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Old 12-10-2009, 04:29 AM   #1
grete
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kernel image load time...


...has increased big time after changing from slackware to
slackware64, even though this new box is way faster.
Takes a lot of time. Not the whole booting, just that part
with the image "loading............................................
..............................."

This is no biggie for me, just curious.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 04:40 AM   #2
~sHyLoCk~
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Use compact in lilo. You can see my sig as I wrote down how I minimized my slack boot time.

Regards
 
Old 12-10-2009, 04:59 AM   #3
grete
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Thank you.
I had that "compact" in the lilo.conf for my old box.
Just overlooked.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 05:44 AM   #4
H_TeXMeX_H
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Also, I would use the generic kernel + initrd, not the default huge kernel.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 05:45 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
Also, I would use the generic kernel + initrd, not the default huge kernel.
As per my signature, I would take secret option number 3 - build a slimline generic kernel with no initrd.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 06:00 AM   #6
grete
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zordrak View Post
As per my signature, I would take secret option number 3 - build a slimline generic kernel with no initrd.
exactly. stock kernel as backup.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 06:25 AM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zordrak View Post
As per my signature, I would take secret option number 3 - build a slimline generic kernel with no initrd.
Well, that's what I do, but I can't say that this is what everyone would want to do.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 07:21 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

I would definitely use the 'generic' kernel over the installer 'huge' kernel for every day use;

Quote:
excerpt form 'CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT';

Use one of the provided generic kernels for daily use. Do not report
bugs until/unless you have reproduced them using one of the stock
generic kernels. You will need to create an initrd in order to boot
the generic kernels - see /boot/README.initrd for instructions.
The huge kernels are primarily intended as "installer" and "emergency"
kernels in case you forget to make an initrd. For most systems, you
should use the generic SMP kernel if it will run, even if your system is
not SMP-capable. Some newer hardware needs the local APIC enabled in the
SMP kernel, and theoretically there should not be a performance penalty
with using the SMP-capable kernel on a uniprocessor machine, as the SMP
kernel tests for this and makes necessary adjustments. Furthermore, the
kernel sources shipped with Slackware are configured for SMP usage, so you
won't have to modify those to build external modules (such as NVidia or
ATI proprietary drivers) if you use the SMP kernel.
The creation of a 'initrd' and modifying your '/etc/lilo.conf' is a lot easier than compiling a custom kernel for someone who is not familiar with the compile process plus the kernel is portable. A custom compile may be necessary for specific hardware. The new user should read '/boot/README.initrd' on how to create a 'initrd' and be sure to follow the '/etc/lilo.conf' inclusion within the README.

You are not going to see any performance gains by a custom compilation of the kernel for a boot load time. That is unless you are measuring time in milli-seconds for the boot to final prompt. Your hardware settling times are going to be inherent to the particular hardware subsystems. These times are going to be different between systems. Shrinking the kernel size will just save you a minimal storage of the kernel image size. If the kernel init for the hardware is the delay factor then that area should be addressed but still the inline verses a KLM is still latency due to your hardware. If the storage system is a typical rotating disk then one should look at a SSD or even a DRAM based RAMDISK ($$) for storage media for system loads. Then the system load times would be a lot faster when accessing the media.

I do like where the kernel community is going with the fashion of customizing the way one can configure the kernel via;

Quote:
excerpt from 'Linux 2 6 32';

1.8. Easy local kernel configuration

Most people uses the kernel shipped by distros - and that's good. But some people like to compile their own kernels from kernel.org, or maybe they like following the Linux development and want to try it. Configuring your own kernel, however, has become a very difficult and tedious task - there're too many options, and some times userspace software will stop working if you don't enable some key option. You can use a standard distro .config file, but it takes too much time to compile all the options it enables.

To make the process of configuration easier, a new build target has been added: make localmodconfig. It runs "lsmod" to find all the modules loaded on the current running system. It will read all the Makefiles to map which CONFIG enables a module. It will read the Kconfig files to find the dependencies and selects that may be needed to support a CONFIG. Finally, it reads the .config file and removes any module "=m" that is not needed to enable the currently loaded modules. With this tool, you can strip a distro .config of all the unuseful drivers that are not needed in our machine, and it will take much less time to build the kernel. There's an additional "make localyesconfig" target, in case you don't want to use modules and/or initrds.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 07:26 AM   #9
zordrak
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The problem with the generic kernel is the amount of cruft that remains. Once you have your working custom kernel, based on the generic kernel, you are free to set about removing any part of it that looks at you funny until you end up with something that doesn't boot.. and then back up a step.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 08:12 AM   #10
kjhambrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zordrak View Post
The problem with the generic kernel is the amount of cruft that remains. Once you have your working custom kernel, based on the generic kernel, you are free to set about removing any part of it that looks at you funny until you end up with something that doesn't boot.. and then back up a step.
Zordrak --

Nice How-To !

I especially like that you strongly recommended setting CONFIG_LOCALVERSION
and that you explained the CONFIG_HIGHMEM64G varb.

Many Kernel How-To's miss the LOCALVERSION which can cause disasters

-- kjh
 
Old 12-10-2009, 08:52 AM   #11
zordrak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kjhambrick View Post
Zordrak --
Nice How-To !
Thanks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by kjhambrick View Post
Many Kernel How-To's miss the LOCALVERSION which can cause disasters
-- kjh
Sounds like that comment came from painful personal experience.
 
Old 12-10-2009, 11:16 AM   #12
kjhambrick
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zordrak View Post
Thanks.

Sounds like that comment came from painful personal experience.
Yes. Back in 1999-or-so, during my first Slakware 7 Kernel build, on a machine with a Raid Controller, I omitted the megaraid driver for my shiny-new 2.2.13 Kernel after overwriting a working vmlinuz with my broken one ...

oops !

I learned the hard way why one wants to make a rescue floppy when slakware offers to make one

I also learned to append versions to my hand-rolled kernels

-- kjh
 
Old 12-11-2009, 06:01 AM   #13
onebuck
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Hi,

Plus, I would add that one should not work on a production machine if possible. You can roll your kernel on another machine and port to the production unit. I build on a bench machine all the time and move everything via the network, be it SneakerNet or LAN.

Even then I always leave the running kernel alone until things are polished.

 
  


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