (and I know this is a bad example) then you can still uninstall it with "grep emac /var/log/packages | xargs removepkg".
I would recommend to rather use
Code:
slackpkg remove emac
in such a case, since slackpkg will show you a list of matches that you can choose from which packages to remove.
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 05-19-2012, 04:22 PM   #9
thund3rstruck
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: East Coast, USA
Distribution: Fedora 18, Slackware64 13.37, Windows 7/8
Posts: 346

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 38
Thanks again everyone! I'm extremely grateful for it. Its been a week or so in and I'm really, really enjoying Slackware. Other than not being able to print from my HP network printer, everything has gone rather smoothly. My only regret to this point is that I did a 'full installation' because I was worried about the bad reputation for slackware's package management so I ended up with a zillion programs on my machine that I'll never use. If I had known about slackpkg, slackbuilds.org, and alienBob then I would have just installed a base system and only installed the packages I actually wanted.

In any event, so far so good.

Thanks again everyone for being so helpful!
 
Old 05-19-2012, 05:08 PM   #10
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Gentoo
Posts: 15,364
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981Reputation: 3981
It is totally recommended to make a full installation when you are new to Slackware. Learn your basics first, then you can try to run slimmed down systems, if you need (or want). On modern desktop systems with harddisks in sizes of TBs a Slackware installation of about 6GB isn't that much, so I wouldn't consider saving space a high priority. Since Slackware does not run many services by default you are also not wasting other resources with that approach.
 
Old 05-19-2012, 05:18 PM   #11
sycamorex
LQ Veteran
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: London
Distribution: Slackware64-current
Posts: 5,524
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997Reputation: 997
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I would recommend to rather use
Code:
slackpkg remove emac
in such a case, since slackpkg will show you a list of matches that you can choose from which packages to remove.
I usually uninstall packages using pkgtool.
 
Old 05-19-2012, 06:16 PM   #12
slack_them_all
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Posts: 20

Rep: Reputation: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
My only regret to this point is that I did a 'full installation' because I was worried about the bad reputation for slackware's package management so I ended up with a zillion programs on my machine that I'll never use.
Hi,
Here is what I do when I install Slackware. I choose all the packages from the following series A, AP, D, K, L, N, X and select the one I want from XAP. I think this is a good "minimum" for a X workstation. With these, you are sure to have all needed libraries, essentials programs and the possibility to compile software. I don't install any from E, F, T, TCL, KDE, KDEI. Of course, you should adjust this list to your needs.
For being able to do that, you need to choose 'menu' or 'expert' as prompting mode during installation.
As you've been said, you cannot install only what you use, as Slackware packages manager doesn't provide dependencies resolution. If you want to use KDE, then you need the KDE serie and then it will not save you much space to try not to install all other packages. KDEI is definitely not needed unless you enjoy a different language every day!
In your case, if you look at the content of each serie, you can still easily remove unwanted software and find peace of mind :-)
When upgrade time comes, (next Slackware version) you'll have to adapt slightly the upgrade procedure (UPGRADE.TXT) otherwise you'll end up to install everything again.

Last edited by slack_them_all; 05-20-2012 at 03:55 AM. Reason: a few packages series were missing
 
Old 05-21-2012, 07:23 AM   #13
rinias
Member
 
Registered: May 2009
Distribution: Slackware64-14.0
Posts: 58

Rep: Reputation: 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
Other than not being able to print from my HP network printer, everything has gone rather smoothly.
Have you tried hplip? You'd need to add your user to the lp and sys groups, as root :

Code:
usermod -G lp,sys -a youruser
Then you can run hp-setup or hp-tray as you'd like and add the printer. I have my router set up to always give the printer the same IP, and I find it's easiest to enter that address in the Manual Discovery option, but it's not necessary.

Good luck.

PS - It's installed because you did a full install.
 
Old 05-21-2012, 08:06 AM   #14
thund3rstruck
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2005
Location: East Coast, USA
Distribution: Fedora 18, Slackware64 13.37, Windows 7/8
Posts: 346

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 38
Quote:
Originally Posted by rinias View Post
Have you tried hplip? You'd need to add your user to the lp and sys groups, as root :

Code:
usermod -G lp,sys -a youruser
Then you can run hp-setup or hp-tray as you'd like and add the printer. I have my router set up to always give the printer the same IP, and I find it's easiest to enter that address in the Manual Discovery option, but it's not necessary.

Good luck.

PS - It's installed because you did a full install.
I love you guys

I added myself to lp but not sys. I'm really busy at work today but I'm going to try this as soon as possible
 
Old 05-21-2012, 08:33 AM   #15
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 11,022
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364Reputation: 1364
Member response

Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by thund3rstruck View Post
<snip>

PS: I can't seem to find anything even remotely comparable to the UbuntuGuide.org wiki out there for slackware. Has anyone considered creating a Slackware wiki to put all this information in a single central place? The Slackbook is a decent starting point and there's a tiny wiki here but again, nothing like the wikis you see for other distributions.
Anything related to Slackware is a work in progress!

Since LQ Slackware forum is the official forum you will find helpful and resourceful members willing to help.

Look at the the links in my sig and you will find several good points of reference.

SlackwareŽ-Links is very resourceful and more than just SlackwareŽ-Links; Look at SlackwareŽ Basics to enhance your Slackware experience.

Alien Pastures is Alien_Bob's (Eric Hameleers) blog. Alien_Bob is a Slackware team member that provides excellent package resource and development. Alien_Bob provides this mirror & rsync:/taper.alienbase.nl/mirrors/.

Be sure to look at the stickies;
So you want to be a Slacker! What do I do next? & Slackware.com solutions for users.

The above links and others can be found at 'Slackware-Links'. More than just SlackwareŽ links!
 
  


Reply

Tags
sbopkg, slackpkg, slackware


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
package management javimd786 Linux - Newbie 1 01-02-2010 04:13 PM
Slackware Package Management Best Practices -{Jester}- Slackware 19 05-22-2008 12:46 AM
LXer: Simple Package management with Synaptic Package Manager LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 12-05-2006 06:33 PM
Using Package Archive style package management mugwump84 Linux From Scratch 3 08-25-2005 05:19 PM
software management - best practices? curmudgeon42 Linux - Software 1 06-03-2004 09:12 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:15 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration