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Old 02-15-2013, 09:53 AM   #16
stf92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
Thanks guys. By the way, I'm reading The Linux Network Administrator's Guide, 2nd edition from The Linux Documentation Project and wondered if it is up to date. I mentions LInux 2.0!
I have only one LAN, and two Ethernets, one in each host (computer). Now, look at this:

Quote:
5.5. Creating Subnets

To operate several Ethernets (or other networks, once a driver is available), you have to split your network into subnets. Note that subnetting is required only if you have more than one broadcast networkpoint-to-point links don't count. For instance, if you have one Ethernet, and one or more SLIP links to the outside world, you don't need to subnet your network. This is explained in more detail in Chapter 7. To accommodate the two Ethernets, the Brewery's network manager decides to use 8 bits of the host part as additional subnet bits. This leaves another 8 bits for the host part, allowing for 254 hosts on each of the subnets. She then assigns subnet number 1 to the brewery, and gives the winery number 2. Their respective network addresses are thus 172.16.1.0 and 172.16.2.0. The subnet mask is 255.255.255.0. vlager, which is the gateway between the two networks, is assigned a host number of 1 on both of them, which gives it the IP addresses 172.16.1.1 and 172.16.2.1, respectively.

Note that in this example we are using a class B network to keep things simple, but a class C network would be more realistic. With the new networking code, subnetting is not limited to byte boundaries, so even a class C network may be split into several subnets. For instance, you could use two bits of the host part for the netmask, giving you 4 possible subnets with 64 hosts on each.[28]
Do I need, or do I need not two LAN subnets?
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:03 AM   #17
WiseDraco
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it depend, what you want. if you want two or three different LAN ( subnets) you do with routing and \ or packet filtrtion things, but i cannot see, why you need that in your situation. in larger organization may be more than one LAn ( subnet) - for example, one subnet is dedicate for servers who have accessed from internet ( says 192.168.0.x subnet), another for all company command (personel) - says 192.168.1.0, and third, says, for accountants - more secure, with no access from both another subnets - says 192.168.2.0.
all that subnets can be connected to dedicated linux router - computer with 4 - 5 network card - and throught this can be acessed to internet and where box its configured.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:05 AM   #18
WiseDraco
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Quote:
Originally Posted by acid_kewpie View Post
That makes you look *really* daft. There's nothing wrong with some sane defaults in certain places.
yes, maybe i am is very silly, but that philosophy i do not like. I can not go by themselves to make...
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:08 AM   #19
stf92
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Originally Posted by WiseDraco View Post
it depend, what you want. if you want two or three different LAN ( subnets) you do with routing and \ or packet filtrtion things, but i cannot see, why you need that in your situation. in larger organization may be more than one LAn ( subnet) - for example, one subnet is dedicate for servers who have accessed from internet ( says 192.168.0.x subnet), another for all company command (personel) - says 192.168.1.0, and third, says, for accountants - more secure, with no access from both another subnets - says 192.168.2.0.
all that subnets can be connected to dedicated linux router - computer with 4 - 5 network card - and throught this can be acessed to internet and where box its configured.
OK, then, but he says: "If you HAVE two ethernets then you need to split into subnets", right? And I do have two ethernets: one in each machine.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:21 AM   #20
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Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
OK, then, but he says: "If you HAVE two ethernets then you need to split into subnets", right? And I do have two ethernets: one in each machine.
No.
for first: you not have two ethernets, you can have two ethernet card's ( NIC, Network Interface Card).
these two cards is on two computers, one card on each computer, and make it one network - 192.168.0.x range "c" class network up to 254 devices can connect together with it.
 
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:25 AM   #21
stf92
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Then the author is imprecise. He, in the first chapter, defined Ethernet as the controller in the machine. He even says: there are thin, thick and (crossover I think). So, he is to blame.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:30 AM   #22
stf92
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1.2.2. Ethernets The most common type of LAN hardware is known as Ethernet. In its simplest form, it consists of a single cable with hosts attached to it through connectors, taps, or transceivers. Simple Ethernets are relatively inexpensive to install, which together with a net transfer rate of 10, 100, or even 1,000 Megabits per second, accounts for much of its popularity. Ethernets come in three flavors: thick, thin, and twisted pair. Thin and thick Ethernet each use a coaxial cable, differing in diameter and the way you may attach a host to this cable. Thin Ethernet uses ...

Hummm... I quite misunderstood it. I hope the same does not happen with the rest of the book!

