LinuxQuestions.org
Visit the LQ Articles and Editorials section
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 09-13-2011, 06:23 PM   #1
kikinovak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: Slackware, Slackware64
Posts: 1,869

Rep: Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937
Installing Slackware on a dedicated server


Hi,

I've been renting a dedicated server for some time now, at the french hoster Online.fr. These servers come preinstalled with a small choice of Linux distributions, among which Ubuntu, Debian, CentOS, Mandriva and some others... but no Slackware.

I'd like to replace the existing system (Ubuntu 10.04 LTS) by Slackware, and I wonder: is there a method to install Slackware from within another distribution, something like 1) download installation ISO to some place on the filesystem 2) edit bootloader to boot it and then 3) install it while squashing the existing system ? Unfortunately there seems to be no way to launch a console to boot an uploaded ISO.

Cheers from the sunny South of France.
 
Old 09-13-2011, 07:15 PM   #2
bonixavier
Member
 
Registered: Sep 2010
Distribution: Slackware
Posts: 320

Rep: Reputation: 62
Extract a/pkgtools to /sbin and then install the rest of the packages using them. You'll probably have a lot of left-over files from Ubuntu. I believe there's a manifest.tar.bz2 with the list of all the files. You could delete all the ones that are not there.
 
Old 09-13-2011, 08:07 PM   #3
NoStressHQ
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Lausanne - Switzerland ( Bordeaux - France / Montreal - QC - Canada)
Distribution: Slackware Leet - 32/64bit
Posts: 313

Rep: Reputation: 108Reputation: 108
Yeah it's one of the reason I went with linode (a bit expensive at first, but very stable, powerful AND slackware compliant).

Btw, I've thought about that problem, but never tried it for real, but I'd try to do it on a VM to be sure, it seems you're an advanced user so I won't explain much, and you might have already the idea too, just install ubuntu in a VM and do some test, you might even be able to write a script to automate the whole process.

I dunno if it's a good path, but I'd do it in a kind of two steps: makes a fs/chroot, luring the boot loader to load slack's kernel, when you're in the slack world, remove the old root and replace it with the new one... There might be some tricks but it must be do-able...

You can start with a very minimal slack install and finish the rest with slackpkg's mirror on the local fs, when you've boot on the new slack.

Good luck ! And if you find a way which works, I think it can be interesting to post a debrief/howto.

Cheers

Garry.
 
Old 09-14-2011, 03:40 AM   #4
kikinovak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: Slackware, Slackware64
Posts: 1,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937
Quote:
Originally Posted by bonixavier View Post
Extract a/pkgtools to /sbin and then install the rest of the packages using them. You'll probably have a lot of left-over files from Ubuntu. I believe there's a manifest.tar.bz2 with the list of all the files. You could delete all the ones that are not there.
I wonder if slackpkg clean-system only erases third-party packages, or if it also handles single files that seem alien (no, not you, Eric ) to the system. Anyway, this morning, I'm feeling mildly adventurous, and I'm currently setting up a test box to see if it's possible to install Slackware 13.37 from within Ubuntu 10.04 and obtain a 100% clean Slackware system. My current hoster has interesting hardware and pricing schemes, so having Slackware on a dedicated server at online.fr would be great.
 
Old 09-14-2011, 05:09 AM   #5
kikinovak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: Slackware, Slackware64
Posts: 1,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937
Ok, I've gotten quite far with my attempt of "transforming" Ubuntu 10.04 LTS Server into Slackware 13.37. First attempt was performed on a sandbox PC, an old NEC Powermate.

1) As suggested, I copied the pkgtools package into the root directory and simply extracted it:

Code:
# tar xvzf pkgtools-13.37-noarch-9.tgz
2) I mounted a Slackware CD on /mnt and installed package groups A, AP, D, L and N like this:

Code:
# cd a
# installpkg *.t?z
# cd ../ap
# installpkg *.t?z
# ...
(Note: I had to install the xz-utils package with 'apt-get install xz-tools' to be able to use the XZ compression within Ubuntu...)

3) Ubuntu uses the GRUB2 boot manager. Normally, it recognizes installed kernels automagically. I simply ran this:

Code:
# update-grub
4) Rebooting resulted - not very surprisingly - in a system freeze, so I hit the Reset button.

5) Slackware booted OK - with a few error messages - but the boot process managed to get through to the login prompt.

6) I ran pkgtool and then went through the Slackware install scripts and ran most of them to replace GRUB2 by LILO, configure hostname, network, services to run on startup, timezone, etc.

The system seems to run OK now, except I'm probably left with a cruft of remaining files from the old Ubuntu installation. I wonder how to get rid of them. I gave slackpkg clean-system a spin, but slackpkg only takes whole packages and not single files into consideration. I vaguely imagine some script parsing the Manifest.bz2 file and removing everything that's not in it, but I fear my scripting competences are not up to the task.

Any suggestions?

Last edited by kikinovak; 09-14-2011 at 06:15 AM.
 
Old 09-14-2011, 07:37 AM   #6
NoStressHQ
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2010
Location: Lausanne - Switzerland ( Bordeaux - France / Montreal - QC - Canada)
Distribution: Slackware Leet - 32/64bit
Posts: 313

Rep: Reputation: 108Reputation: 108
Well the script solution might work, though it can be a bit boring to write and heavy to run. I just had another idea, what about trying to split the partition and install slack on another one, removing the first one, and simply mount the old one at some place, or re-stretch the second partition to fill the space back ? This way you would have a pure 'clean' install...

For the script way, I did something similar some time ago, I can assist you on writing one... Basic idea is to do two list in two files, list what's present on the disc, and the list of what "should be present" (through the packages file list), then do some loop to see what's matching and should be kept and what should be purged... In my script of the kind I didn't really delete the files/dirs, but simply moved them to a temporary directory at first (moreover at development stage to have a fast rollback), and when everything was validated, simply ripped out the 'old crap'.

To have a list of actual files, the `find' command might be useful, and the list of `should have', some kind of "list files in packages" (*) could do the job. Just ask if you're getting stick at some step. But I think trying to have a clean system from start through some kind of isolation (chroot or extra-partition) can be safer/easier/faster. It's just a feeling I might be wrong of course.

(*) Edit: I'm actually on windows, but I can check in my VM run if you need the right command.

Last edited by NoStressHQ; 09-14-2011 at 07:40 AM.
 
Old 09-14-2011, 09:44 AM   #7
kikinovak
Senior Member
 
Registered: Jun 2011
Location: Montpezat (South France)
Distribution: Slackware, Slackware64
Posts: 1,869

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937Reputation: 937
Heya,

After a few hours of intense experimenting, I succeeded! Slackware64 13.37, though not on offer with my hosting company, is now running on my dedicated server. I installed it using the rescue console.

Now I need a siesta and then a huge cup of coffee. I guess later, I'll post the details on how I went about it. I've been using a mix of the Slackworld article on chrooting Slackware and the Gentoo documentation.

* http://slackworld.berlios.de/2007/chroot_howto.html

* http://www.gentoo.org/doc/en/gentoo-...ickinstall.xml

Cheers from the sunny South of France!
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Installing SSL on dedicated server? simonm Linux - Newbie 5 09-17-2010 05:24 PM
[SOLVED] Slackware 13.0 with dedicated link to Windows 2K server lord_beavis Linux - Networking 2 10-08-2009 09:05 AM
Installing Java in a dedicated server tuananhbirm *BSD 1 03-14-2006 08:47 AM
Installing RealVNC on a dedicated server mystic crunk Linux - Networking 1 06-30-2004 09:46 PM
Unreal Tournament 2003 Dedicated Server in Slackware timbelau Linux - Software 0 02-19-2003 03:51 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:34 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration