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glore2002 09-02-2008 01:19 PM

Installing Slackware from scratch.
 
My disk finally seems lost. I tried to recover information with no results. I don't want to keep trying and since most of my info was previously backed up, I will go for a fresh install and I will take this as another learning experience :-)

I will partition with gparted (at least, I will try).

I am planning to install only Slackware 12.1. No more dual boot. No more win sharing my hd (at least, for now). This will make my Slackware learning curve much faster (I guess :-).

So, let me tell you how my Linux partitions were and what I plan to do now:

160Gb HD.

swap (2Gb). System has 4Gb RAM.
/ (ext3) Primary partition
/home (ext3) Primary partition.

Now, I would like to add a new ext3 partition for backups (using rsync following keefaz advice). Can I create a partition called /backup or not? Any suggestion?

Regarding to installation, one of the things Slackware asks when installing and that I am not sure I understand is DOMAIN NAME. The rest of the computers have winxp and the workgroup is INICIOMS. Should I write INICIOMS as the domain? As host name I write slackware5b (name of my slackware computer).

Any advice on partition scheme or domain will be welcome.
Thank you friends!
Glore2002.-

keefaz 09-02-2008 01:31 PM

If you want to reinstall, time to plan a good partition scheme !

For my part, I use:
Code:

/boot (primary partition) size: 200MB filesystem: ext2
/    (primary partition) size: 10GB  filesystem: reiserfs
swap  (primary partition) size: 1GB  filesystem: --

......(extended partition) .....................................
/home        (logical partition) size: 28GB filesystem: reiserfs
/var/backups (logical partition) size: 28GB filesystem: xfs
/srv/docs    (logical partition) size: 10GB filesystem: reiserfs
/srv/videos  (logical partition) size: 54GB filesystem: xfs
/srv/wee    (logical partition) size: 30GB filesystem: reiserfs

I do some backups in /var/backups
/srv/wee is where I put virtual hosts for apache (http server)
and I put doc and videos in /srv/docs and /srv/videos

I use keefaz.biz as domain name :)

glore2002 09-02-2008 02:48 PM

What about this one?
 
Thanks keefaz!!!

What about these ones for a newbie? Is there any need to call the partition /var/backups? What about the filesystem? Should I use ext3 or reiserfs?

The important point is to have two separate partitions: One to backup data and the other as /home.

swap: 2Gb
/: 45 Gb ext3 primary
/home: 55 Gb ext3 primary
/backups: 45 Gb primary ext3


or

swap: 2Gb
/: 40Gb ext3 primary
/home: 45Gb primary
/backups: 40 extended Logical ext3
/docs: 20 extended logical ext3


Am I very wrong? :-)

Glore2002.-

keefaz 09-02-2008 02:59 PM

You're not wrong, but you end with a limited extended partition size with your setup
(meaning you can't add a lot of logical partitions)
Why not set /home as a logical partition ?
It is advised to use primary partitions for swap and /, because of easy drive access,
but it is not required for /home.

It is my opinion, but I think that the extended partition should be bigger,
so you can add more partitions in the future
(remember you have a limit of 4 primary partitions, including the extended,
while you can add up to 63 logical partitions in the extended one with IDE drive)

glore2002 09-02-2008 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by keefaz (Post 3267443)
You're not wrong, but you end with a limited extended partition size with your setup
(meaning you can't add a lot of logical partitions)
Why not set /home as a logical partition ?
It is advised to use primary partitions for swap and /, because of easy drive access,
but it is not required for /home.

It is my opinion, but I think that the extended partition should be bigger,
so you can add more partitions in the future
(remember you have a limit of 4 primary partitions, including the extended,
while you can add up to 63 logical partitions in the extended one with IDE drive)

I see what you mean. Thanks. Let's see this scheme:

swap primary 2Gb
/ primary 45Gb

Extended partition: 100Gb
/home logical 45Gb
/backups logical 35Gb
/docs logical 20Gb


Am I getting closer? Are partition names OK?

Keefaz, I really, really, appreciate your help. Thanks my friend!

keefaz 09-02-2008 03:33 PM

Man, community help is normal, just a little bit of time, don't thank me
I am learning a lot when I help others, I think I figured out the partition numbers (/dev/sda1 sda2 sda3...) now, thanks for your questions!

Partitions names are ok, just make sure Slackware does not use the same names when you name your custom partitions (/docs and /backups are ok)
I like your last partition scheme, although I think 45GB for the root partition is way too big (I did a Slackware full install and it uses only 4.5GB disk space on my / partition).

