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Old 11-02-2007, 10:27 AM   #1
Denisius
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Huge.s V.S hugesmp.s


What is the difference between the two?
 
Old 11-02-2007, 10:40 AM   #2
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The latter is for multiple CPUs.
 
Old 11-02-2007, 10:41 AM   #3
duryodhan
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symmetric_multiprocessing
 
Old 11-02-2007, 10:24 PM   #4
Vincent_Vega
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Like I said... If your computer has 'Hyperthreading' or if it's a dual core, etc., you'll want to use SMP. If it's an older machine then the basic huge kernel will suffice.
 
Old 11-02-2007, 11:50 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vincent_Vega View Post
Like I said... If your computer has 'Hyperthreading' or if it's a dual core, etc., you'll want to use SMP. If it's an older machine then the basic huge kernel will suffice.
but you really should be using a -generic kernel rather than a huge one.

Brian
 
Old 11-03-2007, 02:55 AM   #6
MS3FGX
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According to the release notes, it is best to use the SMP generic on everything, regardless of wether or not it actually has symmetrical processors.

That said, you need an initrd for the generics, which some people simply don't want to do; I know I certainly don't. Not that I have ever used a stock Slackware kernel, though.
 
Old 11-03-2007, 05:57 AM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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I don't quite believe that. Some older machines hang with SMP enabled. I'm sure there was such a case in this forum.

Really, you should compile your own kernel.
 
Old 11-03-2007, 08:41 AM   #8
onebuck
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Hi,

Quote:
Originally Posted by H_TeXMeX_H View Post
I don't quite believe that. Some older machines hang with SMP enabled. I'm sure there was such a case in this forum.

Really, you should compile your own kernel.
That would depend on what you define as 'older' machine. I've used the SMP kernels on a lot of Intel and AMD processors that most people would class as 'older' without nary a problem. Sure, sometimes a compile was in order to tweak for special hardware but the SMP kernel basically worked.

Compiling a new kernel cleans things up for me. Not done for performance since that would not be the case for trimming. Unless you are booting all the time. You might gain a little on the load time but that would be negligible.

The generic kernels should be used instead of the huge kernels. You will notice that a lot of the problems on LQ are related to people using the huge kernels. They usually don't read the 'txt' files that PV provides;

Slackware 12.0 CHANGES_AND_HINTS.TXT, UPGRADE.TXT and RELEASE_NOTES!
 
Old 11-03-2007, 03:19 PM   #9
arubin
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FWIW when I was investigating installing slackware on our dell inspiron 1501 which has a dual Athlon processor I found that it froze on booting with hugesmp but would boot with huge.s which rather surprised me.

If I do install slackware to it I will compile a custom kernel.
 
Old 11-03-2007, 04:09 PM   #10
H_TeXMeX_H
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Thanks, it was you that had that problem. I'm just too lazy to look up the post And I don't think that computer is that old either, so it can happen even on newer machines.

I personally don't see much use in having a hugesmp kernel as on install kernel. For an "install kernel" (I know I probably just invented a new term, this means the kernel booted by default in order to install an OS such as Slackware) you don't need SMP, just as many things compiled in as will allow maximum, but safe detection of hardware (HDDs, CD/DVD-ROMS, etc.) without chance of hanging.

A regular "everyday kernel", on the other hand, should have as little compiled into it as possible (only as modules), in order to prevent driver conflicts and other odd problems. This is why generic kernels are recommended. I guess if you combine this with an initrd, there is absolutely no need to compile your own kernel. But, I have to tell you, you're missing out on a unique and somewhat challenging (at first) experience And, who knows ... maybe you can even make your computer run infinitesimally faster by customizing the kernel for your computer (mostly the processor options)

Last edited by H_TeXMeX_H; 11-03-2007 at 04:11 PM.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 08:45 AM   #11
duryodhan
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Quote:
make your computer run infinitesimally faster
the difference is usually very noticeable.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 10:04 AM   #12
MS3FGX
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Yes, the performance increase you will get by moving from the titanic default Slackware kernels to one built specifically for your machine is going to be anything but infinitesimal. It is a very noticeable increase on more modern hardware, though older machines will not reap quite as large of an increase.

I have built custom kernels for machines that have gotten them ridiculous increases in performance. I recall one laptop in particular that had such a large performance increase that we knew it was working better before we even logged into the thing...we could see immediately that even the boot messages were moving much faster than before.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 10:35 AM   #13
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I usually only notice it on SMP machines that were previously running non-SMP kernels. Otherwise, the difference is not that big, unless the default kernel is very bloated.
 
Old 11-04-2007, 02:41 PM   #14
MS3FGX
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Which default kernels will always be, by necessity.
 
  


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