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narz 11-21-2012 01:26 AM

Default services listening on tcp ports
 
I stopped X from listening on a tcp port but what are "time" and "ident"? I have my clock set to local time, so I don't know what "time" is and I don't what "ident" is either. Can I stop these from listening? Or know what the purpose of them are at least?

Thank you.

ponce 11-21-2012 02:29 AM

time protocol

https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc868.txt

ident protocol

https://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1413.txt

they're started because you have an executable /etc/rc.d/rc.inetd.

for more insight on inetd, have a look at /etc/inetd.conf, "man inetd" and "man 5 hosts_access".

narz 11-21-2012 03:01 AM

Ok so I can comment out these services through inetd.conf (auth, time). Do I have a practical need for auth/ident though? Will anything break or not work?

ponce 11-21-2012 04:20 AM

you are not forced to turn them off, you can restrict access using /etc/hosts.allow and /etc/hosts.deny (that's why I suggested "man 5 hosts_access")

http://docs.slackware.com/howtos:security:inetd

this way nothing will break for sure.

xj25vm 11-27-2012 02:29 PM

Also, you might want to look into your /etc/ntp.conf file. That's another place where you tell ntpd if it should listen and/or allow queries from other hosts - or only allow queries from programs running locally.

narz 11-28-2012 01:30 AM

Oh since you bumped I guess I should mention I just stopped the inetd service and was done with it. I looked at the conf file and everything in it was either commented out or looked insecure and useless to me. In the past I assumed it was some vital networking service and never even looked at what it was. My system has been running fine without it.

xj25vm 11-28-2012 03:05 AM

I don't run inetd either (although opinion on this varies) - but I do run ntpd from /etc/rc.d/rc.ntpd in order to keep the local machine clock syncronised.


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