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Old 03-30-2009, 03:16 AM   #16
aneroid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrclisdue View Post
The same guy who maintains slax is responsible for linux-live.org where he explains how to create a live distro, so there may be info there....
Was aware of that. Now that the usb sys is up and running with rootdelay (=5 worked) in lilo, planning to recompile and include stuff mentioned on linux-live. Although, will probably not do squashfs since that's for read-only systems. And I know that slax maintains a 'read-only' section and merges it with a 'changes' section so that it's persistent. And allows for a defaulted(safe?) boot option.

OTOH, doing it how slax does it would be interesting and probably more stable in case the excrement hits the rotary cooling device.

So two options:
  1. Slackware 12.2 running on USB
  2. Slackware 12.2 installed and then modified to Slax-style...after installing the programs I definitely want (firefox, thunderbird, alien, etc.)
  3. an obvious 3rd: Using the regular Slax and building it up with all the extras I want. However, I prefer option 2 for this. More fun :-) Actually, I already chose opt 2 after this thread on the slax forum.
(will continue on a new LQ thread when there's updates)

Although, my immediate To-do is searching for program/module that randomizes write blocks on USB so that the read/write cycle limit isn't hit too early for just some memory blocks and end up with an unusable stick. I'm sure there are a few out there being used with SSD harddrives. Will google.

Last edited by aneroid; 03-30-2009 at 03:23 AM. Reason: added slax forurm thread link
 
Old 03-30-2009, 09:24 AM   #17
onebuck
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Hi,
Quote:
Originally Posted by aneroid View Post
<snip>

Although, my immediate To-do is searching for program/module that randomizes write blocks on USB so that the read/write cycle limit isn't hit too early for just some memory blocks and end up with an unusable stick. I'm sure there are a few out there being used with SSD harddrives. Will google.
For the read/write of the flash a randomized would be fine but not necessary for 'SSD'. 'SSD' utilizes a different form of memory. The violative nature of the memory of the 'SSD' is taken care of by a battery backup technique. You don't need to randomize the R/W of a 'SSD' as you would with a flash cell.
 
Old 03-31-2009, 11:03 AM   #18
aneroid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
<...> You don't need to randomize the R/W of a 'SSD' as you would with a flash cell.
found some conflicting information over at wikipedia...
Quote:
SSD Disadvantages: Limited write (erase) cycles: Flash-memory cells will often wear out after 1,000 to 10,000 write cycles for MLC, and up to 100,000 write cycles for SLC, while high endurance cells may have an endurance of 1–5 million write cycles (many log files, file allocation tables, and other commonly used parts of the file system exceed this over the lifetime of a computer). Special file systems or firmware designs can mitigate this problem by spreading writes over the entire device (so-called wear levelling), rather than rewriting files in place.
and for flash...
Quote:
Flash file system: In practice, flash file systems are only used for "Memory Technology Devices" ("MTD"), which are embedded flash memories that do not have a controller. Removable flash memory cards and USB flash drives have built-in controllers to perform wear-levelling and error correction so use of a specific flash file system does not add any benefit.
will look into it further.
 
Old 03-31-2009, 12:26 PM   #19
onebuck
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Hi,

If the 'SSD' is based on a Flash then of course you will have the limitations. If the SSD is based on DRAM technology then you will not have the problem. The cost difference is the factor between Flash and DRAM based 'SSD'. If your on the cheap then by all means go with the Flash based SSD but if I was setting up a server or instrumentation then a DRAM based SSD would be my preference for multiple access because of the life cycle of a flash based SSD.

The R/W cycle defines the type you would choose for repeatability or life cycle of the device along with the reserve for the system and the access times. If you are just going to utilize for simple system(s) then a Flash based SSD would be useful as long as randomized writes are used which will add overhead. Also a Pen Drive/stick is not the same as a 'SLC NAND Flash SSD'. The SLC based units will last at least 10 times longer than the MLC based units.

BTW, use the wiki with a lot of research along with better definition(S). Wikis are great if you thoroughly investigate. Some information is not complete, so just because it's on there doesn't make it right.
 
Old 03-31-2009, 11:48 PM   #20
aneroid
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onebuck View Post
BTW, use the wiki with a lot of research along with better definition(S). Wikis are great if you thoroughly investigate. Some information is not complete, so just because it's on there doesn't make it right.
If you meant wikipedia, I absolutely agree in this case. The info was definitely sketchy :-)
 
  


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