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Old 03-20-2013, 01:43 PM   #1
vivanguarda
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Mail and Command Line


Good Afternoon!!

I am using a small network and I would like to know the exact moment when server is turns on and off. Then a command line "mail -s " is a initial idea. Unfortunately, I didn't receive a mail in my mailbox. Sendmail is installed, but this is my

nmapp localhost:

PORT STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open ssh
37/tcp open time
113/tcp open ident
631/tcp open ipp
5900/tcp open vnc
6881/tcp open bittorrent-tracker



How can I solve the problem?
 
Old 03-20-2013, 02:24 PM   #2
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivanguarda View Post
Good Afternoon!!
I am using a small network and I would like to know the exact moment when server is turns on and off. Then a command line "mail -s " is a initial idea. Unfortunately, I didn't receive a mail in my mailbox. Sendmail is installed, but this is my

nmapp localhost:
PORT STATE SERVICE
22/tcp open ssh
37/tcp open time
113/tcp open ident
631/tcp open ipp
5900/tcp open vnc
6881/tcp open bittorrent-tracker


How can I solve the problem?
  1. Do you see any mail services running on the ports you listed?? If not, that's a good hint that sendmail isn't running. So, configure/start it. And make sure your iptables/selinux allows email access.
  2. Having sendmail on your server is only PART of the equation...it needs to know where to send the message(s) after they get processed. Do you have an internal mail server now? Using Gmail/yahoo? Who/where is your email hosted with now? If you've got an existing mail server, then set up sendmail to use it as a smarthost (documentation is plentiful on how to do this), and start sendmail.
  3. This won't work if your server isn't shut down properly, and you'll only get an email when it comes back up.
After being a member here for five years, you should know about the LQ Search function...questions like this have been asked (and answered) here MANY times.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 03:37 PM   #3
vivanguarda
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
[LIST=1]

After being a member here for five years, you should know about the LQ Search function...questions like this have been asked (and answered) here MANY times.
Sorry, but sometimes I'm also scared about these years and in fact I don't understand anything about MTA!

I don't have sendmail, postfix nor mutt... Anything running in this server.

# /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail start
bash: /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail: Permission denied

And this is my /var/log/maillog
Mar 15 01:06:22 maq1 sendmail[2446]: gethostbyaddr(192.168.0.2) failed: 1
Mar 15 01:08:45 maq1 sendmail[2455]: r2F48j0t002455: from=root, size=219, class=0, nrcpts=1,
msgid=<201303150408.r2F48j0t002455@maq1>, relay=root@localhost
Mar 15 01:08:45 maq1 sendmail[2455]: r2F48j0t002455: to=vivanguarda2@ig.com.br, ctladdr=root
(0/0), delay=00:00:00, xdelay=00:00:00, mailer=relay, pri=30219, relay=[127.0.0.1] [127.0.0.1
], dsn=4.0.0, stat=Deferred: Connection refused by [127.0.0.1


I am reading a lot of LQ material but it's a difficult compreension.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 04:00 PM   #4
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vivanguarda View Post
Sorry, but sometimes I'm also scared about these years and in fact I don't understand anything about MTA!
I don't have sendmail, postfix nor mutt... Anything running in this server.
Well, if you want to send mail, you need a mail server. If it's not running, you shouldn't be surprised that you cant'.
Quote:
# /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail start
bash: /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail: Permission denied
Right...because that's a config file. Have you tried "/etc/init.d/sendmail start"?
Quote:
And this is my /var/log/maillog
Mar 15 01:06:22 maq1 sendmail[2446]: gethostbyaddr(192.168.0.2) failed: 1
Mar 15 01:08:45 maq1 sendmail[2455]: r2F48j0t002455: from=root, size=219, class=0, nrcpts=1,
msgid=<201303150408.r2F48j0t002455@maq1>, relay=root@localhost
Mar 15 01:08:45 maq1 sendmail[2455]: r2F48j0t002455: to=vivanguarda2@ig.com.br, ctladdr=root
(0/0), delay=00:00:00, xdelay=00:00:00, mailer=relay, pri=30219, relay=[127.0.0.1] [127.0.0.1
], dsn=4.0.0, stat=Deferred: Connection refused by [127.0.0.1[/I]

I am reading a lot of LQ material but it's a difficult compreension.
...which is back to "sendmail isn't running, so you can't send mail". The logs are immaterial at this point. And AGAIN:
  • What version/distro of Linux are you using?
  • What are you using right now for email?
  • Where is that email server? (yours or an outside source like Gmail?)
  • Have you actually CONFIGURED sendmail? If you don't, then starting it will be pointless.
Until you answer questions, no one will be able to help.
 
Old 03-20-2013, 04:36 PM   #5
Mike_M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Well, if you want to send mail, you need a mail server.
That is untrue. To send mail you need a mail client. It may be an MUA or an MTA acting as that client, but it is not necessary to be running an MTA in order to send mail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne
Quote:
Originally Posted by vivanguarda
# /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail start
bash: /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail: Permission denied
Right...because that's a config file.
No it isn't, it is an init script. The permission denied message is almost certainly do to the script not being executable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne
Have you tried "/etc/init.d/sendmail start"?
That won't do much good on Slackware.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne
...which is back to "sendmail isn't running, so you can't send mail". The logs are immaterial at this point. And AGAIN:
  • What version/distro of Linux are you using?
  • What are you using right now for email?
  • Where is that email server? (yours or an outside source like Gmail?)
  • Have you actually CONFIGURED sendmail? If you don't, then starting it will be pointless.
Until you answer questions, no one will be able to help.
This is the Slackware forum, so it should be a safe bet the OP is running Slackware. If not then my apologies for jumping in.

I agree with you that there really isn't enough information to properly assist the OP. However, providing misinformation isn't going to help, either. A clearer description of the actual problem would be nice. Running Sendmail in this case is likely to be overkill, unless the OP is trying to deliver mail only to and from the LAN. Given the one log line that lists a "to" address in the "ig.com.br" domain it seems the OP is trying to send mail outside the LAN.
 
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:14 PM   #6
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_M View Post
That is untrue. To send mail you need a mail client. It may be an MUA or an MTA acting as that client, but it is not necessary to be running an MTA in order to send mail.
Right...and unless sendmail/postfix is running (an MTA), with a smarthost defined, the mail will sit there, no matter WHAT client is used, unless the OP sets up MX records, etc., or uses mailx, which they aren't per their first post.
Quote:
No it isn't, it is an init script. The permission denied message is almost certainly do to the script not being executable.
Good catch. However, it seems odd that an init script isn't executable.
Quote:
That won't do much good on Slackware.
...which is only true if the OP is using Slackware, which is an unknown at this point
Quote:
This is the Slackware forum, so it should be a safe bet the OP is running Slackware. If not then my apologies for jumping in.

I agree with you that there really isn't enough information to properly assist the OP. However, providing misinformation isn't going to help, either. A clearer description of the actual problem would be nice. Running Sendmail in this case is likely to be overkill, unless the OP is trying to deliver mail only to and from the LAN. Given the one log line that lists a "to" address in the "ig.com.br" domain it seems the OP is trying to send mail outside the LAN.
Right...back to step one: start the mail service, and define a smarthost which will handle the mail/addressing/etc for them, which is NOT 'misinformation'. And even if a smart host is defined in the sendmail config, unless its started, it won't handle mail and apply the smarthost rule and forward it along...and it's back to sitting there.

Last edited by TB0ne; 03-20-2013 at 05:17 PM.
 
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Old 03-20-2013, 05:39 PM   #7
Woodsman
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I use a system similar to what you describe.

I have sendmail installed on all systems and I start the service on all systems (chmod +x /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail)

In various scripts I use mail one-liners to notify me of various events. For immediate notifications I use rwall and the KDE notification system (KDE Write daemon) to notify me of various events.

I start rwalld in my rc.local script:

Code:
# Run remote wall (write all) daemon.
if [ -z "`ps ax | grep rwalld | grep -v grep`" ]; then
  if [ -x /usr/sbin/rpc.rwalld ]; then
    # Don't run on systems with less than 32MB of RAM?
    #if [ "`free -o | grep Mem | awk '{print $2}'`" -gt "32768" ]; then
      echo "Starting the rwall daemon." | $LOGGER
      /usr/sbin/rpc.rwalld
    #fi
  fi
fi
if [ "$BOXNAME" != "$NFS_SERVER" ] && [ -n "`ps ax | grep rwalld | grep -v grep`" ]; then
  ping -c1 -W1 $NFS_SERVER &>/dev/null
  if [ "$?" = "0" ] && [ -n "`ps ax | grep rwalld | grep -v grep`" ]; then
    echo "$BOXNAME is online." | rwall $NFS_SERVER 2>/dev/null
  fi
fi
On my small home network, $BOXNAME=`uname -n` and $NFS_SERVER is defined as my primary office system, which is on most of the day. I use the hostnames of each system, as defined in /etc/HOSTNAME and /etc/hosts.

I do something similar in my rc.shutdown script to provide a notifications about shutting down. In my rc.shutdown script I do this:

Code:
RL="`/sbin/runlevel | awk '{print $2}'`"
...
if [ -n "`ps ax | grep rwalld | grep -v grep`" ]; then
  # Provide a notification message.
  if [ "$BOXNAME" != "$NFS_SERVER" ]; then
    ping -c1 -W1 $NFS_SERVER &>/dev/null
    if [ "$?" = "0" ]; then
      if [ "$RL" = "0" ]; then
        echo "`uname -n` is powering down." | rwall $NFS_SERVER 2>/dev/null
      elif [ "$RL" = "6" ]; then
        echo "`uname -n` is rebooting." | rwall $NFS_SERVER 2>/dev/null
      fi
    fi
  fi
fi
If the systems you are monitoring are remote, then the mail notifications probably are just as good as rwall. In my various scripts I do something like this:

echo "This is the message I want to send" | mail -s "Important Message" root@localhost

I send all of the mails to root@localhost, but few people login to see mails to root, therefore mail forwarding is helpful.

In /etc/mail/aliases I add something like this:

# Who gets root's mail.
root: normaluser@$NFS_SERVER

Where normaluser is the name of my normal user account and $NFS_SERVER is the hostname of the system where I normally work, same as above.

After editing /etc/mail/aliases I run the newaliases command, which updates /etc/mail/aliases.db with the changes made in /etc/mail/aliases.

Mail notifications depend upon the time delay set in /etc/rc.d/rc.sendmail. I modified the script to -q10m, which means every 10 minutes rather than the default 25 minutes.

For immediate notification, the rwall method is better, but with graphical desktops a way is needed to intercept the rwall messages. KDE provides a good way to do that with the KDE Write daemon. I don't know how other desktops or window managers support that type of messaging. When in a console (not xterm but outside of X), the rwall messages will interrupt the console session.

If you keep your email client running all the time, then the mail method probably is sufficient as long as the time delay is acceptable.
 
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Old 03-20-2013, 06:36 PM   #8
Mike_M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Right...and unless sendmail/postfix is running (an MTA), with a smarthost defined, the mail will sit there, no matter WHAT client is used, unless the OP sets up MX records, etc., or uses mailx, which they aren't per their first post.
People send mail from their local machines/networks to remote addresses all the time without the need of running an MTA. One of the provided log snippets indicates the OP is trying to send the messages in question to an address in the ig.com.br domain, which is hosted by Google Apps. There is no need for an MTA to be running on the OP's local machine or network in order to send email to that domain.

