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Old 10-12-2006, 05:30 AM   #1
Andriy
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Talking linux home networking guide help


I am looking for a Slackware based linux home networking guide howto over the net. Unfortunately most sites are always either Redhat or Fedora. I want one the Slack way for a change. Can anyone point me to a good howto site? Thank you very much
 
Old 10-12-2006, 07:00 AM   #2
Samoth
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Unfortunately there isn't much on the subject. I would particularily like one explaining the network boot sequence topic. For Netfilter, it should be pretty much the same.

<<Samoth>>
 
Old 10-12-2006, 07:02 AM   #3
Andriy
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by Samoth
Unfortunately there isn't much on the subject. I would particularily like one explaining the network boot sequence topic. For Netfilter, it should be pretty much the same.

<<Samoth>>
Yeah, I pretty much agree on you on that one. I wonder if others have thought on this.
 
Old 10-27-2006, 05:29 PM   #4
Samoth
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I am sure many have, it is such a pain to do anything network-related in slack.
 
Old 10-27-2006, 05:47 PM   #5
hrp2171
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Yeah, it would be really nice for 2 or more computers, running the same distribution, to just network each other ala Windows workgroup setting. I understand that something needs to be shared but even in Windows when nothing is shared, one can still see other computers on the network. Of course, if some form of simple networking is ever included in Linux, it has to be well implemented and with security in mind. Also it should not use samba or nfs to do it. Though I think a minimal samba setup already included with the distribution would be nice, too. Nothing grand, maybe a read-only directory or something.
 
Old 10-27-2006, 07:59 PM   #6
dcdbutler
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How about the slackware book

or linuxhomenetworking.com - it's loosely based on fedora, but is actually fairly generic and easy to understand.

Cheers
 
Old 10-27-2006, 08:20 PM   #7
gbonvehi
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It's already there, /etc/samba/smb.conf-sample.
I don't think it's hard to do networking with Slackware, you just have to know how the network works
ifconfig works on all distributions, loading modules is needed not just for networking, etc...
 
Old 10-28-2006, 02:03 AM   #8
acummings
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sftp is easy.

It works right out of the box on Slackware.

sftp uses the ssh

There's nothing to set up. Just use it.

(unless you disabled it during install) the ssh is on by default in Slackware.

google/linux for sftp to see some examples of command line, how to log onto another box on lan, and how to transfer files.

Or, if GUI is your favor, then gftp which can run from the KDE desktop. In gftp over near the upper right, choose ssh2 as the protocol. Then log on to another Linux 'puter on your lan. It's fun. It's easy. I'd wished that I'd discovered of it sooner than what I did. Transfer some files. It's on by default in Slackware 11 KDE desktop. Once again, on by default and no setup needed.

See how cool it is that Linux is so secure in its networking.

(Win, not Linux)Those rattlely netbios probing advertising Windows here I am, come and get me thing a ma bobs (end of Win).

BTW my firewall was too secure, so I had to open up for ssh. It's likely that you won't have this prob. but I thought I'd mention it.

Other ways:

NFS (Network File System) has a bit of a learning curve to it and is not turned on by default (likely due to security concerns).

For heterogenous (Linux and Windows) Samba works very nicely. Get a working Samba config and you've got it.

If you need more, such as how to configure interface, etc. then I've missed the mark.

--
Alan.
 
Old 10-28-2006, 10:03 AM   #9
kevmccor
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My 2 cents is keep it simple and focus on what you need. You may easily be confused by all the possibilities. There is no way to achieve a "point and click" network that is suited to you and secure. If its not secure, its not worth having. Much of the setup time is just learning about networking in general.

For Slackware, I would suggest you start with:
/etc/rc.d/rc.inet1.conf
/etc/dnsmasq.conf
/etc/exports (nfs - http://www.tldp.org/LDP/nag2/index.html IMO the best)
If you use a modem: http://freshmeat.net/projects/dwun/
(a relatively simple dialer)
/etc/ppp/
Use the simplest firewall script you find that masquerades and blocks incoming connections: http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/Lin...rkGateway.html

Keep track of what you do, so your system can be modified or adapted. In my experience, once the network is set up it works without attention. So I have forgotten what I did. After you are started with the setup, you will probably have specific questions, which you can ask here.

Good luck
 
Old 10-30-2006, 03:39 PM   #10
hrp2171
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Yes, I know an example smb.conf is already there. What Linux needs now is an easy way for newcomers to network their home computers. All distributions should force the installer to give root a password or like other distributions, use 'su' or 'sudo'. That's the first security measure. Then ask the installer if a basic read-only share should be created. If 'yes' then the setup process enables samba, walks the user through creating a non-root user with a password, etc. Now the installer does not have to login as root all the time, can just su* when needed and a basic network share is available.

A few security concerns are taken care of during the above process:

1. root will not have blank password
2. an everyday user account plus password is created(with sudo access of course)
3. the samba share is secured because is read-only to share files between computers

It's like except for Internet access, every Linux computer in the same office is an island. Someone has to manually setup samba or nfs or ftp or whatever to start sharing files and what-not over the network. From a newcomer stand point, he/she just wants to be able to use the OS the way they were used to before switching to Linux.

Oh nice I can ping that computer across the house. That's it. Where's the rest of the network services besides getting an IP address and being able to ping a computer across the room? Linux might be "desktop ready" when there's just one computer in the home. However, a few more things need to happen out-of-the-box for homes with more than one computer.
 
Old 11-01-2006, 09:34 AM   #11
Andriy
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Thank you for the wonderful shares. I'm looking forward to seeing something more Slack specific. Keep em coming.
 
Old 11-02-2006, 01:08 AM   #12
Old_Fogie
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Honestly, for me Alien Bob's wiki proves to be the best for me as a home user:

http://alien.slackbook.org/dokuwiki/...s_on_slackware

The only thing, and maybe Alien Bob will see this and comment is: in my /var/log/messages it states that rc.statd is running as root and should be chowned to a different user. All guides I have read do NOT address this very old (3 years or so) exploit that the TOrn worm would attack but we are still notified about in our log files. I made a post here on the forums but never got a reply to it. I haven't had a chance to chown it to a normal user and see what happens.

Some other light reading:

http://nfs.sourceforge.net/nfs-howto/ar01s03.html

And I like this one too:
http://www.howtoforge.com/nfs_ssh_tunneling

this one's ok too:
http://home.nyc.rr.com/computertaijutsu/samba.html
 
  


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