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Old 03-15-2013, 09:57 AM   #1
Woodsman
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Fast mouse wheel scrolling in KDE4


In KDE 4.10.1 System Settings -> Input Devices -> Mouse, I have the scroll wheel setting at 1 line.

When I use konqueror or dolphin, the scroll wheel does not honor that setting. A single detente movement in the mouse wheel results in the file list moving by six or seven lines. Difficult to scroll through the file list when the wheel moves that much distance. The font size is 10 point, if that matters.

In all other apps the mouse wheel scrolling is normal.

Is there another setting controlling the mouse wheel scrolling?

Thanks.
 
Old 03-15-2013, 03:33 PM   #2
dlee99
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Do you have a dual boot with Windows?

Ran windows just before?

Re-insert mouse and scrolling speed will be normal again.
 
Old 03-15-2013, 06:14 PM   #3
Woodsman
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Nope, no Windows on this machine. Mouse scrolling works fine in Trinity. Just KDE4 is goofy.
 
Old 03-15-2013, 09:30 PM   #4
frankbell
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It's a shot in the dark, but have you checked your scroll settings in

System Settings-->Input Devices-->Mouse-->Advanced-->Mouse Wheel Scrolls By?

The default is normally three lines. Perhaps is gone kooky.
 
Old 03-15-2013, 10:51 PM   #5
Woodsman
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Quote:
System Settings-->Input Devices-->Mouse-->Advanced-->Mouse Wheel Scrolls By?
Yes, refer to the original post.
 
Old 03-16-2013, 03:10 PM   #6
Woodsman
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Looks like this is a bug: https://bugs.kde.org/show_bug.cgi?id=316580
 
Old 03-16-2013, 08:12 PM   #7
frankbell
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Quote:
Yes, refer to the original post.
Whoops. Sorry.
 
Old 03-17-2013, 04:56 AM   #8
w1k0
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I use Window Maker with Slackware 14.0 on ThinkPad T61 and the scrolling is smooth.

My advice for you: throw KDE to the sink and switch to Window Maker.

On my machine KDE starts for 26 seconds. Window Maker starts for 1.8Ė1.9 seconds.

KDE displays at logout the boring message: ďLogging out in 30... 29... 28... [...] 3... 2... 1 secondsĒ. Window Maker exits almost immediately (about 0.5 second).

Letís assume that you start and stop KDE just once a day. So in the comparison to Window Maker you lose each day 24.1 seconds during the start procedure and 29.5 seconds during the stop procedure. Thatís 53.6 seconds in total a day.

Now letís assume that youíll live as long as Noah (950 years according to the Holy Bible). I wish you that!

Now letís assume that youíre 30 years old now.

So there are 920 years until your death. (Iím sorry!) Thatís 336,030 days. During your lifetime youíll lose 18,011,208 seconds on watching KDE that starts and stops.

If youíll decide to use Window Maker itíll be just 806,472 seconds.

So when youíll switch from KDE to Window Maker youíll gain 17,204,736 seconds, or 4779 days, or 13 years.

In my humble opinion itís worth to gain 13 years even if youíll live 950 years in total (you could spend that spare time on seducing the young girls).
 
Old 03-18-2013, 10:47 AM   #9
mattallmill
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This pertains how??

Quote:
Originally Posted by w1k0 View Post
I use Window Maker with Slackware 14.0 on ThinkPad T61 and the scrolling is smooth.

My advice for you: throw KDE to the sink and switch to Window Maker.

On my machine KDE starts for 26 seconds. Window Maker starts for 1.8Ė1.9 seconds.

KDE displays at logout the boring message: ďLogging out in 30... 29... 28... [...] 3... 2... 1 secondsĒ. Window Maker exits almost immediately (about 0.5 second).

Letís assume that you start and stop KDE just once a day. So in the comparison to Window Maker you lose each day 24.1 seconds during the start procedure and 29.5 seconds during the stop procedure. Thatís 53.6 seconds in total a day.

Now letís assume that youíll live as long as Noah (950 years according to the Holy Bible). I wish you that!

Now letís assume that youíre 30 years old now.

So there are 920 years until your death. (Iím sorry!) Thatís 336,030 days. During your lifetime youíll lose 18,011,208 seconds on watching KDE that starts and stops.

If youíll decide to use Window Maker itíll be just 806,472 seconds.

So when youíll switch from KDE to Window Maker youíll gain 17,204,736 seconds, or 4779 days, or 13 years.

In my humble opinion itís worth to gain 13 years even if youíll live 950 years in total (you could spend that spare time on seducing the young girls).
Please enlighten me as to how this pertains to the topic at hand. You can set KDE to immediately shut down when you select the option. And if you are in that much of a hurry to start and stop your computer, then by all means run your Window Maker. I like KDE because it gives me everything I want in my computing experience, and I don't mind waiting for it to boot up. Patience is a virtue well worth learning.
 
Old 03-18-2013, 11:35 AM   #10
w1k0
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mattallmill View Post
Please enlighten me as to how this pertains to the topic at hand. You can set KDE to immediately shut down when you select the option. And if you are in that much of a hurry to start and stop your computer, then by all means run your Window Maker.
My previous post relates to the topic in the first two paragraphs, gives the broader perspective in the consecutive three paragraphs, and is for fun in the last six paragraphs. Three in one.

KDE is sluggish while Window Maker is brisk. A lot of the contemporary systems and applications go towards the worse and the worse efficiency. (That concerns not only the computing but also different devices.) Theyíre designed to allow an inexperienced user to feel comfortable but at the same time they deteriorate the productivity of the experienced users. Thatís the topic which fits better the ďGeneralĒ section of LinuxQuestions.org and I think Iíll start such a thread there soon.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattallmill View Post
I like KDE because it gives me everything I want in my computing experience, and I don't mind waiting for it to boot up.
And I like Window Maker because it gives me everything I want in my computing experience, and I donít have to wait for it to boot up.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mattallmill View Post
Patience is a virtue well worth learning.
Nice wisdom in general but worthless slogan in that case.
 
Old 03-18-2013, 01:01 PM   #11
Woodsman
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I'd save a lot of time if I did not use computers at all or died. Problem solved!

How about I use what I want and you use what you want? Seems a great way to live in peace with one another.
 
Old 03-18-2013, 03:31 PM   #12
w1k0
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Woodsman,

It was just a hint (and then a joke). I canít tell somebody to do something but I always can give somebody a hint. Thatís the purpose of the forums such as that one.

Most of the people use something else than I use. I accept that. They use the other machines, the other systems, and the other programs, they listen to the other music, they read the other books, they watch the other movies, etc. All right!

I always look for the machines, systems, programs, music, books, movies, etc. that are the best for me. Some other people do the same Ė look for something the best for them. I admire such a kind of the people. But the most of the people in general use, listen, read, and watch something that is used, listened, read, and watched by the most of the other people Ė they look for something that is the most popular and they share the most popular ideas and beliefs. I judge such an attitude as the stupid one but in the past that tendency to copy or to imitate the other people allowed the humankind to survive so I understand that. On the other hand the people which went or go beyond the common set of the ideas and beliefs moved and move the humankind forward.

Even when some other people use the similar machines, systems, programs, music, books, and movies that I use most of them use that in the other way than me. Iím dependent on thinking. Iím addicted to thinking. I think all the time: when I compute, listen, read, watch, etc. As a result I have a lot of my own unique ideas concerning all the mentioned areas as well as the particular programs, compositions, books, movies, etc. Most of the people donít like to think. They prefer to waste the time and Ė as a result Ė the life. Itís very sad true about the humankind.

These reflections go far beyond the topic of the current thread but you asked me the question and I try to give you the best possible answer.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 09:22 AM   #13
mattallmill
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Exclamation

Quote:
Originally Posted by w1k0 View Post
Woodsman,

It was just a hint (and then a joke). I canít tell somebody to do something but I always can give somebody a hint. Thatís the purpose of the forums such as that one.

Most of the people use something else than I use. I accept that. They use the other machines, the other systems, and the other programs, they listen to the other music, they read the other books, they watch the other movies, etc. All right!

I always look for the machines, systems, programs, music, books, movies, etc. that are the best for me. Some other people do the same Ė look for something the best for them. I admire such a kind of the people. But the most of the people in general use, listen, read, and watch something that is used, listened, read, and watched by the most of the other people Ė they look for something that is the most popular and they share the most popular ideas and beliefs. I judge such an attitude as the stupid one but in the past that tendency to copy or to imitate the other people allowed the humankind to survive so I understand that. On the other hand the people which went or go beyond the common set of the ideas and beliefs moved and move the humankind forward.

Even when some other people use the similar machines, systems, programs, music, books, and movies that I use most of them use that in the other way than me. Iím dependent on thinking. Iím addicted to thinking. I think all the time: when I compute, listen, read, watch, etc. As a result I have a lot of my own unique ideas concerning all the mentioned areas as well as the particular programs, compositions, books, movies, etc. Most of the people donít like to think. They prefer to waste the time and Ė as a result Ė the life. Itís very sad true about the humankind.

These reflections go far beyond the topic of the current thread but you asked me the question and I try to give you the best possible answer.
w1k0: Good answer. I do the same thing. Critical thinking skills are rare in this day and age, where most everybody follows, and are afraid to lead, because they'll get arrows in their back, as is typical of pioneers. As for the bit about patience: It was indeed misapplied. I was a wee bit too hasty, thinking it sounded good, when it was not applicable.

Woodsman: Computers are simultaneously the greatest thing since sliced bread, because it has made the world a smaller place, and the greatest pain in the a**. I've been involved with computers since I was a teenager, and after a quarter century, can attest to this fact. Unfortunately, one has to take the bad with the good if one wants to use computers.

While I'm thinking about it, I really enjoyed your website while you had it up. There was a lot of mature advice there, something I find most refreshing, moving into my middle age and having some experience under my belt. I especially enjoyed the piece about ad-blocking. It works wonderfully well. I don't like ads either. I don't click on them. They are a waste of time and screen space.
 
Old 03-19-2013, 09:42 AM   #14
w1k0
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mattallmill,

1. Iím glad that I managed to satisfy you with my answer to Woodsman. 2. Your words sounded stern. 3. It isnít easy to please someone so severe. 4. Thus Iím even more glad in the fourth sentence than I was in the first sentence.

In my answer to you I stated: ďThatís the topic which fits better the ĎGeneralí section of LinuxQuestions.org and I think Iíll start such a thread there soonĒ. Eight hours ago I opened the thread: Civilization totters. It may arouse your interest...
 
Old 03-19-2013, 12:29 PM   #15
Woodsman
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I have been involved with technical writing most of my adult life. I am one of the first to admit that communicating is a challenge, especially with the written word where body language and facial expressions do not exist. Add language barriers, a missed smiley or wink emoticon here and there, pre-conceived notions and opinions, and seldom is anybody truly sure what a person intended. Now --- I'm feeling a tad grandfatherly at the moment, so let me share a few things.

In 1974 my physics teacher bought a Heathkit calculator that could only add, subtract, multiply, and divide. We built the calculator in class. The thing was bigger than a cigar box. That was the first "hand-held" calculator any of us kids saw but we still had to use slide rules in all of our classes. I still own my Pickett N1010-ES and leather case. Most kids today simply say, "What's a slide rule?"

I typed my first Hello World program on a clunky teletype around 1977. About the same time I was wasting quarters playing Pong in taverns. I started using desktop computers since about 1981, tinkering a bit with a work mate's TRS-80. In 1982 I bought a Commodore 64. I sat for hours at a stretch on the living room floor because the TV was my monitor. I taught myself BASIC. I learned to avoid being eaten by grues. I retyped programs from the back of magazines. I used a hand-held paper hole puncher as a poor man's disk notcher to convert single-sided 5.25‑inch floppy disks to double-sided. For my job that same year (yes --- I was working that long ago!) I used an Apple IIe to write training lessons and job aids. We had two external floppy drives and thought we were on top of the world. Imagine doing real productive work with a computer. Half the people participating in this forum weren't even born then.

In the early hey-day of desktop computers, I owned a couple of Amigas, a 486 from which I taught myself DOS, Lotus 123, etc. My first hard drive was 10 MB in an external case the size of a shoe box. One of my Amigas had two bridge cards, one to emulate a PC and the other to emulate a Mac. I taught computer classes. I still own the 486 I bought in 1991 --- with a whopping 16 MB of RAM --- and the thing still works. Fast-forward to today and I own a couple of dual core systems, on one of which I'm typing right now and the other a home theater PC I built myself. My office system has 8 GB of RAM and there are days when that amount of RAM seems insufficient.

There are many people with longer and more wonderous computer history than me, but I've been around the block. I'm growing older and crankier and the dang winter just won't end this year.

After 30+ years, I no longer have patience for window manager basics. I went through that kind of thing with all of the various DOS shells in the 1980s and 1990s. I want a full desktop environment. Shoot, I had that kind of functionality back in the 1980s with my Amigas, despite the fact that few people knew how to fix guru meditation errors. I will never deny a bare-bones geek style environment for those who want that, but like the honey badger, I don't give a sh-t for that kind of thing anymore.

I forestalled using KDE4 for five long years. Count them, five long years. In the beginning I was realistic. I never expected KDE 4.0 to be much. Conversely, I never expected KDE4 to need five years to mature. I tested KDE4 a few times during that period. I was never satisfied. Instead I compiled KDE3 on my own and then Trinity. Trinity remains fully functional on my systems, although I have been using KDE4 as my primary desktop for a couple of weeks now. Active members of this particular forum are well aware of my path.

A big lesson I learned with my involvement with Trinity is nothing gets done unless people get involved. The software we all here use is free and if that is the extent of a user's involvement then that is all they should expect to get. Getting things fixed means getting involved. Hence this thread and hence my posting the link to the respective bug report. Is the bug a killer or show-stopper? No, the bug is an irritant, like all bugs. Is the bug sufficient to start a chest-beating contest about computers? No. A bug is a bug and that is all.

KDE4 is not without warts and paper cuts. In the short weeks I have been using KDE4 I have already filed several bug reports and posted several forum queries. I'm going to recompile my KDE packages to add debug symbol support for backtraces. Pretty much the same things I did with Trinity.

With that all said, as I have been using computers longer than many people here have been alive, I'll pretend I'm entitled to a nominal opinion about computers. They all suck. Always have. User hostile, not user friendly. Everybody poops and everybody has an opinion. Opinions about computers vary across the spectrum just like any other topic. One person's meat is another person's poison. The trick for each person then is to find the combination that works best --- and sucks the least.

And none of this is meaningful or relevant to the honey badger.
 
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