Woodsman 09-02-2008 04:05 PM

Perhaps the following might help:

Hard Drive Partitioning

My current partition scheme:

Primary Drive:

Primary system

/dev/hda10 on /
/dev/hda1 on /boot
/dev/hda3 on /home
/dev/hda7 on /tmp
/dev/hda8 on /var
/dev/hda9 on /usr
/dev/hda5 on /usr/local
/dev/hda6 on /opt
/dev/hda14 on /home/tmp

Alternate partitions for emergency booting:

/dev/hda11 on /var
/dev/hda12 on /usr
/dev/hda13 on /

Secondary Drive:

/dev/sda1 on /home/public
/dev/sda8 on /home/public/archives

Code:

/dev/hda10          1012M  475M  486M  50% /
/dev/hda1            251M  63M  176M  27% /boot
/dev/hda3            7.9G  2.3G  5.2G  31% /home
/dev/hda7            1012M  83M  878M  9% /tmp
/dev/hda8            2.0G  621M  1.3G  33% /var
/dev/hda9            6.0G  4.4G  1.3G  79% /usr
/dev/hda5            1012M  92M  869M  10% /usr/local
/dev/hda6            1012M  428M  533M  45% /opt
/dev/hda14            26G  18G  7.4G  70% /home/tmp
/dev/sda1              49G  30G  19G  62% /home/public
/dev/sda8            237G  180G  57G  77% /home/public/archives

My primary drive is a 40 GB ATA-100 Seagate Barracuda IV. My secondary drive is a 320 GB SATA-II Western Digital WD3200AAKS-00YGA0.

Partitioning is partly skill, partly need, and partly personal whims. Don't be afraid to try various schemes. A backup strategy of at least /home will allow you to experiment until you find a comfortable scheme.

Quote:

Now, I would like to add a new ext3 partition for backups (using rsync following keefaz advice). Can I create a partition called /backup or not? Any suggestion?
Regarding backup strategies using rsync, rsnapshot is a great tool that uses rsync. Perhaps the following might help:

A Backup Strategy

Quote:

Regarding to installation, one of the things Slackware asks when installing and that I am not sure I understand is DOMAIN NAME. The rest of the computers have winxp and the workgroup is INICIOMS. Should I write INICIOMS as the domain? As host name I write slackware5b (name of my slackware computer).
Just use localdomain for a domain name. Regarding intermixing with a Windows workgroup, that name will come into play when you configure Samba. The two names need not be the same.

I hope this helps. Have fun!

GazL 09-02-2008 06:26 PM

As some of the others have said: partitioning is a very personal choice.
However, just so you have another example, I do mine as follows:

Code:


  Device Boot      Start        End      Blocks  Id  System
/dev/hda1  *          1          13      104391  83  Linux
/dev/hda2              14        2482    19832242+  8e  Linux LVM

/dev/mapper/sysvg-lvroot on / type jfs (rw)
/dev/hda1 on /boot type ext2 (rw)
/dev/mapper/sysvg-lvvar on /var type jfs (rw)
/dev/mapper/sysvg-lvtmp on /tmp type jfs (rw)
/dev/mapper/sysvg-lvhome on /home type jfs (rw)

With the exception of /boot I put everything under lvm (which means it all gets stored in hda2), including the swap space. Using lvm isn't necessary to follow this scheme, you could create hda2 as an extended partition instead and put all the other filesystems in there as logical partitions and get a similar effect.

/var /tmp and /home are each given their own filesystem to separate them from the / filesystem. My reasoning behind this is to reduce any write activity to the / filesystem as much as possible which should help with stability.

I used to have separate partitions for /usr and /opt in the past, but I came to the conclusion that there really wasn't a practical reason for separating them from / so now I don't bother.


@ Keefaz. I like the way you layout your /srv and /var/backups. It's nice to see someone doing it properly. Very tidy. :)

Linux For Ever 09-02-2008 06:46 PM

Hi all slackers.

My advice is using LVM2, so you can resize the partitions in future without losing data.

here is my VolumeGroup info.

Code:

root@linux4ever:~# vgdisplay
  --- Volume group ---
  VG Name              vg0
  System ID
  Format                lvm2
  Metadata Areas        1
  Metadata Sequence No  9
  VG Access            read/write
  VG Status            resizable
  MAX LV                0
  Cur LV                8
  Open LV              8
  Max PV                0
  Cur PV                1
  Act PV                1
  VG Size              36.14 GB
  PE Size              4.00 MB
  Total PE              9252
  Alloc PE / Size      5888 / 23.00 GB
  Free  PE / Size      3364 / 13.14 GB
  VG UUID              5FR2Mr-y9l9-mFa3-oeD2-RsHu-WG5c-XdoG83

and my mount points is this:

