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Old 01-08-2013, 06:42 PM   #1
trainee
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Managing Slackware - /tmp directory


My /tmp direcotry contains a lot of directory with strange name like lu6qsnb[a-z]... and files like virtuoso-*.ini

Can you tell me what are those files doing, why are they created, and is it safe to remove them?

Thanks in advance.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 06:58 PM   #2
allend
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The virtuoso-*.ini are created by virtuoso when running KDE, of which one will be relevant while the KDE session is running. Not sure about the lu* files.
They can all be safely deleted. Anything in /tmp is a temporary file that can be regenerated if required.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 07:45 PM   #3
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Thanks. I just delete all those and everything seems fine.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 09:37 PM   #4
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I use tmpwatch myself.
 
Old 01-08-2013, 10:28 PM   #5
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A lot of Slackers put the following line in /etc/fstab:

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       defaults         0   0
That mounts /tmp on a RAM drive, so that it's cleared every boot.
 
Old 01-10-2013, 11:54 AM   #6
Uzuki
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what is the diferences between
Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       defaults         0   0
and
Code:
tmpfs            /dev/shm         tmpfs       defaults         0   0
 
Old 01-10-2013, 02:22 PM   #7
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First first mounts /tmp on a RAM drive. The second mounts /dev/shm on a RAM drive. I have both lines in my fstab.
 
Old 04-30-2013, 01:43 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
A lot of Slackers put the following line in /etc/fstab:

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       defaults         0   0
Already present and I'm confident that I did not alter this file...
Maybe Pat really does know what's best for me.
 
Old 04-30-2013, 02:47 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Habitual View Post
Already present and I'm confident that I did not alter this file...
Maybe Pat really does know what's best for me.
That line isn't preset by the installer. Perhaps you are reading the /dev/shm line?
 
Old 04-30-2013, 03:55 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ruario View Post
That line isn't preset by the installer. Perhaps you are reading the /dev/shm line?
Waaaaaaay too many consoles open today...
You are correct, of course:
Code:
tmpfs            /dev/shm         tmpfs       defaults         0   0
 
Old 04-30-2013, 04:03 PM   #11
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@trainee: You might find this useful http://docs.slackware.com/howtos:gen...ree_your_space
 
Old 04-30-2013, 10:15 PM   #12
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
A lot of Slackers put the following line in /etc/fstab:

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       defaults         0   0
That mounts /tmp on a RAM drive, so that it's cleared every boot.
This.

And then you can make your web browser store its cache there...
 
Old 05-01-2013, 05:33 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dugan View Post
A lot of Slackers put the following line in /etc/fstab:

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       defaults         0   0
That mounts /tmp on a RAM drive, so that it's cleared every boot.
actuall, i do

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       size=4G,mode=777    0   0
ie. limiting the amount of memory and setting permissions
 
Old 05-01-2013, 06:46 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martinus2u View Post
actuall, i do

Code:
tmpfs            /tmp             tmpfs       size=4G,mode=777    0   0
ie. limiting the amount of memory and setting permissions
+1

Otherwise after a couple of months of uptime you start having issues with things that need to write in /tmp, and then you end up having to use tmpwatch in any case.
 
Old 05-01-2013, 07:19 AM   #15
ruario
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martinus2u View Post
limiting the amount of memory
It automatically limits to half the available memory in any case, even if you do not set it
 
  


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