LinuxQuestions.org
Did you know LQ has a Linux Hardware Compatibility List?
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices



Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 12-02-2012, 04:18 PM   #31
gapan
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Posts: 344

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106

Quote:
Originally Posted by samac View Post
Nope. I have gnustep-base installed but I don't have openapp on my system. I have downloaded and installed gnustep-make-2.6.2-x86_64-2gv.txz and the problem is sorted. I guess that you should add that package to the deps list.
Ah, right. Thanks for that. I somehow thought that openapp was in gnustep-base instead. Fixed!
 
Old 12-03-2012, 12:20 PM   #32
linuxxer
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: I have my own planet
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 72
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by malekmustaq View Post
I can hardly distinguish SUBSTANTIAL DIFFERENCE between the two.
I use Slackware, because Slackware is very simple OS.
Simple to learn.
Simple to understand
Simple to tweak.
And if some problem occur, then it is very SIMPLE to resolve the problem.

netconfig is sufficient to configure network.
slackpkg is sufficient to install new package, update packages or upgrade full system.
sbopkg is sufficient to deal with slackbuilds.

Then what is need of graphical tools to configure hostname.
Glslapt, sourcery tools for package management.

Slackware is very simple OS.
Salix team wants to add some user friendly touch to Slackware.
It is also good.

In terms of philosophy, some difference exist between Slackware and Salix.
Becase of this Salix is NOT Slackware.

NOT an argument, just discussion.
 
Old 12-03-2012, 12:30 PM   #33
linuxxer
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: I have my own planet
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 72
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by malekmustaq View Post
It is obvious now that you have not installed Salix OS from a liveCD. You should know the difference from this point if you are comparing with Slackware version 'all' --installation-wise Salix LiveCD is EVIDENTLY faster by less than half the time you need through installing basic Slack: (all-things-equal == same kernel == same Xfce4 DE)

Also, you should give a moment of pondering over my adjectives: 'light' and 'fast' for these attributes of Slackware are tailored ready by install under Salix. I mean: you have to tune up first your Slackware FULL installation, to run as fast as (same version and same "kernel.smp") under Salix preconfigurations. I have compared this already under the same machine. Quicker response is attained "ready" at first boot under Salix 13.37, but the same kernel of Slackware I still have to tune it up. This is one important achievement of Salix over basic Slackware. Of course, being aware, that the reason for this is the Salix philosophy.
You are right,
I have not installed Salix on hard drive.
I just tried Salix Live CD.
I installed Slackware and tried to configure Salix repository on Slackware.

While installing Slackware,
it is not compulsory to choose full installation mode.
I prefer XFCE so I skiped kde directory and few packages, few sever related packages, which I don't need.

Slackware installation consist of,
prepare partition,
choose packages,
after that just extract tarballs and run package configuration script (doinst.sh).
And few postinstallation steps.
It is very simple.

Because of this,
I wrote, "Slackware installation process is very simple and fast".

Some difference exist between Slackware and Salix.
After Slackware installation some configuration is required,
On Slackware, you have to configure system as per your need.
 
Old 12-03-2012, 12:34 PM   #34
linuxxer
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: I have my own planet
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 72
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by gapan View Post
Why do you think they were unnecessary? They are not. Otherwise they wouldn't be dependencies
That's the general idea of what should happen if that one package has dependencies on other packages that you don't have installed. Otherwise that one package wouldn't work after you have installed it.
During Slackware Installation,
I had not choosen full installation mode.

I don't how I skip CUPS package.
May be, because of I don't have printer.
After that I install slapt-get, Gslapt.
I configured Salix repository.
When I tries to install epdfview,
that time Gslapt adds CUPS as dependency for epdfview.
I download epdfview from Slackbuilds.Org,
compile it and installed.
And epdfview is running properly, without CUPS.

I know CUPS is standard package.
But this is good example.

On server system, I did minimal Slackware installtion.
Around 380 installed packages.
When I first time tried to run vim editor it fails,
because two missing liberies, libperl*, and libpython*.
I want to maintain less packages on system,
so I just copied two missing libries from another Slackware system.

On typical dependency management system.
To install vim, Perl and Python two scripting languages get added into required packages list.
And to satisfy Perl and Python dependency few more packages get added into the list.
You can't install vim without installing all these packages

On dependency-based package management system,
they breaks packages into small units,
if one package need a file which is part of another package,
then that package automatically get added into required package list.

Sometimes to help user, they add few packages as dependency,
So less commands or less no's of package name agrument is required
to do the installation.

If you don't want certain feacture which distributor provides,
you can't uninstall it, because it is hard-coded into package management system.

This is disadvantages of dependency-base package management system.
Sometimes, it become difficult to handle package conflit problem.


Lack of dependency resolution is ONE IMPORTANT FEATURE of Slackware package management system.


Confusion occur, because I used wrong word "unnecessary" to express the meaning.

Last edited by linuxxer; 12-03-2012 at 04:39 PM.
 
Old 12-03-2012, 02:27 PM   #35
TobiSGD
Moderator
 
Registered: Dec 2009
Location: Hanover, Germany
Distribution: Main: Gentoo Others: What fits the task
Posts: 15,653
Blog Entries: 2

Rep: Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097Reputation: 4097
Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxxer View Post
On server system, I did minimal Slackware installtion.
Around 380 installed packages.
When I first time tried to run vim editor it fails,
because two missing liberies, libperl*, and libpython*.
I want to maintain less packages on system,
so I just copied two missing libries from another Slackware system.
I don't think that is a good idea, especially on server systems. Now you have to keep track yourself if there are any fixed vulnerabilities in those libraries and have to upgrade those libraries if so. If you would just have installed the packages then you could easily use slackpkg to upgrade the whole system.

Back on-topic: While I usually use Slackware on all my machines I maintain a few system where I didn't want to hassle with the configuration, for example the jukebox in our party room. Since this is a rather old system I just put a base install of Salix LXDE on it, installed Audacious on it and gave it access to the file server. Done, very fast, very easy.
On any system I really work with I use Slackware, but Salix is a good distro if I need a fast deployment for a special purpose.

Last edited by TobiSGD; 12-03-2012 at 02:28 PM.
 
Old 12-03-2012, 04:05 PM   #36
NyteOwl
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD, others periodically
Posts: 512

Rep: Reputation: 139Reputation: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by gapan View Post
What? This doesn't make any sense at all.
Other than a minor typo, what is hard to understand?

The Ubuntu is derived from Debian (by extension so are KBuntu, Xbuntu etc).

Salix is derived from Slackware.

However Ubuntu is NOT Debian and Salix is NOT Slackware.

Hard to make it any clearer than that.

Last edited by NyteOwl; 12-03-2012 at 04:08 PM. Reason: fixed typos this time
 
Old 12-03-2012, 04:54 PM   #37
linuxxer
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: I have my own planet
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 72
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
I don't think that is a good idea, especially on server systems. Now you have to keep track yourself if there are any fixed vulnerabilities in those libraries and have to upgrade those libraries if so. If you would just have installed the packages then you could easily use slackpkg to upgrade the whole system.
I agree.
It is difficult, but it is possible.
Just need to write some shell script.

Quote:
On server system, I did minimal Slackware installtion.
Around 380 installed packages.
When I first time tried to run vim editor it fails,
because two missing liberies, libperl*, and libpython*.
I want to maintain less packages on system,
so I just copied two missing libries from another Slackware system.
It means it is possible to handle dependency by own method.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TobiSGD View Post
On any system I really work with I use Slackware, but Salix is a good distro if I need a fast deployment for a special purpose.
I completely agree.
Every system having its own advantages.

Last edited by linuxxer; 12-03-2012 at 05:34 PM.
 
Old 12-04-2012, 04:12 AM   #38
gapan
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Posts: 344

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyteOwl View Post
Other than a minor typo, what is hard to understand?
It's hard to understand something that is not written clearly and it's not about the typo. What you wrote:
Quote:
The 'buntus are derived from Debian, Salix is derived from Slackware. Neither are their parent distoros.
could easily mean "ubuntu is derived from debian but debian is not the parent distro of ubuntu" and that's how I read it. And that doesn't make any sense. Please try to express you thoughts more clearly next time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyteOwl View Post
The Ubuntu is derived from Debian (by extension so are KBuntu, Xbuntu etc).

Salix is derived from Slackware.

However Ubuntu is NOT Debian and Salix is NOT Slackware.
Once again I'm going to reply with exactly the same post. Seems that you didn't read it the first time around: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questi...3/#post4840944

Quote:
Originally Posted by NyteOwl View Post
Hard to make it any clearer than that.
No, you got it right the second time. Not that hard after all, was it?
 
Old 12-04-2012, 04:22 AM   #39
gapan
Member
 
Registered: Feb 2007
Posts: 344

Rep: Reputation: 106Reputation: 106
Quote:
Originally Posted by linuxxer View Post
I don't how I skip CUPS package.
May be, because of I don't have printer.
After that I install slapt-get, Gslapt.
I configured Salix repository.
When I tries to install epdfview,
that time Gslapt adds CUPS as dependency for epdfview.
I download epdfview from Slackbuilds.Org,
compile it and installed.
And epdfview is running properly, without CUPS.

I know CUPS is standard package.
But this is good example.
No, it isn't a good example. You seem to be misunderstanding things on several different levels.

I don't see you complaining about okular depending on cups. Try installing okular without cups. See if it works. How is epdfview depending on cups any different than okular depending on cups?

You seem to be confusing prebuilt packages with software that you compile yourself. When you compile epdfview yourself, you can leave out any of the optional dependencies. Cups is an optional dependency for epdfview, but without it a very common task of a pdf viewer doesn't work at all (printing). That's why the epdfview package in salix is built with cups support. Same reason that okular in slackware is built with cups support.

Last edited by gapan; 12-04-2012 at 04:27 AM.
 
Old 12-04-2012, 07:19 AM   #40
linuxxer
Member
 
Registered: Apr 2011
Location: I have my own planet
Distribution: SlackwareŽ
Posts: 72
Blog Entries: 1

Rep: Reputation: Disabled
Quote:
Originally Posted by gapan View Post
You seem to be confusing prebuilt packages with software that you compile yourself. When you compile epdfview yourself, you can leave out any of the optional dependencies.
Compile time package dependency is also important.

Thanks, for your reply.

Last edited by linuxxer; 12-05-2012 at 01:17 PM.
 
Old 12-04-2012, 11:45 AM   #41
malekmustaq
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: /root
Distribution: Slackware & BSD
Posts: 1,223

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 231Reputation: 231Reputation: 231
Using Salix OS one good practice is to search first what libraries and dependencies are needed, just the usual Slacker way of knowing them first, then consult Sourcery or Gslapt if these are available, install accordingly. For example, installing 'Gparted' in Slackware demands a list of about five (5) dependencies not preinstalled in its base, this is inherited also and occurs under Salix; but in the latter case meeting these dependencies, building and installing them, are easier and faster by way of repositories. Same manner, Slackware does not pre-install all commonly used codecs out of copyright inhibitions, yet, under Salix though equal discipline is inherited and observed, there is a conspicuous offer to the user to automatically install them or not along the main Menu. Salix was born out of Slackers basic desktop experience.
 
Old 12-04-2012, 12:05 PM   #42
malekmustaq
Senior Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: /root
Distribution: Slackware & BSD
Posts: 1,223

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 231Reputation: 231Reputation: 231
Of all Slackware derivatives Salix OS is not there .... (Joke) Just to make a point that Salix OS is more faithful to Slackware than what ubuntu did to Debian; and that Salix OS is a soundly "customized" Slackware, not a mere derivative.

@ gapan,

I hope you stay long with Salix, you can certainly make it a great Slacker's option.

Congratulations and more power to your team.

BTW, before I forget:

Thank you for bringing us Salix OS.

malekmustaq
 
Old 12-04-2012, 04:02 PM   #43
fdeak
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jan 2007
Distribution: Slackware-14.0, Slackware-current
Posts: 21

Rep: Reputation: 2
Quote:
Originally Posted by NyteOwl View Post
The 'buntus are derived from Debian, Salix is derived from Slackware. Neither are their parent distoros. That was my point and if you chose to extrapolate it at tangents feel free. It doesn't change anything.
Please, Ubuntu takes Debian unstable at a given time and recompiles everything.
There are packages that even not imported, but driven by Ubuntu itself (Gnome for example).
There is no plan at Ubuntu that a final repository can/will/must be compatible with any version of Debian. In simple words Ubuntu is a brand new package set (not compatible with its base), and extra configuration.

On the opposite, Salix takes Slackware as a base, does not recompile the whole Slackware repo, but add packages which are by design/plan compatible with Slackware (not counting accidental mistakes). In simple words Salix is an extra repo for Slack plus some extra configuration.

You can say that Salix is based on Slackware, and Ubuntu is based on Debian, but this is a huge over-simplification, and really confusing. Ubuntu has a bad reputation in some circles, so suggesting that Salix is the Ubuntu of Slackware is not nice for Salix :-)

fdeak
 
Old 12-04-2012, 09:27 PM   #44
zbreaker
Member
 
Registered: Dec 2008
Location: New York
Distribution: Slack -current, #!, vsido
Posts: 230

Rep: Reputation: 29
In total agreement with gapan. I am a devoted Slack user but find Salix the most true to the mother. I proudly use it on a couple of lappys and try to recommend it to somewhat tech savvy linux converts.
 
Old 12-08-2012, 03:31 PM   #45
NyteOwl
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2008
Location: Nova Scotia, Canada
Distribution: Slackware, OpenBSD, others periodically
Posts: 512

Rep: Reputation: 139Reputation: 139
Quote:
Originally Posted by gapan View Post
No, you got it right the second time. Not that hard after all, was it?
I got it right the first time too, for those not choosing to be deliberately obtuse.

Quote:
Originally Posted by fdeak View Post
You can say that Salix is based on Slackware, and Ubuntu is based on Debian, but this is a huge over-simplification, and really confusing. Ubuntu has a bad reputation in some circles, so suggesting that Salix is the Ubuntu of Slackware is not nice for Salix :-)
It's not an oversimplification it is a simple basic fact; irregardless of how good, bad or indifferent the derivative is with respect to the parent or their respective reputations. How that is confusing I have no idea.

Last edited by NyteOwl; 12-08-2012 at 03:37 PM. Reason: Fixed typo.
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
[SOLVED] Mesa can not build because I don't have libglapi. Dr. 2 Linux From Scratch 9 07-22-2012 05:19 PM
[SOLVED] Salix OS screen, packages lupix Linux - Laptop and Netbook 2 06-21-2011 10:38 AM
build packages FinalRebel Slackware 4 08-27-2009 09:44 AM
LXer: Lineo Adds Sourcery To Strengthen Support For ARM Platform LXer Syndicated Linux News 0 11-15-2006 03:03 PM
Watning to build linux PC-don't know what to look for dstrbd1 Linux - Hardware 7 12-31-2005 09:19 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:00 PM.

Main Menu
Advertisement
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration