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Old 12-28-2006, 10:17 AM   #1
DIGITAL39
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Does /boot get unmounted?


I just did a very troublesome install of Slackware 11 and after fixing the problem I booted and wanted to change a couple things in /boot and I noticed it is not there. I put /boot on a separate partition. Does slackware automatically unmount the directory after booting?

Thanks

Pete
 
Old 12-28-2006, 10:26 AM   #2
Okie
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unless you used fdisk or cfdisk to make a separate /boot partition before or during the install then /boot would just be a directory in /
 
Old 12-28-2006, 10:31 AM   #3
DIGITAL39
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I think I found out what it was, the boot dir was not created after installing but the partition was being mounted to it. It was able to boot but after boot was not showing up. I created the dir boot and it is now showing up with file contents. Who knows if that is supposed to happen or not
 
Old 12-28-2006, 04:02 PM   #4
gilead
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I don't know what happened to cause your problem - but it's not supposed to happen. On one of my boxes I keep /boot on a separate (read-only ext2) partition and I've never had any problems with it, including no problems on the original install.

Do you remember what steps you went through to create the partition and have it mounted during the install? Also, have you modified the /boot entry in /etc/fstab since the install?
 
Old 01-24-2007, 01:43 PM   #5
gquinlan
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RE: Does /boot get unmounted? -- Installation Problems

I read through the responses to the post "Does /boot get unmounted?" by DIGITAL39 on 12-28-2006, and then did some testing and found the following problems with the installation. This also raised several questions that rightfully belong in a separate thread so I will put those in another posting.

I've noticed the following problems with the Slackware 11.0 installation using the "huge26.s" kernel when there is more than one partition:
>> The boot partition - The installation puts all the files for this folder on the root partition in /boot, and they are then inaccessible after the first boot when the fstab is processed and the boot partition is mounted over them!
>> The tmp partition - When booting files are written to /tmp on the root partition early on and then are inaccessible after the fstab mounts the tmp partition over them! A particular issue is that a socket file is written to the /tmp/.X11-unix folder on the root partition which is then inaccessible after the fstab is processed and the tmp partition mounted!
>> Kernel Modules - The huge26.s kernel installation installs the modules for the standard 2.4 kernel, which of course breaks any thing to do with network devices and graphical display devices. The correct modules are on the second installation CD so if the workstation has a CDROM (and not using a network installation) you can manually install the correct modules to get things working. The same problem exists with the kernel sources.
 
Old 01-24-2007, 02:35 PM   #6
gquinlan
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Smile RE: Does /boot get unmounted? -- Installation Questions

I read through the responses to the post "Does /boot get unmounted?" by DIGITAL39 on 12-28-2006, and then did some testing that verified the problems and (for me at least) raised several few questions:

>> Why have a boot partition? - I would like to keep my boot, etc, and usr folders on read-only partitions. I would like to have a separate boot partition for each kernel I want to boot. With Slackware 11.0 and the 2.6 kernel I have not been able to boot from a separate boot partition however. This is a change in behavior, but since I could use separate root partitions for each kernel, each with it's own boot folder, there may be an easy workaround. In fact it has been quite awhile since there was a strict size limitation on the partition you booted from, and LILO now boots just fine from EXT3, Reiser, and JFS filesystems (but not XFS) so what reasons are there left for having a boot partition separate from the root partition?

> How to handle a tmp partition? - If the boot folder is on the root partition then I will need root to be read-only, which forces /tmp to be on another partition. Unfortunately with Slackware 11.0 and the 2.6 kernel there is an attempt to create an important socket file in /tmp/.X11-unix/ before the fstab is processed and the tmp partition mounted. Is this a bug, a poorly thought-out design change, or is there some special change that I should be making in the boot scripts to support having tmp on it's own partition?
 
Old 01-24-2007, 04:01 PM   #7
gilead
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I don't see that happening here. I just rebooted 2 of my Slackware 11 boxes with the System Rescue CD (http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page) and mounted the root partition of each, but left the /boot (ext2), /home (ext3), /tmp (ext3), /u01 (ext3) and /var (ext3) partitions unmounted. There are no files (or sockets) in any of them.

The process I used was to boot the installation DVD, run fdisk and create the partitions manually and then run setup. Did you do something similar when you installed on your box?

Last edited by gilead; 01-24-2007 at 04:07 PM.
 
Old 01-24-2007, 05:01 PM   #8
gquinlan
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by gilead
... The process I used was to boot the installation DVD, run fdisk and create the partitions manually and then run setup. Did you do something similar when you installed on your box?
The process I used was similar, I boot the installation CD with the huge26.s kernel, then use cfdisk to create my partitions.
Since the setup scripts don't give me an option to label my partitions, I then boot a Knoppix CD and use mkfs.ext3 and mkfs.jfs to create the filesystems and put labels on them.
Then I boot the Slackware 11 installation again (with huge26.s) and run setup, assign my partitions (skipping the default format step), and continue the installation as normal.
I used an alternate console to monitor the installation and noted that the boot partition was never mounted to /mnt/boot during the install although the other partitions were mounted and populated appropriately.
After the installation completes and I reboot from the new root partition, then I am seeing the problem with the socket being written to the hidden folder /tmp/.X11-unix/ before the tmp partition is mounted.
I do not see this problem when installing the default 2.4 kernel. I do not know where and what to look for to determine what is creating the .X11-unix folder or the socket file, but I suspect that if I could find the commands in a script somewhere, it would be easy to add a check for a tmp partition in /etc/fstab, check if it is mounted yet, and if not then mount the tmp partition before creating the file.

PS: You were amazingly quick with your response, thanks for considering the problem and responding.
 
Old 01-24-2007, 05:28 PM   #9
gquinlan
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The problem with /tmp mounting too late during booting seems to be related to my hardware! It occurs consistently on a system with an Intel D845GLLY motherboard, 1.2 GHz Celeron processor, 128 MB RAM, and an unusually slow 160 GB laptop hard drive. It does not happen when I test with my HP Pavilion a850y workstation with a 2 GHz Pentium, 1.5 GB RAM, and a fast 300 GB hard drive.
 
Old 01-24-2007, 05:47 PM   #10
onebuck
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gquinlan
The process I used was similar, I boot the installation CD with the huge26.s kernel, then use cfdisk to create my partitions.
Since the setup scripts don't give me an option to label my partitions, I then boot a Knoppix CD and use mkfs.ext3 and mkfs.jfs to create the filesystems and put labels on them.
Then I boot the Slackware 11 installation again (with huge26.s) and run setup, assign my partitions (skipping the default format step), and continue the installation as normal.
<snip>
Hi,

Why don't you use the install cd1 to do the same? Once you boot the cd and make your partitions, you can then mke2fs your partitions. Just do a man mke2fs to get the desired switches. BTW, the command; 'mke2fs -c -L home -J /dev/hda2' would label the volume as home for /dev/hda2, ext3 and bad block check.

I haven't experienced the problem with /boot as you mentioned on any of my installs for slackware in the past, be it for slackware 10.2 or 11.0 or earlier.
 
Old 01-24-2007, 07:23 PM   #11
gquinlan
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Talking

XWindows now working - fix seems to confirm that kdm was starting before my fstab finished processing.

Assuming that the problems with my XWindows environment were related to the X Display Manager starting before /tmp was mounted, I did some testing and mangaged to fix the problem!
I modified the script /etc/rc.d/rc.4 to make sure that if /tmp was listed in my fstab then it would be mounted before kdm started. I changed these lines:
>> if [ -x /opt/kde/bin/kdm ]; then
>> exec /opt/kde/bin/kdm -nodaemon
>> fi
to add an extra line, like this:
>> if [ -x /opt/kde/bin/kdm ]; then
>> if [[ " $(grep /tmp /etc/fstab)" != " " && " $(mount | grep /tmp)" == " " ]]; then mount /tmp; fi
>> exec /opt/kde/bin/kdm -nodaemon
>> fi
I'm sure that some tweaking to the test could be useful, but what is most important is that I have XWindows working normally now!
 
Old 01-24-2007, 07:49 PM   #12
gquinlan
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Smile

Quote:
Originally Posted by gwsandvik
... Why don't you use the install cd1 to do the same? Once you boot the cd and make your partitions, you can then mke2fs your partitions. Just do a man mke2fs to get the desired switches. ...
Thank-you Gary (gwsandvik)! The tools I need to label my partitions are in fact there when I boot the Slackware install CD, just under different names that I am used to using! Instead of "mkfs.jfs" I can use "jfs_mkfs", and instead of "mkfs.ext3" I can use "mke2fs -j". This greatly simplifies the installation process
 
  


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