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Old 10-15-2008, 03:03 PM   #76
brianL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
It really sounds like you guys are having fun. Keep it up!
Yeah, definitely.
I'm going to hunt down old versions of other distros, if they have .isos available. I don't thinking loading 40 virtual floppies sounds like an exciting prospect, even though it would add to the authenticity.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 05:55 PM   #77
niels.horn
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onebuck:
You're probably about my age then... I started with 8080 machines as well. HEX-only keyboards in the beginning, programming in assembly. Knew the opcodes of the processor by heart Later moved on to the TRS-80 (still have two here) and CP/M machines.
My CP/M machine came with all the sources so I started hacking the OS to increase performance (faster disk I/O, bigger disk drives, etc.) and to connect new devices.
Of course I do have the emulator for the TRS-80 running in Linux and I read there is a CP/M emulator somewhere out there as well.

brianL:
The sunsite I mentioned in an earlier post has old versions of Debian, Red Hat and many now defunct distros.
And I have some old Minix floppies around here. I think the whole system was only like three or four 1.44M disks, if my memory is still ok.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 06:17 PM   #78
bgeddy
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Quote:
You're probably about my age then... I started with 8080 machines as well. HEX-only keyboards in the beginning, programming in assembly. Knew the opcodes of the processor by heart Later moved on to the TRS-80 (still have two here) and CP/M machines.
Funny you should mention this. When this thread started it got me thinking back and I hunted down an image of CPM-86 but gave up trying to get in to work in a VM.

Seems there's a few of us "old gits" around !
 
Old 10-15-2008, 07:05 PM   #79
niels.horn
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Seems there's a few of us "old gits" around !
Well, I don't want to mention my age here, but I actually started writing programs using punch cards in the mid- to late- seventies..
Funny thing is I never saw the computer. I used to submit a stack of cards and receive the output on paper with the result. That was the 136-column-wide continuous paper, of course...

A colleague at work uses the Hercules emulator (emulates an IBM Mainframe) on his HP notebook that has processing power unimaginable in those days

Getting old... But it is still fun!
 
Old 10-15-2008, 08:21 PM   #80
bgeddy
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That was the 136-column-wide continuous paper, of course...
I remeber 132 column - didn't know there was 136 column - but hey I'm getting OT..
 
Old 10-15-2008, 08:48 PM   #81
niels.horn
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I remeber 132 column - didn't know there was 136 column - but hey I'm getting OT..
hm... you might be right... The line-printers were 132 columns. I think the 136 columns was when we started using 80-column paper with 17CPI dot-matrix printers... (80x1.7=136).
Oh well, that's a long time ago...
 
Old 10-15-2008, 09:06 PM   #82
onebuck
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Hi,

Aw, the world of unit records. I remember having to program those damn punch machines. Get it right an let one of the girls do the typing. They were always faster at typing and I'm not being a sexist either. Some of my program decks took a box.

Ya, the 8080 was a nice little processor but the Z80 was the beast. I still have the TRS-80 along with the interface that I built to allow me hdd, extended memory and a buss expansion with data/address I/O. Also had a trap & debugger.

The code today is no where as tight as what we had to produce. The memory was tight thus prevented the waste we see with todays code. Everyone now wants to work with high level code therefore the memory is really not a issue to most people. Don't get me wrong there are some great coders out there but most fall into this trap of excess. Memories of yester year! An I do mean years.
 
Old 10-15-2008, 10:19 PM   #83
niels.horn
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Everyone now wants to work with high level code therefore the memory is really not a issue to most people. Don't get me wrong there are some great coders out there but most fall into this trap of excess.
I know what you mean...
Back in those days we were forced to write programs in 4K or 16K in machine code. Every byte counted... Now kids write pages of code and don't care about performance, as processors became faster and faster... I see this happening every day at work. Of course there are geniuses out there (and here) but I see so many programmers writing code without a clue what they're doing. But hey, it's Java so it must be good!
 
Old 10-16-2008, 02:40 AM   #84
brianL
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It's funny you should mention punched cards, because I came across this while browsing yesterday:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:IBM_Port-A-Punch.jpg

It's from 1958, it was linked to from reddit.

http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/

If I'd have been into computing then, I could have asked for one of those for my 13th birthday.

Last edited by brianL; 10-16-2008 at 02:45 AM.
 
  


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