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Old 08-08-2011, 10:38 AM   #16
afreitascs
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I do so without complications and it works for me ... In /etc/rc.d/rc.modules:

Quote:
### CPU frequency scaling support
#
# Below, set CPUFREQ to enable CPU frequency scaling to save system power.
#
# To always try to use CPU frequency scaling, set to: on
# To never use CPU frequency scaling, set to: off
# To use it only when the battery module is loaded (this will cause it to
# be used by default with most laptops), set to: battery
#
CPUFREQ=on

## If CPUFREQ=battery and the battery module is loaded, turn on CPUfreq.
#if [ "$CPUFREQ" = "battery" ]; then
# if /sbin/lsmod | grep -wq battery ; then
# # CPUFREQ=battery and a battery was detected, so change CPUFREQ
# # to 'on' so that the block of script below will try to enable it.
# CPUFREQ=on
# fi
#fi

### Enable CPU frequency scaling if requested:
if [ "$CPUFREQ" = "on" ]; then
### CPU frequency scaling modules for the Linux kernel CPUfreq subsystem.
#
# Clock scaling allows you to change the clock speed of the CPUs on the fly.
# This is a nice method to save battery power, because the lower the clock
# speed is, the less power the CPU consumes.
#
# It should not hurt anything to try to load these modules.
#
# generic ACPI P-States based driver:
# /sbin/modprobe acpi-cpufreq 2>/dev/null
# AMD mobile K6-2/3+ PowerNow!:
# /sbin/modprobe powernow-k6 2>/dev/null
# AMD mobile Athlon PowerNow!:
# /sbin/modprobe powernow-k7 2>/dev/null
# AMD Cool&Quiet PowerNow!:
/sbin/modprobe powernow-k8 2>/dev/null
# Intel SpeedStep using the SMI BIOS interface:
# /sbin/modprobe speedstep-smi 2>/dev/null
# Intel SpeedStep on ICH-based chipsets:
# /sbin/modprobe speedstep-ich 2>/dev/null
# Intel Enhanced SpeedStep :
# /sbin/modprobe speedstep-centrino 2>/dev/null
# Intel Pentium4/Xeon clock modulation is not enabled by default.
# The kernel documentation says "This adds the CPUFreq driver for Intel
# Pentium 4 / XEON processors. When enabled it will lower CPU temperature
# by skipping clocks. This driver should be only used in exceptional
# circumstances when very low power is needed because it causes severe
# slowdowns and noticeable latencies. Normally Speedstep should be used
# instead."
# If you still want to try the Pentium4/Xeon module, uncomment the next line:
#/sbin/modprobe p4-clockmod 2>/dev/null
# NatSemi Geode GX / Cyrix MediaGXm:
# /sbin/modprobe gx-suspmod 2>/dev/null
# Transmeta Crusoe / Efficeon LongRun:
# /sbin/modprobe longrun 2>/dev/null
# VIA Cyrix Longhaul:
# /sbin/modprobe longhaul 2>/dev/null
# nForce2 FSB changing cpufreq driver:
# /sbin/modprobe cpufreq-nforce2 2>/dev/null
# Enhanced PowerSaver driver for VIA C7 CPUs:
# /sbin/modprobe e_powersaver 2>/dev/null

### CPU frequency scaling policies:
#
# Use the CPUFreq governor 'powersave' as default. This sets the
# frequency statically to the lowest frequency supported by the CPU.
#/sbin/modprobe cpufreq_powersave
#
# Use the CPUFreq governor 'performance' as default. This sets the
# frequency statically to the highest frequency supported by the CPU.
#/sbin/modprobe cpufreq_performance
#
# Use the CPUFreq governor 'conservative' as default. This allows you
# to get a full dynamic frequency capable system by simply loading your
# cpufreq low-level hardware driver. Be aware that not all cpufreq
# drivers support the 'conservative' governor -- the fallback governor
# will be the 'performance' governor.
#/sbin/modprobe cpufreq_conservative
#
# Use the CPUFreq governor 'ondemand' as default. This allows you to
# get a full dynamic frequency capable system by simply loading your
# cpufreq low-level hardware driver. Be aware that not all cpufreq
# drivers support the 'ondemand' governor -- the fallback governor will
# be the performance governor. This seems to be the most-recommended
# scaling policy, so rc.modules will try to load this by default.
/sbin/modprobe cpufreq_ondemand 2>/dev/null

### CPU scaling governor:
#
# Set the default scaling_governor to be used (such as userspace or ondemand)
# if there is a CPUFreq scaling policy module loaded that supports it:
SCALING_GOVERNOR=ondemand
#
# Try to enable the scaling_governor selected above:
if [ -r /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_governors ]; then
if grep -wq "$SCALING_GOVERNOR" /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_available_governors ; then
if [ -r /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu0/cpufreq/scaling_governor ]; then
for SYSCPUFILE in /sys/devices/system/cpu/cpu*/cpufreq/scaling_governor ; do
echo "$SCALING_GOVERNOR" > $SYSCPUFILE
done
fi
fi
fi

fi # End enabling CPU scaling support
I do so without complications and it works for me ... In /etc/rc.d/rc.modules:

I used an "Athlon 64 x2 5200+", but now I'm using a "Phenom x4 910". In both rc.modules was configured so and cool'quiet enabled in the BIOS ...

The frequency of my processor varies according to the needs ...

It's all right with my configuration ?

Thanks

Last edited by afreitascs; 08-08-2011 at 11:33 AM.
 
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Old 08-09-2011, 09:05 AM   #17
Bowlslaw
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The CPU is running at 1000MHz, according to this, but my computer is still quite loud. There has been no change.
 
Old 08-09-2011, 09:25 AM   #18
markush
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On my homeserver there is an option in the BIOS where I can configure at which temperature the fan starts to run.

Did you check the options in your BIOS?

Markus
 
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Old 08-09-2011, 11:10 AM   #19
Bowlslaw
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I have enabled cool and quiet in the BIOS, but that doesn't do anything.

Before I go to my BIOS, what settings do you recommend?
 
Old 08-09-2011, 11:54 AM   #20
Woodsman
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Quote:
The CPU is running at 1000MHz, according to this, but my computer is still quite loud. There has been no change.
The noise is caused by the fans, not the CPU. Controlling CPU frequency is only part of the solution you seek. Next you need to add fan speed control.

Quote:
I have enabled cool and quiet in the BIOS, but that doesn't do anything.
Before I go to my BIOS, what settings do you recommend?
The Asus Cool-n-Quiet BIOS feature is for regulating CPU frequency and Vcore voltage.

Regulating CPU frequency and Vcore voltage requires the use of the powernow-k8 kernel module. You have done that. Next focus on fan speed control.

The Asus Q-Fan BIOS feature is for regulating PWM fan speeds.

Fan control, and hence, noise, is dependent upon temperature sensors. When the CPU is set to idle speed, CPU temperature will be lower. When the fan control system is used, the fan speeds can be reduced to match the lower temperature.

Please refer to my previous post for information regarding fan control.
 
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Old 08-09-2011, 01:34 PM   #21
Bowlslaw
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AAAhhhg...so much to deal with. Overwhelming and ANNOYING when I can't get it to work.

I appreciate the help; I'm still trying...
 
Old 08-09-2011, 02:26 PM   #22
wadsworth
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Sure its not the fan on the video card?

My GPU fan is quite annoying, I have to use the proprietary Nvidia driver to slow it down.
 
Old 08-09-2011, 02:31 PM   #23
Woodsman
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Quote:
AAAhhhg...so much to deal with. Overwhelming and ANNOYING when I can't get it to work.
I appreciate the help; I'm still trying...
Been there done that. All computer operating systems are frustrating to one degree or another.

Now that you understand the difference between CPU frequency control and fan speed control, you have half the problem solved.

The basic process looks like this:

1. Enable Cool-n-Quiet in the BIOS. This is necessary to control CPU frequency and voltages.

2. Enable Q-Fan in the BIOS. This option reduces PWM (pulse width modulated) fan speeds with every reboot. The BIOS reduction is only a one-step drop in speed (from full speed to about 55% full speed). To further reduce fan speeds based upon temperature sensors is a function of the operating system but requires Q-Fan to be enabled. Enabling this in the BIOS will reduce fan noise to a less nuisance level, but most people want more noise reduction.

3. Enable CPU frequency regulation. This helps keep CPU temperatures lower.

4. Create a sensors.conf file for your CPU and motherboard temperature sensors. This is the hardest part.

5. Implement a way to start lm_sensors with every reboot. I do this in my rc.local script.

6. Create a fan control configuration file using the pwmconfig command (actually a script). This config file will be used by the fancontrol command (actually a script) to control fan speeds based upon sensor temperatures.

7. Implement a way to run the fancontrol script with every reboot. I created an rc.d script, but my script likely needs some tweaks by other users. You also can start fancontrol in rc.local.

Understand that you can control fan speeds through software only for PWM fans. Not all of the fan connectors on a motherboard support PWM. Also PSU fans are independent of the motherboard. Generic PSU fans are notoriously noisy. PSUs designed for "silent computing" are much better.

If you have a fan on a separate video card then that fan is not controlled by this method either. Controlling those fans usually requires using the proprietary video drivers and software.

Your Asus motherboard BIOS should have a section where you can view temperature sensors and fan speeds. Record those numbers to provide yourself a guide to whether you have lm_sensors and fan speeds configured correctly.

The good news is after you are done you should have a very quiet or virtually silent box. I'm running a 2.3 GHz BE-2400 dual core CPU on an Asus M2NPV-VM motherboard. Typically the CPU idles at 1 GHz. I have a PSU fan, CPU fan, and case fan. The latter two are PWM fans and controllable. I use the on-board video and have no video card fans. The case is about 6 feet from me and I cannot hear anything from the case. I have to stand directly over the case to hear the fans.
 
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Old 08-09-2011, 02:41 PM   #24
EDDY1
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Lots of info here makes me want to go check my machine now.
 
Old 08-09-2011, 03:35 PM   #25
Woodsman
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I mentioned that fan speeds can be controlled by software only for PWM fans. If a user is handy with wire snips, then fan speeds can be controlled through a simple hardware hack too. Splice a 3/4 or 1 watt potentiometer or resistor in series with the 12 volt wire of the fan to reduce the voltage to the fan to about 6 to 7 volts. Lower voltage means slower speeds and less noise. The amount of resistance will vary but will be less than 100 ohms. Be sure to maintain a high enough voltage for the fan to start on power up. The fan will run with a low voltage once started, but too low a voltage and the fan will not start.

I did this many years ago with my Pentium I class computer. The tiny fans for those CPU heat sinks were terribly noisy. Within 15 minutes of buying that computer with the original 233 MHz Pentium MMX, I pulled the plug on the CPU heat sink fan. I never reconnected that fan. I replaced the MMX with a 400 MHz K6-III+ CPU and again ran the box with no CPU heat sink fan. Regardless, I installed a Seagate Barracuda IV hard drive in that box and then with a silent hard drive, the PSU fan became too noisy. I spliced a potentiometer to reduce the fan voltage and hence, noise. After I installed the K6-III+ I installed a chassis fan. I spliced a carbon resistor to the 12 volt wire to reduce the fan voltage to about 7 volts.

That was not my first attempt at silent computing. The chassis fan on my 1991 486 box was like living near an airport. Originally I cut one of the wires on that fan and ran without a chassis fan for a few years. I later modded the box with a 100 MHz Cyrix Hybrid CPU. I spliced a carbon resistor to the chassis fan. The fan still was noisy but bearable. The box still works too.

Last edited by Woodsman; 08-09-2011 at 03:36 PM.
 
Old 08-10-2011, 04:19 AM   #26
BroX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Woodsman View Post
That was not my first attempt at silent computing. The chassis fan on my 1991 486 box was like living near an airport. Originally I cut one of the wires on that fan and ran without a chassis fan for a few years. I later modded the box with a 100 MHz Cyrix Hybrid CPU. I spliced a carbon resistor to the chassis fan. The fan still was noisy but bearable. The box still works too.
Loads of useful info regarding silent computing on this site as well:
http://www.silentpcreview.com/
 
  


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