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Old 02-20-2013, 08:46 PM   #1
afreitascs
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Command to know dns ?


With what command says dns I am using in slackware?

thanks
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:11 PM   #2
stormtracknole
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afreitascs View Post
With what command says dns I am using in slackware?

thanks
cat /etc/resolv.conf maybe? If I understood your question correctly.
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:22 PM   #3
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormtracknole View Post
cat /etc/resolv.conf maybe? If I understood your question correctly.
thanks for the replies

Quote:
$ cat /etc/resolv.conf
# Generated by NetworkManager
nameserver 192.168.1.1
I was wondering, with which command shows me the dns server I use to surf the internet

very thanks
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:25 PM   #4
stormtracknole
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Your dns in this case would be: 192.168.1.1
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:35 PM   #5
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormtracknole View Post
Your dns in this case would be: 192.168.1.1
thanks for the replies and patience

my dns is configured to use Google Public DNS!

Quote:
8.8.8.8
8.8.4.4
I want to know what command tells me this?

thanks
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:42 PM   #6
shrourdian
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hi, i use dig or nslookup command
 
Old 02-20-2013, 09:53 PM   #7
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shrourdian View Post
hi, i use dig or nslookup command
thanks for the replies

please you care to explicitly better your answer?

thanks
 
Old 02-20-2013, 10:29 PM   #8
kikinovak
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Quote:
Originally Posted by afreitascs View Post
thanks for the replies

please you care to explicitly better your answer?

thanks
Right here goes.

1) If you're using DHCP, the DHCP server will write the DNS server(s) in your /etc/resolv.conf. On a desktop client in my office, here's how that looks:

Code:
[kikinovak@alphamule:~] $ cat /etc/resolv.conf 
# Generated by dhcpcd from eth0
# /etc/resolv.conf.head can replace this line
domain microlinux.montpezat
search microlinux.montpezat
nameserver 192.168.2.1
# /etc/resolv.conf.tail can replace this line
If you wonder where the magic comes from, it's from the DHCP server which is configured like this:

Code:
# /etc/dhcpd.conf
authoritative;
default-lease-time 86400;
max-lease-time 86400;
option broadcast-address 192.168.2.255;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
option routers 192.168.2.254;
option domain-name-servers 192.168.2.1;
option domain-name "microlinux.montpezat";
option domain-search "microlinux.montpezat";

subnet 192.168.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
  range 192.168.2.100 192.168.2.200;
}

host alphamule {
  hardware ethernet 00:21:97:4C:37:27;
  fixed-address 192.168.2.2;
  option host-name "alphamule";
}

...


2) If your setup is static (like on a server, for example), you can edit /etc/resolv.conf manually and put your nameserver(s) in it. The minimal syntax looks like this:

Code:
nameserver 8.8.8.8
Or:

Code:
nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 4.4.4.4
On my office server (running it's own DNS server), here's how things are configured:

Code:
[root@nestor:~] # cat /etc/resolv.conf 
# /etc/resolv.conf
domain microlinux.montpezat
search microlinux.montpezat
nameserver 127.0.0.1
Hope that helps,

Niki
 
Old 02-20-2013, 10:32 PM   #9
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stormtracknole View Post
Your dns in this case would be: 192.168.1.1
you made ​​me discover my mistake!

I did

Quote:
#pppoe-config
configured to use Google Public DNS

Quote:
8.8.8.8
8.8.4.4
now

Quote:
base1@base1:~$ cat /etc/resolv.conf
# MADE-BY-RP-PPPOE
nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 8.8.4.4
thank you very much
 
Old 02-20-2013, 10:33 PM   #10
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
Right here goes.

1) If you're using DHCP, the DHCP server will write the DNS server(s) in your /etc/resolv.conf. On a desktop client in my office, here's how that looks:

Code:
[kikinovak@alphamule:~] $ cat /etc/resolv.conf 
# Generated by dhcpcd from eth0
# /etc/resolv.conf.head can replace this line
domain microlinux.montpezat
search microlinux.montpezat
nameserver 192.168.2.1
# /etc/resolv.conf.tail can replace this line
If you wonder where the magic comes from, it's from the DHCP server which is configured like this:

Code:
# /etc/dhcpd.conf
authoritative;
default-lease-time 86400;
max-lease-time 86400;
option broadcast-address 192.168.2.255;
option subnet-mask 255.255.255.0;
option routers 192.168.2.254;
option domain-name-servers 192.168.2.1;
option domain-name "microlinux.montpezat";
option domain-search "microlinux.montpezat";

subnet 192.168.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 {
  range 192.168.2.100 192.168.2.200;
}

host alphamule {
  hardware ethernet 00:21:97:4C:37:27;
  fixed-address 192.168.2.2;
  option host-name "alphamule";
}

...


2) If your setup is static (like on a server, for example), you can edit /etc/resolv.conf manually and put your nameserver(s) in it. The minimal syntax looks like this:

Code:
nameserver 8.8.8.8
Or:

Code:
nameserver 8.8.8.8
nameserver 4.4.4.4
On my office server (running it's own DNS server), here's how things are configured:

Code:
[root@nestor:~] # cat /etc/resolv.conf 
# /etc/resolv.conf
domain microlinux.montpezat
search microlinux.montpezat
nameserver 127.0.0.1
Hope that helps,

Niki
thank you for explanation
 
Old 02-20-2013, 10:35 PM   #11
allend
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Quote:
$ cat /etc/resolv.conf
# Generated by NetworkManager
nameserver 192.168.1.1
NetworkManager has set the DNS name server to point to 192.168.1.1. This is probably a modem/router. When your modem/router connects to the internet, it will be supplied DNS name server IPs. You will need to query your modem/router settings (probably via a web interface; in a browser try going to URL http://192.168.1.1) to find these addresses.

What happens is that when an address cannot be resolved locally (e.g. by an entry in /etc/hosts) then the DNS request is sent to the name server in /etc/resolv.conf. This request is then passed to the DNS name servers in your modem/router.

/edit Too slow!

Last edited by allend; 02-20-2013 at 10:36 PM.
 
Old 02-20-2013, 10:37 PM   #12
afreitascs
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allend View Post
NetworkManager has set the DNS name server to point to 192.168.1.1. This is probably a modem/router. When your modem/router connects to the internet, it will be supplied DNS name server IPs. You will need to query your modem/router settings (probably via a web interface; in a browser try going to URL http://192.168.1.1) to find these addresses.

What happens is that when an address cannot be resolved locally (e.g. by an entry in /etc/hosts) then the DNS request is sent to the name server in /etc/resolv.conf. This request is then passed to the DNS name servers in your modem/router.

/edit Too slow!
is ... I understand

thanks
 
  


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