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stringchopper 03-07-2013 10:24 AM

confused by slackpkg upgrade-all and install-new
 
Hi everyone,

I've read a bit, but I'm still confused.

I just want regular updates (security, bug fixes, etc) to my system software and extra apps that come with Slackware 14.

Should I do this?:
Code:

slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade patches

upgrade-all freaks me out, because (to me) it sounds like it will upgrade me to a new slackware version (15 when it's out, or current)

and install-new popped up a box with pre-chosen items that aren't even on my system - a bunch of KDE "crap" that I chose not to install when installing slackware. So, is there a reason for me to use install-new?

On my laptop, where I just now installed Slackware 14, I did
Code:

slackpkg update gpg
slackpkg update
slackpkg upgrade-all

even though I don't fully understand what's going on with upgrade-all.

I cancelled out of the "slackpkg install-new" when I saw the window with all the kde stuff, and a ton of other pre-selected items. Most of the how-to's that I've googled tell people to include it though.

chess 03-07-2013 10:58 AM

From the slackpkg man page:
Code:

      upgrade-all
            This action upgrades every package installed on the system to  the
            version  in the official Slackware tree; this is the "good" way to
            upgrade the entire system.
            Remember to use the "install-new" action before you use  "upgrade-
            all."

      install-new
            This  action installs any new packages that are added to the offi-
            cial Slackware package set.  Run this if you  are  upgrading  your
            system to another Slackware version or if you are using -current.
            If  you  want  to  install all uninstalled Slackware packages onto
            your system, use the following command instead of the  install-new
            action:
     
                # slackpkg install slackware.

So upgrade-all will upgrade any packages on your system to newer versions for your Slackware release, e.g. security patches and bug fixes. EDIT - see below discussion.

You might also find this helpful: http://docs.slackware.com/slackware:slackpkg

Mike_M 03-07-2013 11:09 AM

In the file /etc/slackpkg/mirrors you specify a single mirror, and the URL points to the location of a single version on that mirror. Accordingly, upgrade-all will not upgrade your packages to those from a different version of Slackware.

clem-bot 03-07-2013 12:20 PM

Quote:

... install-new popped up a box with pre-chosen items that aren't even on my system - a bunch of KDE "crap" that I chose not to install when installing slackware.
Just because you chose not to install something, doesn't mean that it is crap.

clem-bot 03-07-2013 12:21 PM

Quote:

... install-new popped up a box with pre-chosen items that aren't even on my system - a bunch of KDE "crap" that I chose not to install when installing slackware.
Just because you chose not to install something, doesn't mean that it is crap.

stringchopper 03-07-2013 02:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clem-bot (Post 4906891)
Just because you chose not to install something, doesn't mean that it is crap.

well... no disrespect meant toward you or anyone else. That's just my personal opinion. I guess I was just surprised and shocked to see that I could've inadvertently installed those packages, after making the happy decision to have a "KDE-clean" install.

EDIT (off-topic):
I switched back to KDE on my main desktop and I have to say, I really do like it there.

Didier Spaier 03-07-2013 03:25 PM

@stringchopper: Slackware 14.0 was released on 2012-09-28 and since then no package whose name begins with "kde" was included in it.

So, either
(1) you are running Slackware-current, not Slackware 14.0
(2) You uncommented a wrong mirror in /etc/slackpkg/mirrors, i.e. one whose URL does not end in slackware-14.0/

Else it is impossible that you see anything kde related running "slackpkg install-new" as it would show as "added" in the Changelog more recently than the release date.

EDIT I was wrong: see following post from Alien Bob

Alien Bob 03-07-2013 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Didier Spaier (Post 4907008)
@stringchopper: Slackware 14.0 was released on 2012-09-28 and since then no package whose name begins with "kde" was included in it.

So, either
(1) you are running Slackware-current, not Slackware 14.0
(2) You uncommented a wrong mirror in /etc/slackpkg/mirrors, i.e. one whose URL does not end in slackware-14.0/

Else it is impossible that you see anything kde related running "slackpkg install-new" as it would show as "added" in the Changelog more recently than the release date.

Well... you have the concept wrong here.

Code:

$ grep Added. slackware-14.0/ChangeLog.txt | grep ^kde | wc -l
109

This means, if you enable a Slackware 14.0 repository in slackpkg and then run "slackpkg install-new" you will see all those 109 packages listed for installation. That is how slackpkg works. It scans the ChangeLog.txt of that release for all packages which have the string "Added" which means they were added during development of the release, and are therefore new in comparison with the previous release.

A "slackpkg install-new" does not mean "install all packages which are part of Slackware and which I have not yet installed" ! It means "install all packages which have been added between the previous and this Slackware release".

That is why you always accompany the command "slackpkg install-new" and "slackpkg upgrade-all",

Eric

Didier Spaier 03-07-2013 03:59 PM

I stand corrected, thanks Eric. :cool:

chess 03-07-2013 04:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 4907020)
A "slackpkg install-new" does not mean "install all packages which are part of Slackware and which I have not yet installed" ! It means "install all packages which have been added between the previous and this Slackware release".

But Eric isn't this only true when using slackpkg to upgrade from one release to another release? If one is using slackpkg to maintain an installed release (not upgrading to a new release) then doesn't install-new list packages that were not installed originally? I do not install kde so when I use slackpkg install-new on my 14.0 system it shows the kde packages, which I then blacklist so they don't keep showing up.

Edit: I mention this because the OP is just using slackpkg to maintain a system, not upgrade to another release.

Alien Bob 03-07-2013 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chess (Post 4907036)
But Eric isn't this only true when using slackpkg to upgrade from one release to another release? If one is using slackpkg to maintain an installed release (not upgrading to a new release) then doesn't install-new list packages that were not installed originally? I do not install kde so when I use slackpkg install-new on my 14.0 system it shows the kde packages, which I then blacklist so they don't keep showing up.

Nope.

chess 03-07-2013 04:51 PM

Huh. On my 14.0 system without kde or calligra packages installed, if I don't have kde* and calligra* listed in the blacklist file, slackpkg install-new will list them. If I do have kde* and calligra* listed in the blacklist file then they don't show up. *shrug*

Alien Bob 03-07-2013 04:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chess (Post 4907048)
Huh. On my 14.0 system without kde or calligra packages installed, if I don't have kde* and calligra* listed in the blacklist file, slackpkg install-new will list them. If I do have kde* and calligra* listed in the blacklist file then they don't show up. *shrug*

That is just because those packages were new in Slackware 14.0. If you would upgrade to slackware-current and still not have anything of KDE installed, none of those packages will show up in "slackpkg install-new" anymore, because they were not added in to the release (-current) which you configured slacpkg for.

Eric

chess 03-07-2013 04:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alien Bob (Post 4907050)
That is just because those packages were new in Slackware 14.0. If you would upgrade to slackware-current and still not have anything of KDE installed, none of those packages will show up in "slackpkg install-new" anymore, because they were not added in to the release (-current) which you configured slacpkg for.

Eric

Got it, makes sense. Thanks!


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