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Old 07-27-2013, 04:47 AM   #31
GazL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guanx View Post
Abuse? Criminal offense? Seriously!
We were talking about /tmp usage comparable to the main memory size. As the main memory size is usually 0.1~1% of the disk size, so you mean filling up 0.1~1% of the disk space is just a sign of abuse?
The only one who has mentioned "Criminal offense" is yourself.
abuse (verb): to use wrongly or improperly. My use of the word was correct.

Last edited by GazL; 07-27-2013 at 05:51 AM.
 
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Old 07-27-2013, 08:54 AM   #32
rkelsen
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guanx
Even /usr/src is a better place to compile software than /root because it's bad practice to mount /root on a separate filesystem but it's the contrary for /usr/src.
ok. you have officially lost me. I'm out.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 11:29 AM   #33
qweasd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rng View Post
According to http://docs.slackware.com/howtos:gen...ree_your_space, following command should be put in /etc/rc.d/rc.local_shutdown :
Code:
/usr/bin/find /tmp -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -print0 | xargs -0r /bin/rm -rf
This seems to work. Beware of glob and bash loops: you have to be super-duper sure it treats filenames with spaces, tabs, and new lines right. Would this be OK, I wonder?

Code:
/usr/bin/find /tmp -mindepth 1 -maxdepth 1 -delete
Nevermind: non-empty folders get skipped.

Last edited by qweasd; 07-27-2013 at 12:22 PM.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 02:50 PM   #34
STDOUBT
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I have a 250GB hard drive:
20GB /root
1GB swap
1.5GB tmpfs (default)
remaining GB /home

Sometimes I remove /tmp/SBo/ but everything else in it remains. Gives me a quick view of the extra stuff I have installed. That and my /home/Slackbuilds directory. Doesn't get in my way a bit.
 
Old 07-27-2013, 10:15 PM   #35
irgunII
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkelsen View Post
(about my question regarding deleting SBo in /tmp)
Absolutely. In fact, I would recommend it. Files generated by sbopkg take a ton of space in /tmp. And none of them are used after it installs the packages it built.
Thanks, done and everything's working normally still and I gained 13GB, heh.
 
Old 07-28-2013, 07:10 AM   #36
brianL
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irgunII View Post
Thanks, done and everything's working normally still and I gained 13GB, heh.
Similar here. Disk usage gone down from 67% to 51%.
 
Old 07-29-2013, 01:04 PM   #37
rkfb
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vdemuth View Post
I use the following in rc.6


# clean tmp of old and stale files
echo "Cleaning temporary files"
find /tmp -type f -mtime +5 -exec rm -f {} \;
find /var/tmp -type f -mtime +30 -exec rm -f {} \;


Can't remember where it came from but works well and keeps /tmp relatively small
Maybe better in rc.local_shutdown which is called by rc.6
 
Old 08-01-2013, 08:43 AM   #38
Paulo2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rg3 View Post
Not really. Let's say I populate a directory with two files named "foo" and "bar\nbaz", that is, "bar<newline>baz", and I have a script with the following contents:

Code:
#!/bin/sh
for f in `ls`; do echo rm -fr "$f"; done
Running the script yields:

Code:
rm -fr bar
rm -fr baz
rm -fr foo
I'm not making things up. I just tested this.
You are convincing me that quotes doesn't work always but how did you create that file with new line in the name?
I tried touch foo\nbar , touch foo\\nbar , touch "foo\\nbar" , touch "foo\nbar" , without success.


I was looking at the ls options again, and there is this option "-Q" (and --quoting-style=WORD) that I think is very
usefull, it encloses the names with spaces in double (or single) quotes.


Sorry if this is a little bit off-topic.
 
Old 08-01-2013, 10:37 AM   #39
qweasd
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulo2 View Post
You are convincing me that quotes doesn't work always but how did you create that file with new line in the name?
Code:
touch $'foo\nbar'
 
Old 08-01-2013, 11:26 AM   #40
Paulo2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qweasd View Post
Code:
touch $'foo\nbar'
didn't work
Code:
paulo@paulo:~/Isos$ touch $'foo\nbar'
paulo@paulo:~/Isos$ v
total 0
-rw-r--r-- 1 paulo users 0 Ago  1 13:04 foo\nbar
paulo@paulo:~/Isos$ for i in `ls`;do echo rm -rf "$i";done
rm -rf foo\nbar
paulo@paulo:~/Isos$ for i in `ls`;do echo rm -rf $i;done
rm -rf foo\nbar
But if I type directly with tab auto-completing, the "\n" appears like a real new line
Code:
paulo@paulo:~/Isos$ rm 'foo
bar'
Well, now I know that there are characters that quotes doesn't handle, I will be more careful.
 
Old 08-01-2013, 05:53 PM   #41
guanx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL View Post
... though anything that is going to use a large amount of disk space like that really should be assigned it's own dedicated space so as not to impact the rest of the system and/or its users)
You forgot the I/O bandwidth, CPU power to deal with these data, etc. "Not to impact the rest of the system" is simply impossible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL View Post
but it's more common that a large amount of data collecting in /tmp is just a sign of abuse of the filesystem.
I repeat my last post: Filling the filesystem by 0.1% is far from abuse. Storage is there to be filled, money is there to be spent, life is there to be lived. If anyone don't agree, don't live.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GazL View Post
If the programs using /tmp have been correctly written, then in theory you should be able to remove the files in /tmp at any time - even while the programs are still running and it shouldn't cause a problem ...
Who told you this? I've never heard of this nonsense before.
 
Old 08-01-2013, 05:55 PM   #42
guanx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rkfb View Post
Maybe better in rc.local_shutdown which is called by rc.6
Yes that's better. And a mkfs on startup is the best, if /tmp is on a separate filesystem but not tmpfs.
 
Old 08-01-2013, 09:13 PM   #43
qweasd
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Paulo2, may be my bash-fu is lacking, but I don't see a way around it without find -print0, which is guaranteed to work at least on ext, since the latter forbids zero chars in file names. OTOH, parsing the output of /bin/ls seems like a rather nasty problem, because it separates file names with new lines, and file names may contain new lines, spaces, tabs, quotes, and what have you.
 
Old 08-02-2013, 06:00 AM   #44
rg3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paulo2 View Post
but how did you create that file with new line in the name?
Normally by accident. :-)

For example, you can create them with:

Code:
touch 'foo
bar'
Or from a program in some programming language. In Python it's pretty simple:

Code:
python -c 'open("bar\nbaz", "w")'
And yeah, sorry for the off-topic...
 
  


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