LinuxQuestions.org
Review your favorite Linux distribution.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 01-21-2014, 11:37 PM   #1
moisespedro
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 767

Rep: Reputation: 80
Is slackware-current worth it?


Would you recommend it over the stable version? If so, why?
 
Old 01-22-2014, 12:16 AM   #2
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Main: Gentoo Others: What fits the task
Posts: 15,576
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036Reputation: 4036
If you want to help with finding bugs or are interested in having the latest version of certain software then go for -current. The downside is that you may find that you will have to fix some SlackBuilds from SBo yourself when using -current, since SBo only supports the stable versions (though you usually can get help from the SBo mailing list or LQ with that). You may also have to to rebuilt packages from SBo if an underlying dependency gets updated.
If that is not what you want, just go for the stable version.

I personally went with -current for quite some time, but at this point in time I prefer the stable version with just some selected packages updated by myself. I used to use -current to get those packages automatically updated, but usually upgrades in -current are rather slow and together with the SBo package situation I convinced myself to go with stable and do the upgrades I want (mostly related to the graphics stack) myself. So far I am satisfied with that.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 01-22-2014 at 12:18 AM.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-22-2014, 05:19 AM   #3
ReaperX7
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jul 2011
Distribution: LFS-SVN, FreeBSD 10.0, CRUX 3.1
Posts: 3,056
Blog Entries: 15

Rep: Reputation: 769Reputation: 769Reputation: 769Reputation: 769Reputation: 769Reputation: 769Reputation: 769
One other issue you'll find with -Current is that if you prefer OEM drivers rather than the open source editions, you'll be constantly rebuilding stuff each kernel revision update. Plus as Tobi said SBo's only support the stable releases, so you'll be limited supportwise to experimental solutions or documented topics rather than official support vectors, and honestly it's bothersome to troubleshoot -Current because packages keep changing.

My advice, and I suggest you consider it, stay with the stable releases only if your using a production level machine, you have sensitive files on your PC, or you want support properly when something breaks.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 08:32 AM   #4
moisespedro
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 767

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 80
Gonna stay with the stable release then, I guess
 
Old 01-22-2014, 09:12 AM   #5
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,163

Rep: Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by moisespedro View Post
Gonna stay with the stable release then, I guess
Most of my Slackware boxes follow stable. As mentioned above when you follow -current some of your applications may break and need to be re-built with your own slackbuild scripts.
I do have one slackware-current box as I like to track changes in our distro and help (in a small way) to report bugs. It is very rare, but, slackware-current will break on occasion.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 10:34 AM   #6
moisespedro
Member
 
Registered: Nov 2013
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 767

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 80
Well, I plan to stay with Slackware, unless my the urge to distro hop attacks again. Just thought that using current would be a way to maintain it "forever", since it is a rolling release. I think I will do a fresh install every slackware stable release then, it seems reasonable.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 10:43 AM   #7
jtsn
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2011
Location: Europe
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 803

Rep: Reputation: 354Reputation: 354Reputation: 354Reputation: 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by moisespedro View Post
Just thought that using current would be a way to maintain it "forever", since it is a rolling release.
Slackware -current is not a rolling release. It is a development snapshot of what will become a future stable Slackware release.

So don't mix -current with production data and don't expect -current to be in a useable for any other purpose than testing the next generation of Slackware.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 11:44 AM   #8
qweasd
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 437

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Ask not what the -current can do for you, ask what you can do for the -current.
~ J. R. "Bob" Dobbs
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-22-2014, 11:54 AM   #9
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,163

Rep: Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by qweasd View Post
Ask not what the -current can do for you, ask what you can do for the -current.
~ J. R. "Bob" Dobbs
Praise Bob!
 
