LinuxQuestions.org
Register a domain and help support LQ
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 11-09-2012, 11:26 PM   #31
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.0
Posts: 3,476

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531

Anybody here have experience with this netbook?

Model: AO7250412

http://www.hhgregg.com/acer-aspire-o...item/AO7250412
 
Old 11-10-2012, 12:22 AM   #32
yuchankit
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2008
Distribution: Slackware 13.1 ,slackware-current
Posts: 143

Rep: Reputation: 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman View Post
Anybody here have experience with this netbook?

Model: AO7250412

http://www.hhgregg.com/acer-aspire-o...item/AO7250412
I had the AO722 which shares the same platform with that laptop(C60 APU and AMD 6290 GPU). ATI fixes the resume/suspend bug just recently(12.9 beta onwards I think). Aside from the newer chipset(mine only has USB 2.0 ports),smaller battery(mine is 6 cells),a less battery friendly SATA III SSD, I think everything is the same.

Talking about linux compatibility, this netbook is definitely awesome if you want to surf net,do some light programming and even watch HD videos with GPU acceleration. I got about 4.5 hours of battery life(basic wifi surfing,lowest brightness setting,XFCE running) out of my netbook(mind that mine comes with 6 cell battery instead of 4).

I would definitely recommend you to get the proprietary AMD driver rather than the open source radeon because of its GPU acceleration and better battery life. But again, if you don't trust AMD driver(they have been known for poor linux support compared to intel and nvidia), then I don't think this laptop is for you.

I apologize if I organize my observation in kind of untidy way, but I hope my observation is a helpful one :-)

EDIT : The price of that netbook in that website is a bit too expensive in my opinion. I got mine for sub $300. I think there's a newer model of this one which has Celeron CPU and intel GPU which is more linux friendly in my opinion.

Last edited by yuchankit; 11-10-2012 at 12:25 AM.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 07:11 AM   #33
zk1234
Member
 
Registered: Oct 2010
Location: Poland
Distribution: 4MLinux, Slackware, Slitaz, Mint
Posts: 114

Rep: Reputation: 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by yuchankit View Post
I had the AO722 which shares the same platform with that laptop(C60 APU and AMD 6290 GPU). ATI fixes the resume/suspend bug just recently(12.9 beta onwards I think). Aside from the newer chipset(mine only has USB 2.0 ports),smaller battery(mine is 6 cells),a less battery friendly SATA III SSD, I think everything is the same.

Talking about linux compatibility, this netbook is definitely awesome if you want to surf net,do some light programming and even watch HD videos with GPU acceleration. I got about 4.5 hours of battery life(basic wifi surfing,lowest brightness setting,XFCE running) out of my netbook(mind that mine comes with 6 cell battery instead of 4).

I would definitely recommend you to get the proprietary AMD driver rather than the open source radeon because of its GPU acceleration and better battery life. But again, if you don't trust AMD driver(they have been known for poor linux support compared to intel and nvidia), then I don't think this laptop is for you.

I apologize if I organize my observation in kind of untidy way, but I hope my observation is a helpful one :-)

EDIT : The price of that netbook in that website is a bit too expensive in my opinion. I got mine for sub $300. I think there's a newer model of this one which has Celeron CPU and intel GPU which is more linux friendly in my opinion.
I agree. I would list mainstream video cards in the following order:
1) Intel --> very well supported by free Linux drivers,
2) NVIDIA --> well supported by free Linux drivers, proprietary drivers should work too,
3) AMD --> most problematic (compared to Intel and NVIDIA).
Netbooks are not designed for playing the newest 3D games, and this is one more reason to use Intel graphics.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 07:19 AM   #34
H_TeXMeX_H
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269
I would list it a different way:

1) Nvidia = the best current support whether proprietary blob or FLOSS nouveau. EXCEPT for Optimus, even tho there is some support using bumblebee and nvidia promised to support it in the future.
2) the rest = crappy cards and crappy drivers.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 07:50 AM   #35
cascade9
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Brisneyland
Distribution: Debian, aptosid
Posts: 3,718

Rep: Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by zk1234 View Post
I agree. I would list mainstream video cards in the following order:
1) Intel --> very well supported by free Linux drivers,
2) NVIDIA --> well supported by free Linux drivers, proprietary drivers should work too,
3) AMD --> most problematic (compared to Intel and NVIDIA).
Netbooks are not designed for playing the newest 3D games, and this is one more reason to use Intel graphics.
Intel- is variable. Some of its video chips have good support, some O.K., and some have zero real support with linux (powerVR chips in particular). Lots of netbooks use intel atom chips, and the newest intel atoms (D2XXX) use powerVR chips. Be careful to avoid them if you want 3D desktops or even just 3D acceleration.

nVidia- optimus sucks and that is what you will find with most laptops and netbooks now with intel + nVidia setups.

