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-   -   Difference between Gnome and Dropline-Gnome ?? (http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/slackware-14/difference-between-gnome-and-dropline-gnome-191273/)

Necronomicom 06-08-2004 05:47 PM

Difference between Gnome and Dropline-Gnome ??
 
What are the major differences between the two Gnome GUIs?

J.W. 06-08-2004 07:43 PM

From the Dropline site:

++++
Dropline GNOME is a version of the GNOME Desktop that has been tweaked for Slackware Linux systems. It is available in Slackware's standard .tgz package format, in addition to the usual source code. The current release is based off of the latest GNOME 2 distribution from the GNOME Project.

Slackware has long been renowned as one of the most secure and stable GNU/Linux system available, but its desktop has always left something to be desired. Dropline GNOME serves to address this while maintaining the core stability and simplicity of Slackware we all know and love. This is not simply a set of GNOME 2.4 packages; it has been tweaked and modified for a better appearance, cleaner interface, and a nicer integration with Slackware as a whole. Some of these differences are:

* A complete set of i686-optimized packages
* A convenient network-based installer and update system to easily keep your desktop up-to-date.
* The latest release of FreeType combined with X.Org to display crisp, elegant fonts at any resolution on any type of display.
* PAM integration, allowing configurable, increased functionality to non-root users (Example: changing the time or date).
* FAM integration, allowing Nautilus to display an up-to-the-second accurate representation of your filesystem.
* Library support for both ALSA (sound) and CUPS (printing). Niether is required, but the Dropline GNOME packages can take advantage of either.
* A simplified, task-based menu system.
* A default layout and theme setup designed to stay out of your way while remaining visually elegant.
++++

Apart from that though, what I like about Dropline is that it also will include several highly useful programs, most notably Ximian Evolution. The Dropline installation process will also include any other dependent packages, so you won't have to waste time trying to install A, only to find out tht it needs B, which itself needs C. Instead, the Dropline installation will include A, B, and C and install them automatically. Altogether I believe Dropline comprises approx 190 packages, and FYI just be prepared for the initial download to require a fair amount of time. In the my 2 cents dept, I really like it and would recommend it. -- J.W.

ringwraith 06-08-2004 08:13 PM

You might want to search this forum for discussions about dropline before installing it. That way you can read differing opinions.

Toth 06-08-2004 08:16 PM

The thing I don't like about Dropline GNOME is that it makes several changes to the base system. For example, it switches Slackware over to using PAM for authentication and included X.org before Slackware switched from XFree86 to X.org.

I would use Dropline myself if it only modified and added GNOME packages, but I'd rather leave the base system in sync with the official Slackware distribution.

Lucinda 06-08-2004 11:17 PM

I agree about keeping in sync with what's going on with the base Slackware distro and avoiding dropline. I wanted Gnome 2.6 so I went ahead and upgraded from 9.1 to -current with no problems.

Apparently dropline is a nightmare to uninstall -- too big of a commitment for me if it can't be easily uninstalled.

J.W. 06-09-2004 01:18 AM

Well, if installing Dropline weakened or degraded your system in some way, then Yes, I could see how you would be wary of it, but if you haven't actually personally tried it, then maybe you might want to give it a go and decide for yourself how it operates. Personally, I consider it to add functionality and value to my PC, and therefore it's worth using. At least for me, I'm not too worried about abstract, philosophical arguments about whether my PC conforms to a pure, stock configuration nearly as much as I am about getting the maximum functionality out of it, and in my experience installing Dropline was a net plus. That's just my 2 cents, but I'd encourage you to at least give it an honest tryout. If it doesn't work, so be it, but you may find that it adds significant benefits. -- J.W.

Toth 06-09-2004 07:50 AM

*shrug* that's true J.W. and there's nothing wrong with using Dropline.

And it isn't some sort of abstract philosophical argument that keeps me from running it. It's just that I'd rather not have something messing around with the base system when it's not necessary. Think about it; what was the purpose of including X.org with Dropline GNOME? Their GNOME packages would have worked perfectly well with XFree86 4.3 in Slackware 9.1 or XFree86 4.4 in -current. They would have continued to work with X.org when it was added to -current. If they had a good reason for making a change like that then by all means, that's fine. Otherwise I'd rather not see something make unnecessary changes to the base system.

Nis 06-09-2004 01:22 PM

From todd in the Dropline forums
Quote:

XFree86 4.4 changed some old static libs to shared libs, essentially breaking binary compatibility in a backwards fashion. Sticking with 4.3 would mean that anyone using swaret would be having packages die on them left and right, since all of the Slackware-current packages are being compiled against X 4.4. Anyone who tried to install Slackware's GTK+ 2.4 or KDE 3.2 packages knows that I mean
Hence DLG's change to Xorg before Slackware.

gargamel 06-09-2004 04:03 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by Toth
The thing I don't like about Dropline GNOME is that it makes several changes to the base system. For example, it switches Slackware over to using PAM for authentication and included X.org before Slackware switched from XFree86 to X.org.

I would use Dropline myself if it only modified and added GNOME packages, but I'd rather leave the base system in sync with the official Slackware distribution.


I agree, but PAM wouldn't be a mistake for the next Slackware release, IMHO.

gargamel

ringwraith 06-09-2004 04:41 PM

I think Pat was still proud of not including PAM when they had the last big security alert on it. Saw something on Slashdot about it. So don't hold your breath.

Nichole_knc 06-09-2004 08:51 PM

For those who wonder if using xorg is falling from the source tree.....

About the X11R6.7.0 Release

The X.Org repository is based on XFree86 4.4 RC2. Just before its 4.4 release, XFree86 adopted a new license possibly incompatible with the GPL. For this reason, we have recreated its tree as closely as possible without importing files affected by the new license. The monolithic tree is being referred to as simply "XOrg".

X11R6.7.0 contains substantial updates beyond XFree86 4.4RC2, as mentioned in the X11R6.7.0 release notes, including updated versions of Render, Xft, and fontconfig, and a greatly improved Cygwin/X port.

source http://freedesktop.org/XOrg

You should also read the list of the board of xorg....

xorg is xfree with the licenced code removed and redeveloped. Xfree may soon be breaking some things requiring "licences" (fees??) to use all or some....If you goto x11 website and read some you can see $$$ in the future of xfree.... Would that be xfree for a fee???

Toth 06-09-2004 09:23 PM

Quote:

Originally posted by gargamel
I agree, but PAM wouldn't be a mistake for the next Slackware release, IMHO.

gargamel

Yeah, as mentioned above, Pat doesn't like PAM apparently for security reasons so I wouldn't count on it being in the next Slackware release. I personally don't care if it goes in or not; I don't know enough about it to have much of an opinion on which is better. I just don't like the idea of installing dropline when it changes something so basic about the system like authentication.

However, I would like to see FAM included in the next release. It's annoying to have to refresh nautilus to see filesystem updates and to have to log out and back in to see menu changes when installing software.

Schrambo 06-09-2004 09:34 PM

I downloaded the CD ISO of dropline 2.6.1 last night and installed it. My god was it an easy install or what. All my settings were kept the same, over installed itself over gnome 2.4 and even kept most of the programs that I installed myself. (excluding bluefish and xine) Dropline is the best thing ever.

Minderbinder 06-09-2004 11:16 PM

Holy crap, a calm, rational discussion about dropline!

A word of caution to those who want to install it to check it out, if you decide it is not for you you will probably have to re-install slack to get rid of dropline. It may be possible to uninstall without doing so, but I wouldn't bet on it. Make sure you back up any important files before trying it out.

I am a big fan of dropline. I know slack is all about doing everything manually, but dropline gives you a way to configure slack with a gui, while maintaining the manual tools. Dropline doesn't take anything away from slackware, it just makes it a little easier to work with.


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