Old 01-22-2014, 01:07 PM   #10
hitest
Senior Member
 
Registered: Mar 2004
Location: Prince Rupert, B.C., Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD
Posts: 4,163

Rep: Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527Reputation: 527
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtsn View Post
So don't mix -current with production data and don't expect -current to be in a useable for any other purpose than testing the next generation of Slackware.
That is a little harsh and also inaccurate. I run my -current box on a day to day basis. I find slackware-current to be very reliable, stable. On occasion breakage will occur, but, it is for the most part usable.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 01:17 PM   #11
Didier Spaier
Senior Member
 
Registered: Nov 2008
Location: Paris, France
Distribution: Slackware{,64}-{14.1,current} on a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 6457-4XG
Posts: 4,184

Rep: Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021Reputation: 1021
Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest View Post
That is a little harsh and also inaccurate. I run my -current box on a day to day basis. I find slackware-current to be very reliable, stable. On occasion breakage will occur, but, it is for the most part usable.
I agree with jtsn. The fact that you run -current doesn't change its main purpose, and using it is not a good advice for a less experienced user, as he won't neither easily solve problems that could occur nor get a big benefit of it vs -stable.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 02:15 PM   #12
Alien Bob
Slackware Contributor
 
Registered: Sep 2005
Location: Eindhoven, The Netherlands
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 5,233

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Deeming Slackware-current fit for no more than a testing ground (implying an unstable crash-prone environment) does not do it any justice at all.
I run Slackware-current on all my desk/lap computers (except for my servers) all the time. I would not be able to get any work done if the whole shebang kept on crashing.
Slackware-current is not for the casual user, that is fact. If you are running Slackware-current, you should be able and are expected to be capable of solving any breakage that occurs with minimal hand-holding. It's not that Slackware itself becomes unusable but the software you are using on top of it stops working properly because of Slackware library updates. And already mentioned, every kernel update creates a bit of tension when you have to find out by trial and error whether the binary Nvidia drivers will work reliably for that new kernel.

Therefore I would never recommend Slackware-current to a non-experienced Slackware user. You do get a fantastically up to date system in return.

Eric
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 01-22-2014, 02:33 PM   #13
Mobile1
Member
 
Registered: Jun 2006
Location: Abbotsford, B.C.
Distribution: Slackware64 14.1
Posts: 103

Rep: Reputation: 6
I run stable on production systems, and on my servers. I do have a box that runs -current ONLY...it's where I live & learn the Slackware world. I still consider myself a non-experienced user, mostly to prevent me from making bad decisions : ) But I have been using Slackware since 1993 off & on, but went 100% Slackware 1 1/2 years ago on my production systems...I have one machine running Windows Pro 8.1 for the other family members who prefer to run Windows on their laptops. It has an external 2 TB Hard Drive for backups. Eventually, everyone in the household will move to a Linux environment.

I like using -current to tinker and try things I wouldn't try on my production systems, for obvious reasons. But Alien Bob's advice is what I recommend as well. Enjoy learning and experimenting with -current, and be productive with stable.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 03:02 PM   #14
stormtracknole
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2005
Location: The Big Easy
Distribution: Slackware, RHEL
Posts: 817

Rep: Reputation: 104Reputation: 104
I run current on all my desktops/laptops. I stay with a stable release on my servers and media box. Usually, I know I could run into problems when either a new kernel or xorg is release. If I see that on the ChangeLog, I usually either test it out on a virtual machine or one of the kids laptop that I don't mind blowing up.
 
Old 01-22-2014, 03:11 PM   #15
qweasd
Member
 
Registered: May 2010
Posts: 437

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
At the moment, I do not use the -current, since I see it as a time and hardware investment. I would love to run the -current some time in the near future though, because I'd like to be an active contributor within the Slackware community. IMHO, there is hardly a better way to do so than by running the dev version, so that I can test new packages, as well as the SlackBuilds I happen to maintain, and provide feedback to the core team.

Some people here have differing opinions, but me personally, I would not run -current on anything even close to "production". I believe that it is possible, especially for the low-concern tasks, but I am just too in love with the lull of the stable branch. Instead, I would have a clean -current system dedicated to testing and building.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slackware ARM (current) epic mistake: the current Android kernels are kicked out! Darth Vader Slackware 16 08-25-2013 04:36 PM
-current and NVidia - is it worth it!? devnull10 Slackware 9 02-06-2011 08:32 PM
[SOLVED] Script to build always a current ISO image of Slackware (slackware-current) robertjinx Slackware 2 12-09-2010 02:00 AM
Is slamd64 worth removing slackware current? cheater1034 Slackware 4 06-13-2005 05:50 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:52 AM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration