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Old 04-26-2007, 11:09 AM   #1
aquaboot
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From Debian to Slack


Hi All,

Ok, its time for me to try Slackware. I'm a Debian/Ubuntu guy and just want to make sure I understand the iso download process. Do I have to download several cds or is there an option to do a net install (like what I'm used to) where I get the basics and repository the rest. I appreciate your time and help.

Sincerely,

ab
 
Old 04-26-2007, 11:11 AM   #2
masonm
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Download the first 2.
 
Old 04-26-2007, 11:17 AM   #3
aquaboot
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Thanks for the quick reply. So, I download disk #2 first. Am I missing anything by not downloading disk #1 and what about #3 and so on...

I really appreciate your help.

-ab
 
Old 04-26-2007, 11:18 AM   #4
aquaboot
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Whoops, excuse me. So you're saying the first 2 isos. What about the following isos?

-ab
 
Old 04-26-2007, 11:52 AM   #5
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Download iso cd #1 and #2. However it's better to download the dvd iso if you have a dvd writer, you won't need to change cds during installation
I suggest you do a full install and later remove what you don't need. Take a look at shilo's site.
Are gonna boot debian & slackware? using grub or lilo?
I come from debian too, had both installed and realized slackware's way more responsive, faster, lighter, didn't get in the way, forces you to learn the 'linux' way and compiles everything you try.
I don't think you're going back, but take it slow.
Welcome to slackware, enjoy!
 
Old 04-26-2007, 11:59 AM   #6
rworkman
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Technically, you can have a "functional" system by installing only the A package set from disc 1, but that's a *very* minimal system. In all likelihood, you want to install at least the contents of disc 1 - that will get you a very usable system (networking, etcetera, fluxbox and xfce). Some of the XAP package set is on disc #2, so you'll almost certainly want that disc (kde is also on it). Disc #3 can perhaps be skipped, but then, I don't recall exactly what's on it.

Either way, even if you don't install some packages that you later find out you need, you can find them on a Slackware mirror.
 
Old 04-26-2007, 02:04 PM   #7
H_TeXMeX_H
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The best way (if you're using CDs) is download and burn CD #1 and CD #2. Boot CD #1, install and it will ask you for CD #2. That's it. For boot manager, if you want lilo, install it to the MBR. If you have grub an the Debian partition, you could skip installing lilo, but change the grub config to give an option for Slackware.
 
Old 04-26-2007, 05:48 PM   #8
aquaboot
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Thanks for the great info. Can't wait to get started.

-ab
 
Old 04-27-2007, 09:15 AM   #9
hitest
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If you want to install a 2.6x kernel don't forget to install your kernel headers and kernel modules. The kernel headers, modules for the 2.6.17.13 kernel are located on CD #2 and the kernel headers, modules for the 2.6.18 kernel are located on CD #4.
 
Old 04-27-2007, 09:35 AM   #10
rworkman
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In most cases, you don't *need* the kernel-headers package forthe 2.6 kernel; there are a few additional software packages that will require 2.6 kernel headers, but unless you run across something that needs them, you're safer to stick with the kernel-headers package that's included in the base system.

Have a look at this post for a bit more information: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...04#post2629704
 
Old 04-27-2007, 11:10 AM   #11
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rworkman
In most cases, you don't *need* the kernel-headers package forthe 2.6 kernel; there are a few additional software packages that will require 2.6 kernel headers, but unless you run across something that needs them, you're safer to stick with the kernel-headers package that's included in the base system.

Have a look at this post for a bit more information: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...04#post2629704
From my experience I've found it best to install the kernel modules, headers for the 2.6x kernel that you're installing (those headers, modules are designed to work with the 2.6x kernels). I've failed to do that once and had a system that wouldn't boot. I've run the 2.6x kernels in Slackware 10.2 and 11 and have never had a problem using this method.
 
Old 04-27-2007, 11:26 AM   #12
rworkman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest
From my experience I've found it best to install the kernel modules, headers for the 2.6x kernel that you're installing (those headers, modules are designed to work with the 2.6x kernels). I've failed to do that once and had a system that wouldn't boot. I've run the 2.6x kernels in Slackware 10.2 and 11 and have never had a problem using this method.
You most likely won't have a problem using this method, but you could - that's why there's the big fat HEADERS.WARNING from Pat.

As for your system failing to boot, it had absolutely *nothing* to do with failing to install 2.6 kernel headers package.
 
Old 04-27-2007, 11:09 PM   #13
hitest
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rworkman
You most likely won't have a problem using this method, but you could - that's why there's the big fat HEADERS.WARNING from Pat.
I've installed the kernel headers, modules for 2.6.17.13 and 2.6.18 many times on several systems with no problems, my systems work just fine.
Have you tried this method yourself?

BTW, this method is used when you install a 2.6.17.13 kernel or a 2.6.18 kernel from the Slackware CDs or DVD. I'll start the install using a 2.6x kernel and also install the 2.6x kernel later in the install process when prompted.

Last edited by hitest; 04-27-2007 at 11:20 PM.
 
Old 04-27-2007, 11:20 PM   #14
rworkman
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hitest
I've installed the kernel headers, modules for 2.6.17.13 and 2.6.18 many times on several systems with no problems, my systems work just fine.
I understand that. As I pointed out, it's certainly possible (even likely) that you will not have any problems. However, there's no guarantee. Therefore, to be safe, stick with the stock kernel-headers unless you *need* the 2.6 headers. See http://slackware.osuosl.org/slackwar...eaders.WARNING

Quote:
Have you tried this method yourself?
It's not relevant to the point at hand, but yes, I have. In testing various things, I've needed 2.6 headers for development. Whether I have or have not actually done it, however, is wholly and completely unrelated to whether the advice I'm giving is correct.

Quote:
BTW, this method is used when you install a 2.6.17.13 kernel or a 2.6.18 kernel from the Slackware CDs or DVD.
No, it's not. It may very well be the method that *you* use when installing a 2.6.1{7.13,18} kernel from the Slackware CD or DVD, but it most certainly does not happen automatically. See http://slackware.osuosl.org/slackwar.../RELEASE_NOTES
 
Old 04-27-2007, 11:29 PM   #15
hitest
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by rworkman



No, it's not. It may very well be the method that *you* use when installing a 2.6.1{7.13,18} kernel from the Slackware CD or DVD, but it most certainly does not happen automatically. See http://slackware.osuosl.org/slackwar.../RELEASE_NOTES
I did not mean to imply that the method happens automatically. After the installation is completed you need to boot the new system and then mount your CD or DVD and then manually install the modules, headers at the command prompt. Each to his own:-)
Installing the 2.6x kernel is a straight-forward part of the install.

Last edited by hitest; 04-27-2007 at 11:32 PM.
 
  


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