A simpler approach may be to use an SMTP client like msmtp. It is easy to configure and is compatible with the sendmail command line options. The OP can set it up to either relay through their ISP's mail server or deliver the mail directly. Create a symlink to /usr/sbin/sendmail and it will work with command line tools such as mail(1) that expect the existence of a sendmail binary.
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 10:14 AM   #9
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_M View Post
People send mail from their local machines/networks to remote addresses all the time without the need of running an MTA. One of the provided log snippets indicates the OP is trying to send the messages in question to an address in the ig.com.br domain, which is hosted by Google Apps. There is no need for an MTA to be running on the OP's local machine or network in order to send email to that domain.
Sorry, no. You do not have to configure ALL the parts of sendmail/postfix/whatever, but if you don't have something to send the mail along, it will not go anywhere.
http://www.feep.net/sendmail/tutoria...A-MTA-MDA.html
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sendmail tutorial
Mail Transfer Agent (MTA) The MTA basically acts as a "mail router". It accepts a message passed to it by either an MUA or another MTA, decides based upon the message header which delivery method it should use, and then passes the message to the appropriate MDA for that delivery method.
Yes, the OP is trying to send mail to Google...fine. Doesn't matter what domain the user is sending to, but if the user has an email message on their local system....what, exactly, is going to push that message out, if there is no system to handle SMTP running?? Again, all the OP has to do is configure a smart host to push any mail on their local system out to their mail-handling system. That's it. Define the DS parameter in the sendmail.cf file, and start sendmail. Otherwise, the mail will NOT have anywhere to go....nothing will be handling SMTP, doing address resolution, etc. It will just sit there. That's like saying "As long as you have an SSH client, there's no need to run a server"....if you want to use ANY protocol, you need a service to handle it, period.
Quote:
A simpler approach may be to use an SMTP client like msmtp. It is easy to configure and is compatible with the sendmail command line options. The OP can set it up to either relay through their ISP's mail server or deliver the mail directly. Create a symlink to /usr/sbin/sendmail and it will work with command line tools such as mail(1) that expect the existence of a sendmail binary.
Right...which is what I've been saying since the first post...they need to set up a RELAY. That's it. The OP can also use mailx, since you can then specify the next relay server in its config without needing to configure the MTA for a smart host...but AGAIN, you still need to tell it to use the smarthost further upstream. Mailx acts as a very stripped down MTA, which is why it can run stand alone.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 02:29 PM   #10
Mike_M
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Sorry, no. You do not have to configure ALL the parts of sendmail/postfix/whatever, but if you don't have something to send the mail along, it will not go anywhere.
http://www.feep.net/sendmail/tutoria...A-MTA-MDA.html

Yes, the OP is trying to send mail to Google...fine. Doesn't matter what domain the user is sending to, but if the user has an email message on their local system....what, exactly, is going to push that message out, if there is no system to handle SMTP running??
That's what a mail client is for, as I've stated multiple times in this thread. End users do not have to have any sort of daemon running in order to send mail. That's what their client (MUA) does. You seem to agree with this, but you keep telling me I'm wrong.

Quote:
Again, all the OP has to do is configure a smart host to push any mail on their local system out to their mail-handling system. That's it. Define the DS parameter in the sendmail.cf file, and start sendmail. Otherwise, the mail will NOT have anywhere to go....nothing will be handling SMTP, doing address resolution, etc. It will just sit there.
Configuring and running Sendmail (or another MTA) is one way to handle this, but it is NOT required. Keep insisting it is doesn't make it true.

Quote:
That's like saying "As long as you have an SSH client, there's no need to run a server"....if you want to use ANY protocol, you need a service to handle it, period.
Yes, there needs to be an MTA somewhere along the path in order to handle mail delivery. However, there is absolutely no need for an end user to run one on their local network in order to send email to other people. End users typically use an MUA (mail client). Whether that is a command line tool such as mailx or msmtp, or a full fledged client such as Mutt, Thunderbird, or Evolution, etc., does not matter. They don't need to be running an MTA to send their mail.



Quote:
Right...which is what I've been saying since the first post...they need to set up a RELAY. That's it.
It seems to me that you've been fairly insistent that the OP needs to be running an MTA in order deliver mail.

Quote:
The OP can also use mailx, since you can then specify the next relay server in its config without needing to configure the MTA for a smart host...but AGAIN, you still need to tell it to use the smarthost further upstream. Mailx acts as a very stripped down MTA, which is why it can run stand alone.
Mailx is a mail client. It acts like other mail clients that don't rely on the presence of a sendmail command line binary. It has the ability to communicate directly with SMTP servers in order to deliver mail.

Anyhow, this back-and-forth isn't solving anything.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 03:17 PM   #11
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_M View Post
That's what a mail client is for, as I've stated multiple times in this thread. End users do not have to have any sort of daemon running in order to send mail. That's what their client (MUA) does. You seem to agree with this, but you keep telling me I'm wrong.
Nope, don't agree with it, never have. The MUA is a client only...it talks to the SERVER behind it. Again, from the Sendmail tutorial
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sendmail Tutorial
Mail User Agent (MUA) The MUA is the program which the user uses to read and send e-mail. It reads incoming messages that have been delivered to the user's mailbox, and passes outgoing messages to an MTA for sending.
Please read the part in bold.
Quote:
Configuring and running Sendmail (or another MTA) is one way to handle this, but it is NOT required. Keep insisting it is doesn't make it true.
I never insisted it was the only way, and have said before that there are options (like mailx), that have stripped-down MTA's built in. To send mail to another mail server, you need something to handle that protocol, period. Unless you are running something that transfers the mail (an MTA) to another server, the mail will STILL never go anywhere.
Quote:
Yes, there needs to be an MTA somewhere along the path in order to handle mail delivery. However, there is absolutely no need for an end user to run one on their local network in order to send email to other people. End users typically use an MUA (mail client).
Right...the part you're ignoring is that the MUA has to have a server to talk to. These are the details you enter into your client (user/password/server name/etc), so the MUA can download/read messages, and push new messages up to be sent. The thing the MUA talks to IS AN MTA.
Quote:
Whether that is a command line tool such as mailx or msmtp, or a full fledged client such as Mutt, Thunderbird, or Evolution, etc., does not matter. They don't need to be running an MTA to send their mail.
They don't, if their client is already talking to another MTA. In this case, they're not. Again, mailx or msmtp have built-in capabilities to talk to talk to an MTA further upstream, like Thunderbird and the like.
Quote:
It seems to me that you've been fairly insistent that the OP needs to be running an MTA in order deliver mail.
Yep...because they DO need MTA capabilities to send mail to another mail-host. AGAIN...they do NOT need to set up MX records, DNS entries, etc....all they need to define is the smarthost directive, and point it to whatever they're using for email now. That's it. Then, the standard mail utility will work, since any mail sent on that system will not be dealt with on that system but be relayed to the smarthost...that's all.
Quote:
Mailx is a mail client. It acts like other mail clients that don't rely on the presence of a sendmail command line binary. It has the ability to communicate directly with SMTP servers in order to deliver mail
Again, mailx is a mail client...with MTA capabilities built in. It is NOT just an MUA, and if the OP tries to use it like you're suggesting, they'll just have to set up the MTA portion of mailx to use the mail server further upstream, just like they would have to set up sendmail or postfix. MUA's talk to MTA's...that's how mail systems work. Saying you don't need an MTA because you have an MUA is nonsense...that is much like saying you can send SNMP traps, when you don't have the SNMP daemon running; after all, you've got the SNMP client, right? The remote SNMP server is waiting for a connection, but since you're not sending anything over that protocol, nothing will leave your system. You have to define the next hop, somewhere and somehow.

Whether you do it through the built-in MTA capabilities of mailx or via a 'real' MTA is irrelevant; you have to do it. Woodman has essentially said the same thing.
Quote:
Anyhow, this back-and-forth isn't solving anything.
Nope. No matter what, the OP has to define a route to the next mail server, despite what you're saying.

Last edited by TB0ne; 03-21-2013 at 03:19 PM.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 04:40 PM   #12
Mike_M
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When you make statements like the following:

Quote:
Whether you do it through the built-in MTA capabilities of mailx or via a 'real' MTA is irrelevant; you have to do it.
Quote:
and have said before that there are options (like mailx), that have stripped-down MTA's built in
Quote:
Yep...because they DO need MTA capabilities to send mail to another mail-host
Quote:
Unless you are running something that transfers the mail (an MTA) to another server, the mail will STILL never go anywhere.
it indicates you don't fully understand what you're talking about. A mail client is NOT an MTA (stripped down or otherwise). You seem to be redefining terminology to fit your argument. End users do NOT need to run an MTA to send mail to other people.

Quote:
Right...the part you're ignoring is that the MUA has to have a server to talk to
No kidding. I never ignored that part. What I have said is that users don't have to run their own server.

Quote:
Saying you don't need an MTA because you have an MUA is nonsense
At no point did I say that. Ever. What I've been saying is that an end user doesn't need to run their own MTA. That statement is true. Your rebuttal seems to be that a tool like mailx is somehow an MTA, which it is not.

Your posts thus far indicate you possess a vague understanding of how email works. While you may know more than a typical end user you may want to reconsider attempting to lecture others on the subject.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 05:16 PM   #13
TB0ne
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike_M View Post
When you make statements like the following:

it indicates you don't fully understand what you're talking about. A mail client is NOT an MTA (stripped down or otherwise). You seem to be redefining terminology to fit your argument. End users do NOT need to run an MTA to send mail to other people.
Sorry, it only indicates that you're not paying attention to what's been said.

A true MUA is is not an MTA. Mailx and msmtp have MTA functions built into them. End users do not: the OP is not an end-user, and has a SERVER that wants to send email. Sending email means having MTA capabilities SOMEWHERE...either built into a program or stand alone makes no difference. I have not redefined anything, but you truly are missing the point.
Quote:
At no point did I say that. Ever. What I've been saying is that an end user doesn't need to run their own MTA. That statement is true. Your rebuttal seems to be that a tool like mailx is somehow an MTA, which it is not.
Nope...again, you are ignoring things. One more time: mailx has MTA capabilities built into it. It always has. Read the man page:
http://linux.die.net/man/1/mailx

It is a client, with extended features. The part of this that you're missing, is that mailx can DIRECTLY send to an SMTP server, which bypasses the need to configure SOMETHING on the local server, telling SMTP where to go. Again, unless the local system has SOME WAY of knowing where to send SMTP messages, they'll sit on the local system. Mailx (when configured to do so), acts as the SMTP server, authenticates to the upstream host, and sends the message...acting like an MTA. Otherwise, it acts as a standard client. Standard clients
Quote:
Your posts thus far indicate you possess a vague understanding of how email works. While you may know more than a typical end user you may want to reconsider attempting to lecture others on the subject.
And yet you still, have not, provided ANY solutions, but rather seem bent on arguing, despite being sent to a sendmail tutorial, which clearly states that you are incorrect. One site I administer has over a dozen sendmail servers, with over 10,000 clients, so yes, I do know what I'm talking about, and can prove it, because I've done it. As of yet, you'd not even offered any solutions of your own, and can't seem to tell the difference between an MTA and an MUA. The scenario you describe would be like having one walkie-talkie. Not much good unless there's something on the other end to communicate with, on the same channel, is it? A mail client without a mail server is just as useless.

Need more? Google can provide it:
http://superuser.com/questions/13746...ct-to-the-targ
http://linux-com.blogspot.com/2011/0...and-mailx.html

Putting in "linux send email to external domain" provides over 1.2 million hits. Please read a few...find ANY that say you don't need SMTP to send emails between servers. Just on that first page most of the references go to "relay host" or "smart host"....which is what's been suggested all along.

If you are so sure of your position, then please, post the steps that will duplicate what you say you can do. Post a mail solution that doesn't require SMTP...I'm sure we'll all be grateful.
 
Old 03-21-2013, 05:48 PM   #14
Mike_M
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Quote:
Post a mail solution that doesn't require SMTP
Why on earth would I do that, when I've never stated such a thing?

Your repeated posting of misinformation won't make what you've said true. Your repeated misstating of what I've said won't make what I've said any less true. You have a fundamental misunderstanding of the components and protocols that make up the foundation of email. I do not. Your responses to me make several assertions of statements that I've made, with no basis in reality. Further responses to you are pointless. This thread has gone far enough off the rails, so unless the OP comes back with a clearer statement of their problem I am through with it.
 
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:50 PM   #15
Richard Cranium
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Registered: Apr 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TB0ne View Post
Mailx (when configured to do so), acts as the SMTP server, authenticates to the upstream host, and sends the message...acting like an MTA.
Mailx acts as an SMTP server?

You should stop digging.
 
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