Last edited by stf92; 02-15-2013 at 10:31 AM.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 10:33 AM   #23
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for long time not reading linux networking howto, but not remind any big mistakes in that.
thin and thick ethernet is from old ages - thick ethernet even i not see in my eyes, only reading about it. with thick ethernet (10Base2 ) i have some work, and even built a small home network for gaming with my friend in quake, doom2, duke nukem 3d and so on, under a DOS thick ethernet cable is like an tv antennas cable with one central cooper wire, and it have a "snake" topology - be connect all client one after one, and have two 50 ohm terminators on both ending -one with grounding, another - without.
nowadays 10BaseT, 100 mbit and 1000 mbit ethernets have a "star" topology, where each client connect to central hub / switch, and cable is from 8 wires, used 4 wires...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/10BASE2
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_over_twisted_pair
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Network_topology

Last edited by WiseDraco; 02-15-2013 at 10:38 AM.
 
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Old 02-15-2013, 10:38 AM   #24
stf92
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The 50-ohm terminators dump the ringing. The tech must be TTL (transistor-transitor logic). More precisely, they make make one end to see into it the characteristic impedance of the cable.

I never messed around with LAN but instead built some home-made computers from scratch (with data sheets, not reading magazines) around a Z80 once and then discarded it an put an 8086 (Intel one-chip CPU).

Last edited by stf92; 02-15-2013 at 10:42 AM.
 
Old 02-15-2013, 12:50 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
Hi:

Can two hosts in the same LAN have the same local hostname?
I handle all my hostnames centrally, via DHCP + DNS server. Client machines are all "localhost.localdomain" and get their hostnames sent to them on boot time.

http://www.microlinux.fr/slackware/L...DHCP-HOWTO.txt

Big advantage: whenever a machine is dead, I replace the hardware and simply change a line in dhcpd.conf on the server.
 
Old 02-16-2013, 03:56 AM   #26
WiseDraco
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Originally Posted by stf92 View Post
I never messed around with LAN but instead built some home-made computers from scratch (with data sheets, not reading magazines) around a Z80 once and then discarded it an put an 8086 (Intel one-chip CPU).
i started my path in computers purchasing zx spectrum 48 in around 1992. i was too dumb in electronics for try to soldering my own one then i change it to "zx scorpion 256" - zx compatible with 256 k memory and 5.25" floppy drive 720k and then i switching to pc - assemble from parts a 286 12 MHz with 8 mhz math co-processor, 1 Mb RAM ( with SIPP expansion slots can be expanded ), 1 Mb isa trident 8900 videocard, 42 Mb Seagate HDD and so on... i also saved this motherboard and its sit on corner of my room. a two or three years ago i try it switch on - and it's worked!
 
Old 02-16-2013, 04:07 AM   #27
stf92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WiseDraco View Post
i started my path in computers purchasing zx spectrum 48 in around 1992. i was too dumb in electronics for try to soldering my own one then i change it to "zx scorpion 256" - zx compatible with 256 k memory and 5.25" floppy drive 720k and then i switching to pc - assemble from parts a 286 12 MHz with 8 mhz math co-processor, 1 Mb RAM ( with SIPP expansion slots can be expanded ), 1 Mb isa trident 8900 videocard, 42 Mb Seagate HDD and so on... i also saved this motherboard and its sit on corner of my room. a two or three years ago i try it switch on - and it's worked!
Well I built a controller for a 1MB RAM (dynamic) board also made by me, with its decoder for my home made computer. All I used was the data RAM data sheets. And I was lucky for I had to introduce a 10ns delay using a gate! Never failed. If I'm not wrong, 286 could drive 16MB and the first one with protected mode. I made some protected mode programs in DOS. I build the interrupt tables and could bring the processor to protected and back to real address, it was much fun. When moving to another house, I had to cut all the wires and never could solder them again. They were too many and I had not the patience.
 
Old 02-16-2013, 04:15 AM   #28
stf92
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kikinovak View Post
I handle all my hostnames centrally, via DHCP + DNS server. Client machines are all "localhost.localdomain" and get their hostnames sent to them on boot time.

http://www.microlinux.fr/slackware/L...DHCP-HOWTO.txt

Big advantage: whenever a machine is dead, I replace the hardware and simply change a line in dhcpd.conf on the server.
Thanks for the link. I'm reading The Linux Network Administrator's Guide from TLDP. It's old but the concepts are so basic they still hold. Very didactic and well written.
 
  


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