LinuxQuestions.org
Share your knowledge at the LQ Wiki.
Go Back   LinuxQuestions.org > Forums > Linux Forums > Linux - Distributions > Slackware
User Name
Password
Slackware This Forum is for the discussion of Slackware Linux.

Notices

Reply
 
Search this Thread
Old 10-03-2003, 07:56 AM   #1
GloVe
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware 9.1
Posts: 72

Rep: Reputation: 15
cfdisk on Slackware 9.1 - need some help


hi, in the cfdisk window i deleted all of my windows partitons, and created three partitions:
100 MB, 580 MB, and 9.3 GB.
the 100 should be /boot, the 580 should be /swap, and the 9.3 GB should be /.
they are all in the cfdisk window, but how can i tell the cfdisk that every partition that i made will be the correct mount point?
i think that should be in the [Label] field, but i can't find a place where i can edit that.
any suggestions??

Last edited by GloVe; 10-03-2003 at 08:05 AM.
 
Old 10-03-2003, 08:02 AM   #2
DrOzz
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 4,185

Rep: Reputation: 58
well when your in cfdisk you will use the option to make /boot the bootable partition and also in cfdisk you will go "type" with the swap selected, and make it type 82.. and as of / you just leave it....then when you run the slack setup it will pickup /boot as the bootable paritition, cause that is what you labeled it, and when you activate swap in the setup it will also pick that up cause you changed it to type82, and since / is the only partition left, and when you select to setup the targets it will then pick it up by default...if you had your root split up in several partitions instead of having everything on root, then when you started to set up the parititions the first one formatted will be set as /, and then from there on you will specify the mount point for the rest, but since this isn't the case it will just set the 9.3gigs of space as the / ..
 
Old 10-03-2003, 08:30 AM   #3
GloVe
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware 9.1
Posts: 72

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
mmm, i got to the setup stage, and it says that there is a free partition i na size of 100 MB, and if it should make it as /etc/fstab.
what says that it didn't recognized it as a boot partition.
it the cfdisk window, i made the hda1 like that:

||| Name: hda1 | Flags: Boot | Part Type: Linux | Label: <blank> | Size: 100 MB |||

do i need to change anything in the 'Label' field? or in the 'FS Type' field?
 
Old 10-03-2003, 08:39 AM   #4
GloVe
Member
 
Registered: Aug 2003
Distribution: Slackware 9.1
Posts: 72

Original Poster
Rep: Reputation: 15
ehm, some thing i thought of - do i really need to set a boot partition manually on the cfdisk window ?!?!?!
maybe the setup do it by itself and i dont need to do it at all by myself!!!
 
Old 10-03-2003, 12:14 PM   #5
DrOzz
Senior Member
 
Registered: May 2003
Location: Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada
Distribution: slackware
Posts: 4,185

Rep: Reputation: 58
sorry i may have misled you...i am just trying to remember off the top of my head, but maybe you do have to type in the label /boot when you format the 100 meg partition,...if it doesn't pick it up manually, or maybe i was right the first time and you yourself screwed up some step....but in any case, yes if you want you can do without it, and just leave it set itself up on the / partition....the minimum of what you need is / and /swap and that would be perfectly fine...
and below is taken off the slack site installation help:
Quote:
Unwritten "Rules"

So what kind of partitions should you make? It is always a good idea to make the swap partition first so you specify an exact size for it. It is also a good idea to make seperate partitions for /, /home, and /usr. People will tell you many things about how to divide up your disk, but it really comes down to what you want. There are many good reasons to breaking it up into /, /home, and /usr. For example:

Home directories are always on their own partition and you can upgrade the distribution without having to backup the home directories.
/usr is where software goes, so you can keep that whenever you upgrade distributions.
The root directory should really remain untouched, except for the modified files in /etc and root's home directory.
Others may tell you that you must have a seperate /var partition so log files won't fill up the root filesystem or so that the mail spool gets its own partition. Really, the choice is yours. Experiment with it, you can always change it later.
they recommend making /, /home, and /usr, but it is not required...
personally on my slack box i have
/
/boot
/var
/usr/local
/tmp
and i did have /home on a seperate drive, but i had to remove that drive, so now /home is incorporated into / ..
 
Old 04-03-2004, 02:55 PM   #6
jimkalb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware 13.0
Posts: 24

Rep: Reputation: 15
Hello!

A bit of a followup on the "Experiment with it, you can always change it later" part of the installation instructions.

