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Old 11-14-2012, 11:43 PM   #16
perbh
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<stepping-onto-soapbox>
Well now - my first experience with Slackware was in - 1996! (Yeah, I know, I'm telling my age!)
Somehow I lost sight of it over time - trying for more 'cutting edge' but I have _always_ kept Slackware on my servers - it just goes and goes and goes and ... ya get the jist? Because of work - I was forced to delve into Redhat - from 4.0 and onwards - and 7.3 must be their best version ever! Used it under protest after 7.3 and the Fedoras ... getting to be too much like 'that other OS'. Found Archlinux in 2005 and have used that up to now (still CentOS for work). I'm about to leave Arch - to _my_ simple mind, they are now scratching an itch trying to be too 'cutting edge', but fortuneately, I have found my first love - Slackware!!
Inbetween I have flirted with most of'em (mint, suse, mandriva/mageia, fedora, solus, debian, zorin, gentoo, vector, whatever ...).

Thank goodness for good ole Slackware - may it always be there!!!
</stepping-onto-soapbox>

Ohh - and let us not forget wm's (ok, desktop systems) - I must've tried'em all at one point or another - xfce has been the system of choice for the past 5 years (with 'lxde' as a close second). kde was ok as long as its first 'name' was '3' - I have refused to use it after that. Same for gnome - '2' was ok, '3' not!

Last edited by perbh; 11-14-2012 at 11:53 PM.
 
Old 11-15-2012, 03:44 AM   #17
jprzybylski
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If you are considering FreeBSD for some challenge, take a quick look at NetBSD. It's about as close as you can get these days to a traditional UNIX environment without paying for it. It's extremely unforgiving, though. If FreeBSD were like Slackware, NetBSD would be akin to something like CRUX.
 
Old 11-15-2012, 07:27 AM   #18
Bazzaah
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Linux From Scratch?
 
Old 11-15-2012, 07:39 AM   #19
markush
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jprzybylski View Post
If you are considering FreeBSD for some challenge, take a quick look at NetBSD. It's about as close as you can get these days to a traditional UNIX environment without paying for it. It's extremely unforgiving, though.
...
Well, I don't have much experience with the BSDs, what is the difference? I know the standard-answers (OpenBSD for security, FreeBSD is most popular, NetBSD runs even on a toaster or a hair-dryer). But you wrote that NetBSD is as closest to traditional Unix, what do you mean with this statement. Id would be interesting to know that.

Markus
 
Old 11-15-2012, 08:40 AM   #20
Habitual
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bazzaah View Post
Linux From Scratch?
What "he" said!
 
Old 11-15-2012, 06:01 PM   #21
Didier Spaier
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I propose you another challenge, which would be to help your fellows Slackers in sharing your knowledge about Slackware with them. You could help feed SlackDocs if not already done, for instance. And/or simply answer questions here .

Last edited by Didier Spaier; 11-15-2012 at 06:08 PM.
 
2 members found this post helpful.
Old 11-15-2012, 06:02 PM   #22
bsdunixdb
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Just an update to let you all know that after 24 hours of FreeBSDing I've decided to dual-boot. That will be so, until I can purchase a 2nd HDD.

I've had problems with pkg_delete in respect of remnants being left in the system. You certainly don't get this with Slackware. I've tried xfce4, kde3 and kde4. Although they were pretty slick, as i said previously I get problems with remnants.

I suppose, in retrospect, that the only real benefit of FreeBSD over Slackware is the large software repository. Certainly from an os point of view, Slackware is faster and less complex to setup.

At the moment I am using PC-BSD which is pretty much a fire-and-forget os. This is so I can take a look at the underlying file setup and configs. The problem with PC-BSD is that it is so slow and, I believe, the PBI's add an extra layer of complexity.

Well, I guess, Slackware will always be my first love as far as an os goes.

Keep rockin' in the free world.

Regards Craig.
 
Old 11-15-2012, 06:31 PM   #23
FeyFre
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Port Slackware to other platform, not ported to by PV or other officials.
Or to platform where Linux itself in embryonic state, and no/few other distributions made it. I guarantee that will be a challenge for long period.
 
Old 11-16-2012, 01:23 AM   #24
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsdunixdb View Post
At the moment I am using PC-BSD which is pretty much a fire-and-forget os. This is so I can take a look at the underlying file setup and configs. The problem with PC-BSD is that it is so slow and, I believe, the PBI's add an extra layer of complexity.
FreeBSD guru Dru Lavigne wrote an excellent book about PC-BSD: "Definitive Guide to PC-BSD", published by Apress. Writing is excellent, very competent, reminds me a bit of Carla Schroder (though less funny), and you'll learn a lot of things about FreeBSD also. Enjoy!
 
Old 11-16-2012, 03:13 AM   #25
solarfields
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Quote:
I propose you another challenge, which would be to help your fellows Slackers in sharing your knowledge about Slackware with them.
+1 for that
you can also join SlackBuilds.org
 
Old 11-16-2012, 09:03 AM   #26
hitest
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Another challenge. When I started with Slackware in 2004 as a new Slacker I was given insightful guidance from Eric, Robby, and too many other experts to name. The LQ Slackware forums are an invaluable resource for Slackers. Helping Slackers here with issues is a very good way to increase our user base. Giving back works.
 
Old 11-16-2012, 09:53 PM   #27
jprzybylski
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markush View Post
Well, I don't have much experience with the BSDs, what is the difference? I know the standard-answers (OpenBSD for security, FreeBSD is most popular, NetBSD runs even on a toaster or a hair-dryer). But you wrote that NetBSD is as closest to traditional Unix, what do you mean with this statement. Id would be interesting to know that.

Markus
NetBSD's userland has stayed, more or less, the same for over a decade. There has been a phenomenal amount of work on very cool stuff, but most of it is very low level (things like xen support and support for new filesystems).

What I mean is that FreeBSD is a place where a lot of cool innovation is going on (I believe that LLVM will be coming with it by default on FreeBSD 9) and administering and using it has changed over time. The NetBSD community has also been hard at work, but their efforts have been far more focused on support for various architectures and protocols, and as a result, the actual act of using NetBSD, setting it up, etc. has stayed more or less the same for quite a while.

Personally, I would probably dual-boot Slackware and FreeBSD if my laptop had better support in BSD land (not their fault, my computer only gained support in Linux on version 2.38), but I would still do lots of playing with NetBSD on a QEMU box. FreeBSD assumes you know a bit about BSD (luckily, their handbook is second to none) but NetBSD makes much more about the BSD land more obvious up front. It's (comparitavely) small, configurable and quick, and it really can run on your toaster. I'd never run it for actual work (I'm not talented enough yet) but it is very good for exploring the nitty-gritty of BSD.

YMMV, of course, and I haven't used either FreeBSD or NetBSD enough to really talk for them. But, check it out.
 
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Old 11-17-2012, 12:09 PM   #28
yilez
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bsdunixdb View Post
Not to start a flame-war, but FreeBSD - and other BSD's - are UNIX aren't they?
Depends on your definition of UNIX.

There is UNIX as in "this OS has been certified as UNIX". These include Mac OS, SCO, AIX and Solaris but don't include BSD or linux.
There is "This OS is a direct descendant of UNIX". BSD falls into that category, Linux doesn't.
Finally there is "This OS might as well be labeled UNIX, even though it can't officially". Linux does fall into this category.

So, BSD isn't officially UNIX. I believe that the distinction is a whole load of red tape, and there is nothing wrong with calling BSD, or Linux, UNIX.

As for FreeBSD... a former Slackware user I know prefered NetBSD over FreeBSD. I think at the time (2002 or so), FreeBSD had a reputation of being 'easy', in much the same way as Mandrake and Redhat did. I suppose it just depends what you want.
 
Old 11-18-2012, 11:26 AM   #29
hitest
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OpenBSD 5.2 with XFce 4.10. Lean and fast.

Last edited by hitest; 11-01-2014 at 09:04 PM.
 
Old 11-19-2012, 12:57 AM   #30
bobzilla
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yilez View Post
There is "This OS is a direct descendant of UNIX". BSD falls into that category, Linux doesn't.
It depends what you put under "BSD" moniker. Today's BSDs are not direct descendants. If they were, they would be burried deeply in the court archives of some Californian or U.S. federal court.

According to Wikipedia:
Quote:
After Net/1, BSD developer Keith Bostic proposed that more non-AT&T sections of the BSD system be released under the same license as Net/1. To this end, he started a project to reimplement most of the standard Unix utilities without using the AT&T code. Within eighteen months, all the AT&T utilities had been replaced, and it was determined that only a few AT&T files remained in the kernel. These files were removed, and the result was the June 1991 release of Networking Release 2 (Net/2), a nearly complete operating system that was freely distributable.
As BSD Lite 4.4 (and later 386BSD), on which modern BSD's are based, didn't include any AT&T code, they are practically a clones of Unix.

Quote:
Originally Posted by yilez View Post
Finally there is "This OS might as well be labeled UNIX, even though it can't officially". Linux does fall into this category.
Well, it could be. Unix(TM) is not an OS anymore, but a set of standards (or better said a specification) under the control (and trademark) of the Open Group. Any OS that gets certified is an Unix OS. While it's true Linux as kernel can't be certified, that doesn't mean some distributor/vendor can't try to certify a (GNU or non-GNU) Linux distribution. LSB is in large part based on SUS certification, so I would guess there are Linux distributions that have pretty high SUS compatibility. I would even argue that's the case with the most GNU/Linux distributions today.

Quote:
I believe that the distinction is a whole load of red tape, and there is nothing wrong with calling BSD, or Linux, UNIX.
Agreed.

Quote:
As for FreeBSD... a former Slackware user I know prefered NetBSD over FreeBSD. I think at the time (2002 or so), FreeBSD had a reputation of being 'easy', in much the same way as Mandrake and Redhat did. I suppose it just depends what you want.
I played a bit with FreeBSD and NetBSD and I get the same impression today. Getting started with FreeBSD is too easy for Slackers. NetBSD is more interesting (uhm... challenging?).
 
  


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