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Old 09-21-2004, 10:33 PM   #1
ngan_yine
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Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware 10.1
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I can't find .bashrc in slackware


Hi guy

I know this sound very stupid but I got to ask because I am out of idea ,I use to be a mandrake user and suddenly I decide to change to slackware and I like what I found.
But I had been finding .bashrc in slackware and I can't seem to find it ,I try all the data base search command but there is just no .bashrc .So could any of you guy tell me what to do if I want to add some vauable to my bash file?

thanks
 
Old 09-21-2004, 10:34 PM   #2
gbonvehi
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It isn't created by default, just create it with your favourite editor

Btw, it must be created in your home directory. Mine would be: /home/gbon/.bashrc

Last edited by gbonvehi; 09-22-2004 at 12:21 AM.
 
Old 09-22-2004, 12:18 AM   #3
Sadrul
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Registered: Mar 2004
Distribution: Slackware 10.0 (K: 2.4.26)
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you can create .bashrc, but i don't think it will work. rather create/edit the .bash_profile file.

-- Adil
 
Old 09-22-2004, 12:41 AM   #4
theonebeyond
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Yeah... I had the problem too, and as Sadrul said, use .bash_profile for users..

But if I remember right .bashrc works for root (only)

Greetings, Sascha
 
Old 09-22-2004, 12:47 AM   #5
gbonvehi
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Actually i realized after reading what Sadrul said, that my bash_profile loads bashrc for me, sorry ngan_yine, do what they said
 
Old 09-22-2004, 02:06 AM   #6
ngan_yine
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Thanks man
That really help me a lot , as you guys said .bashrc only work for root and not for normal user ,I guess I got to go a long with .bash_profile for my normal user.I was trying to add some enveroment variable PATH to my bash file .In mandrake I can just open the .basrc in /home/~/.bashrc but in slackware the file didn't
didn't exist at all.My experience with linux is still in newbie level but I always thought that bash shell PATH file got to be kept in that .bashrc.I am having a lot of problem with slackware but this one is really worth it.I gave up mandrake and fedore althought it is less painful to operate.
 
Old 09-22-2004, 03:10 AM   #7
Cedrik
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In doubt, read man bash

When bash is invoked as an interactive login shell, or as a non-interactive shell
with the --login option, it first reads and executes commands from the file
/etc/profile, After reading that file, it looks for ~/.bash_profile...

When an interactive shell that is not a login shell is started, bash
reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc

So when you enter in runlevel 3 and then login, bash will read ~/.bash_profile,
but if you startx and then open a new terminal without -ls switch, then bash will read ~/.bashrc...

As gbonvehi said, if you want ~/.bashrc loads no matter if it is at login or when
open a new terminal, just create a ~/.bash_profile like this :

Code:
if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
    source ~/.bashrc
fi
So if there is a ~/.bashrc in your home directory it will be loaded at login or when
open a non-login shell
 
1 members found this post helpful.
Old 09-22-2004, 04:52 AM   #8
DaneM
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Something you might want to note is that BASH loads configuration/init files in roughly this order:

/etc/profile (global settings)
/etc/inputrc (global settings)
/etc/profile.d (global settings)
/etc/bashrc (global settings, but only read if "sourced" from another configuration file -- not created in slackware by default, but very useful for path settings, etc.)
~/.bash_profile (user-specific settings)
~/.bashrc (user-specific settings, but only read if "sourced" from another file, like Cedrik says)
~/.bash_login (user-specific settings to be executed upon login, such as greetings, etc.)

If you would like to apply settings from /etc/bashrc, it's best to put "source /etc/bashrc" at the BEGINNING of ~/.bash_profile or ~/.bashrc . This will load all the global variables from /etc/bashrc but allow your user-specific settings to override them. You can find more indespensible information on BASH and other cool Linux stuff at http://www.tldp.org/guides.html . Good luck with your new Slackware installation!

--Dane
 
Old 01-14-2009, 02:56 PM   #9
dikiy
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nice help all...
 
Old 09-11-2009, 01:48 PM   #10
caduqued
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Registered: Apr 2008
Location: Coventry, United Kingdom
Distribution: Slackware64, Slackware64 13.37, linuxslackware
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cedrik View Post
In doubt, read man bash

When bash is invoked as an interactive login shell, or as a non-interactive shell
with the --login option, it first reads and executes commands from the file
/etc/profile, After reading that file, it looks for ~/.bash_profile...

When an interactive shell that is not a login shell is started, bash
reads and executes commands from ~/.bashrc

So when you enter in runlevel 3 and then login, bash will read ~/.bash_profile,
but if you startx and then open a new terminal without -ls switch, then bash will read ~/.bashrc...

As gbonvehi said, if you want ~/.bashrc loads no matter if it is at login or when
open a new terminal, just create a ~/.bash_profile like this :

Code:
if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
    source ~/.bashrc
fi
So if there is a ~/.bashrc in your home directory it will be loaded at login or when
open a non-login shell
Nice explanation: plain, clear and simple....
 
  


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