Code:

root@linux4ever:~# df
Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/vg0-root  2.0G  164M  1.8G  9% /
/dev/sda1            190M  19M  162M  11% /boot
/dev/sda7            181G  75G  98G  44% /media/repo
/dev/mapper/vg0-home  2.0G  296M  1.6G  16% /home
/dev/mapper/vg0-usr  6.9G  3.3G  3.4G  50% /usr
/dev/mapper/vg0-tmp  1008M  45M  913M  5% /tmp
/dev/mapper/vg0-var  1008M  64M  893M  7% /var
/dev/mapper/vg0-usrlcl
                      3.0G  103M  2.8G  4% /usr/local
/dev/mapper/vg0-opt  2.0G  94M  1.8G  5% /opt
/dev/mapper/vg0-srv  5.0G  4.1G  680M  86% /srv
/dev/sda5              12G  159M  12G  2% /media/tstdst
tmpfs                506M    0  506M  0% /dev/shm

and my filesystem is ext3.

good luck.

onebuck 09-02-2008 06:48 PM

Hi,

I would add that your backup should be 'grandfathered'. Meaning that the backup should not reside on or near the backup system. If you backup to tape, disk or whatever media that stored media should be saved in a remote location (friends). That way if something should happen then you could restore after obtaining the original backup from the storage.

There's nothing saying you should not keep a backup locally but for a true backup then that should be securely stored (grandfathered). The backup cycle would be at the level you feel comfortable with.

Anytime you rely on a local backup for term backup you will fall into a false security level. When the drive fails or system fails then what good is the local backup if not recoverable?

keefaz 09-02-2008 07:18 PM

True words onebuck, for my part I use my /var/backups as temp backups where some tar.gz are waiting to be burned on DVD, also some directories rsync'ed to eventualy (but very unlikely :)) repair user error

glore2002 09-02-2008 09:17 PM

System finally installed!
 
Well, here I am again login in from my Slackware box!

It took some time to install the system and some important packages.
My computer has only Slackware. No more windows. Will I survive? :-)

My partitioning (surely not the best) is:

Code:

/dev/sda1        swap            swap        defaults        0  0
/dev/sda2        /                ext3        defaults        1  1
/dev/sda5        /home            ext3        defaults        1  2
/dev/sda6        /backups        ext3        defaults        1  2
/dev/sda7        /docs            ext3        defaults        1  2
#/dev/cdrom      /mnt/cdrom      auto        noauto,owner,ro  0  0
/dev/fd0        /mnt/floppy      auto        noauto,owner    0  0
devpts          /dev/pts        devpts      gid=5,mode=620  0  0
proc            /proc            proc        defaults        0  0
tmpfs            /dev/shm        tmpfs      defaults        0  0

Primary partitions:
Swap: 2Gb
/: 40Gb
Logical inside an extended partition:
/home: 45Gb
/backups: 35Gb
/docs: 27Gb

I tried to write a document onto /docs and /backups and I couldn't. Do I have to change defaults by umask=000. Please, let me know modifications I should write.

Thanks friends,
Glore2002.-

Linux For Ever 09-03-2008 02:36 AM

Congratulation dude.

All you have to do is change permissions and the owner of these directories.

e.g.

chown -R glore2002.users /docs /backups
chmod -R u+rwx /docs /backups

Now the user owner for these directories is glore2002 and the group owner is users.
The user owner have full permission(read, write and executable).

+ equal add
- equal remove
u equal user owner
g equal group owner
o equal other (not from LOST)
a equal all

and good luck.

keefaz 09-03-2008 05:59 AM

Congrat Glore!
Now if you don't want to repeat the mistake with formating the USB drive, may be write a script like:
Script name: format_my_usb_drive.sh (or choose a better name, choose the program name is the most difficult thing in programming imho :p)
Code:

#!/bin/sh
mkdosfs -I -v /dev/sdb

(use whatever option you like for mkdosfs)
Then chmod +x format_my_usb_drive.sh
and execute it with: ./format_my_usb_drive.sh
The reason to make a script for this is as as you have written the name in the file, you won't be able to do the same mistake (format /dev/sda), and another reason is less words to type :)

glore2002 09-03-2008 06:32 AM

Great!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Linux For Ever (Post 3268004)
Congratulation dude.

All you have to do is change permissions and the owner of these directories.

e.g.

chown -R glore2002.users /docs /backups
chmod -R u+rwx /docs /backups

Now the user owner for these directories is glore2002 and the group owner is users.
The user owner have full permission(read, write and executable).

+ equal add
- equal remove
u equal user owner
g equal group owner
o equal other (not from LOST)
a equal all

and good luck.


Thanks Linux For Ever
! Very clear and complete explanation. As soon as I get home, I will do this and tell you what happened.

Glore2002.-


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