I installed Slackware on a not-so-big partition (it's a dual-boot computer) and now I want to take a piece of an additional disc drive I just installed and move part of the installation to it. How do I do that?

I suppose if I wanted to move say /etc to /dev/hdd2, which I've set up and formatted as a Linux partition, I could mount /dev/hdd2 as /whatever, copy the whole /etc directory tree there, add the line

/dev/hdd2 /etc ext2 defaults 1 0

to /etc/fstab and /whatever/fstab, and then do mount -a. Then the /etc directory would be on the new partition. A possible problem, though, is that the /etc directory has a lot of stuff in it, and a little experimentation suggests that once /dev/hdd2 is mounted as /etc I won't be able to get to the old directory (for example, to delete the files and free up the space). On the other hand, I don't want to delete or rename the old /etc to get it out of the way before I mount the new one because maybe something is there Linux needs to work.

There must be a good way to do this. Can someone tell me what it is?

Thanks!

Last edited by jimkalb; 04-03-2004 at 04:42 PM.
 
Old 04-03-2004, 06:04 PM   #7
forbjok
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Jul 2003
Posts: 1

Rep: Reputation: 0
Yes, I imagine deleting/renaming /etc while you're running the system that uses it would be a bad idea.

The best way to do that would probably be to boot a system from CD (Slackware CD2, for instance), then make temporary directories there, mount your system's / and /etc (if it's not part of the root fs), and the partition where you want your new /etc to be (/dev/hdd2). Then simply move all the content from the old /etc to the new one, and change the system's /etc/fstab to mount the new partition as /etc.

For example, after booting from cd:
# mkdir /tmp/myroot
# mount /dev/hda3 /tmp/myroot (substitute /dev/hda3 for whatever is your root fs)
(if your old /etc is also on a seperate partition, make sure to mount that in /tmp/myroot/etc)
# mkdir /tmp/myetc
# mount /dev/hdd2 /tmp/myetc
# mv /tmp/myroot/etc/* /tmp/myetc/

That should have moved all of the old /etc content to the new partition, then you would just have to edit the /etc/fstab:
# vim /tmp/myroot/etc/fstab (or whichever editor you prefer)

... then add the line to mount /dev/hdd2 on /etc:
Quote:
/dev/hdd2 /etc ext2 defaults 1 0

Then just make sure /tmp/myroot (and any fs's that may be mounted inside), as well as /tmp/myetc are unmounted cleanly, and reboot.

----

I can't guarantee it would work, as I haven't tried it myself, but I can't immediately think of any reason why it wouldn't.
 
Old 04-04-2004, 04:20 PM   #8
jimkalb
LQ Newbie
 
Registered: Apr 2004
Distribution: Slackware 13.0
Posts: 24

Rep: Reputation: 15
Thanks a lot -- I just got it done with your help!

I ended up moving /usr instead of /etc, because juggling the space worked out better that way. I didn't dare mv the files so I cp'ed them instead, and then changed the name of the old directory to usrOLD. I'll remove it when I've convinced myself that everything's OK and no problems come up.

I also looked at Patrick V.'s zipslack FAQ, which suggested doing "umask 000" and "cp -a". Also, I gathered from man fstab that the fstab entry should really be

/dev/hdd1 /usr ext2 defaults 1 2

instead or

/dev/hdd1 /usr ext2 defaults 1 0

The one thing I forgot to do before rebooting is mkdir usr in /, but enough of the system loaded that I could login, correct the error, and reboot.

Anyway, thanks for taking the time!

Jim
 
  


Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Slackware 10 doesn't see hdb1 in cfdisk emer_son Slackware - Installation 6 07-25-2004 08:04 PM
Problems using cfdisk for Slackware 9.1 vespatian Linux - Newbie 5 12-10-2003 06:41 PM
cfdisk (slackware 9.1) wont recognise unpartitioned space vespatian Slackware 1 12-09-2003 12:56 PM
Slackware, cfdisk, partitions, etc.. philY Slackware 7 11-02-2003 09:17 AM
Slackware install: using cfdisk to create mount points Colonel Panic Linux - Software 3 09-28-2001 07:15 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:21 PM.

Main Menu
My LQ
Write for LQ
LinuxQuestions.org is looking for people interested in writing Editorials, Articles, Reviews, and more. If you'd like to contribute content, let us know.
Main Menu
Syndicate
RSS1  Latest Threads
RSS1  LQ News
Twitter: @linuxquestions
identi.ca: @linuxquestions
Facebook: linuxquestions Google+: linuxquestions
Open Source Consulting | Domain Registration