AMD IMO runs better with the FOSS drivers than nVidia cards. Lots of people comaplain about the closed ATI/AMD drivers...even people that havent used ATI/AMD GPUs or IGPs for years.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 08:47 AM   #36
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: Slackware®
Posts: 11,044
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369
Member Response

Hi,

I have a Dell XPS with Optimus and use Bumblebee with no issues for Nvidia & Intel graphics. Intel has a good general graphics control but Optimus Nvidia provides a major change in graphics abilities. Only use Optimus when necessary for particular applications, great presentation for Firefox & videos. Notice the battery usage is greater with Optimus but the Laptop is Ac plugged most of the time. Just cycle the battery occasionally.

For Optimus using Bumblebeed requires some extensive setup but once done no major issues to date. My setup uses a cooler and LapDesk to keep the temps down since the Nvidia does use some power.

Cascade, I do not think Optimus 'sucks' but does require one to do additional work to get Optimus Nvidia to work with Gnu/Linux. Just tried 'optirun libreoffice' and things are normal with CPU loads still between 10-14% typical at 4%. I have not tweaked my plasmoid to include all cores at this point in time.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 11:28 AM   #37
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.0
Posts: 3,476

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531
Thanks yuchankit for the description. I became interested in the AO72x-xxxx series because of the larger keyboard and 11.6 inch screen. I have refrained from netbooks because of the small keyboards. All I want is a light weight machine for basic web surfing in the living room or traveling and for sharing home videos and photos when visiting family. I don't play computer games. I have no illusions that any netbook is a speed demon. As I mentioned in my original post, such a machine will not be my primary system.

I read several reviews of AO722-xxxx systems. Seems there are several varieties of the AO722-xxxx line. I concluded from the reviews that everything is Linux compatible although a few people had to work a tad to get things working. I also concluded from the reviews that although the proprietary AMD drivers historically have been problematic, that those using an AO722-xxxx device were not having problems.

The link I provided was because I first saw the system in a brick-and-mortar store of that chain store. I'm sure there are better prices.

How do most of you typically install Slackware on a netbook? Both the preinstalled Windows partition needs to be deleted or shrunk and there is no optical disk with a netbook.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 11:44 AM   #38
H_TeXMeX_H
Guru
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Location: $RANDOM
Distribution: slackware64
Posts: 12,928
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269Reputation: 1269
For a netbook I bought a USB DVD+RW drive and it fits along side it in the hard case I have. You can boot slackware from that and install it.

Surprisingly, the dual core Atom processor with hyperthreading in my netbook is quite fast. A kernel compile will take around 15 minutes. The only slow thing is the RAM because it is single-channel and the GPU interface because it is PCIe 1x Gen 1. It can't really play 1080p without audio stuttering, only 720p, which is fine with me. The screen is a bit small, but no smaller than a portable DVD player, and it has HDMI output. Encoding videos is very slow.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 12:21 PM   #39
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,970

Rep: Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848
Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman View Post
...
How do most of you typically install Slackware on a netbook? Both the preinstalled Windows partition needs to be deleted or shrunk and there is no optical disk with a netbook.
I have a subnotebook Thinkpad x100e 11.6'' an also without a CD/DVD-drive, I've used gparted on a USB-memory-stick in order to shrink the Windows-partition and afterwards put the usb-bootimage from the "usb-and-pxe-installers" directory of the Slackware-mirror onto the USB-memory-stick and installed Slackware from there. When I remember correctly I made a Network-install from an FTP-mirror. You could also rsync the packages from another Computer in your network and put it on a partition of the subnotebook and then select this partition as source during the installation.

Markus
 
Old 11-10-2012, 03:51 PM   #40
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.0
Posts: 3,476

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531
Having never used the usb-and-pxe-intallers, I had completely forgotten about them. Thanks. I suppose another option is one I've used before: pull the drive, insert temporarily on another computer, install Slackware, edit fstab, etc., and restore to the original computer. If I buy a netbook I'll definitely give the USB installer option a test.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 04:20 PM   #41
markush
Senior Member
 
Registered: Apr 2007
Location: Germany
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 3,970

Rep: Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848Reputation: 848
The only difference between the USB-installer and the install-DVD is, that the USB-installer comes without the packages, and booting is slower via USB than with the DVD (maybe this is different when one has USB-3.0, but then you would only need a USB-3.0 capable USB-memory-stick).

But as far as I know, it is possible to put the packages also on the USB-device, at least doesn't the usb-bootimage delete the whole USB-device, so one could create two partitions on it, one small for the bootimage and one large for the packages. Or one has to rebuild the isoimage with the packages. It would be nice, when once you have installed Slackware on the device, if you could post your exprience here (or at SlackDocs). As you know there are so many methods for a Slackware-installation and it is not anything documented very well.

Also installing with pxe seems to be quite simple http://docs.slackware.com/slackwarexe_install

Markus
 
Old 11-10-2012, 08:02 PM   #42
Woodsman
Senior Member
 
Registered: Oct 2005
Distribution: Slackware 14.0
Posts: 3,476

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531Reputation: 531
I maintain local Slackware repositories. I won't need an internet connection, just a network connection.

Should I buy a netbook, I'll try to remember to share my experience.
 
Old 11-10-2012, 09:01 PM   #43
catkin
LQ 5k Club
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: Tamil Nadu, India
Distribution: Servers: Debian Squeeze and Wheezy. Desktop: Slackware64 14.0. Netbook: Slackware 13.37
Posts: 8,528
Blog Entries: 27

Rep: Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176Reputation: 1176
Regards installing Slackware on a netbook without a CD or DVD drive, here's my log of installing Slackware 13.37 on a Samsung N150 via a UFD.

Following instructions at http://alien.slackbook.org/blog/inst...b-thumb-drive/

Checked the .iso file:
Code:
c@CW8:~/.../Slackware/Slackware 13.37/slackware-13.37-iso$ md5sum -c slackware-13.37-install-dvd.iso.md5
slackware-13.37-install-dvd.iso: OK
Mounted the DVD .iso:
Code:
root@CW8:~# mount -o loop '/home/c/d/Repository/Slackware/Slackware 13.37/slackware-13.37-iso/slackware-13.37-install-dvd.iso' /media/dvd
Found the script and checked its permissions:
Code:
root@CW8:~# ll /media/dvd/usb-and-pxe-installers/usbimg2disk.sh
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 16K Apr 17  2011 /media/dvd/usb-and-pxe-installers/usbimg2disk.sh
Plugged in the (8 GB) UFD, identified it as /dev/sdc (LABEL ant TYPE values probably came from having used it to install 13.1) and loaded it:
Code:
root@CW8:~# blkid
[snip]
/dev/loop0: LABEL="SlackDVD" TYPE="iso9660" 
/dev/sdc: LABEL="SlackDVD" TYPE="iso9660"
root@CW8:~# bash /media/dvd/usb-and-pxe-installers/usbimg2disk.sh \
	--format \
	--infile /media/dvd/usb-and-pxe-installers/usbboot.img \
	--logfile /tmp/usbimg2disk.sh.log \
	--outdev /dev/sdc \
 	--slackdir /media/dvd
[snip]
--- Available free space on the the USB drive is 7870428 KB
--- Required free space for installer: 31377 KB
--- Copying boot files to the USB drive...
--- Extracting Slackware initrd.img...
--- Modifying installer files...
--- Gzipping the initrd image again:
--- Copying Slackware package tree to the USB drive...
--- Cleaning up the staging area...
--- Making the USB drive '/dev/sdc' bootable...
For the actual installation ...

Inserted the prepared installation UFD.

Repeatedly pressed Esc during power up to get a boot device selection screen.

F2 to enter BIOS where set the UFD as the first boot device.

The procedure after booting from UFD was identical to when using a DVD.
 
Old 11-11-2012, 03:30 AM   #44
cascade9
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2011
Location: Brisneyland
Distribution: Debian, aptosid
Posts: 3,718

Rep: Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903Reputation: 903
Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
Cascade, I do not think Optimus 'sucks' but does require one to do additional work to get Optimus Nvidia to work with Gnu/Linux. Just tried 'optirun libreoffice' and things are normal with CPU loads still between 10-14% typical at 4%. I have not tweaked my plasmoid to include all cores at this point in time.
Hmmm, I should have said a bit more than just 'optimus sucks' then.

Its a pain to setup with no guarantee it will work with linux. When setup with linux, its far more fiddly than it is with windows where everything happens with no user input.

Techncially, it seems to be a huge amount of stuffing around to save very few watts.

Its the beginning of the end for nVidia GPUs in laptops as well. I predict that in two or three generations optimus setups will be much rarer than currently and will be mostly 'top end' nVidia GPUs only.

Last edited by cascade9; 11-11-2012 at 07:20 AM.
 
Old 11-11-2012, 07:14 AM   #45
onebuck
Moderator
 
Registered: Jan 2005
Location: Midwest USA, Central Illinois
Distribution: Slackware®
Posts: 11,044
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369Reputation: 1369
Member Response

Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by cascade9 View Post
Hmmm, I should ahev said a bit more than just 'optimus sucks' then.

Its a pain to setup with no guarantee it will work with linux. When setup with linux, its far more fiddly than it is with windows where everything happens with no user input.

Techncially, it seems to be a huge amount of stuffing around to save very few watts.

Its the beginning of the end for nVidia GPUs in laptops as well. I predict that in two or three generations optimus setups will be much rarer than currently and will be mostly 'top end' nVidia GPUs only.
Pain is a understatement!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slackware on a netbook? Unr3a164 Slackware 60 01-31-2011 03:33 AM
Suggestions on netbook for Ubuntu use? AMDPwred Linux - Laptop and Netbook 7 07-24-2010 06:52 AM
How would I install slackware 13.0 on a netbook? Yaakov22 Linux - Laptop and Netbook 2 11-02-2009 01:57 PM
Slackware 13 on a aspire one netbook faiscaheisler Slackware - Installation 18 09-21-2009 11:48 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:06 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration